DeLonghi HS20/2 Electric Convector Heater 2kW £19.98 @ Ebuyer
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DeLonghi HS20/2 Electric Convector Heater 2kW £19.98 @ Ebuyer

12
Found 21st Nov 2012
DeLonghi HS20/2 Electric Convector Heater 2kW

Convector heaters like the HS20/2 from De'Longhi are designed to provide rapid warmth and are suitable for rooms where spot heat is needed. Their technology means they are extremely light and quiet, which makes them easy to move from room to room and suitable for any room in the house, even the bedroom.

The De'Longhi HS20/2 Convector Heater has a 2 kW maximum heat output with an adjustable thermostat. It has one heat setting and features an overheat protection system with thermal cut-out and frost protection. Silent in operation, this convector heater has wide-span curved feet for improved stability, carrying handles for easy movement and can be wall mounted. It comes complete with a fitted plug and three-year guarantee.

Features:

Electric convector heater with 2 kW maximum heat output
1 heat setting with overheat protection
Adjustable thermostat
Wide-span feet and handles for easy movement
Wall mountable

Box Contains:

1 x De'Longhi HS20/2 Convector Heater
1 x Set of wall mounting brackets
2 x Floor-standing feet and fixings
1 x Full product instruction

12 Comments

Warm ;-)

Just ordered one, thanks OP.

whats the cost per hour please?

It's a 2kW heater so multiply the number of hours you'll have it on for with your leccy tarriff...

alchemistkevin

It's a 2kW heater so multiply the number of hours you'll have it on for … It's a 2kW heater so multiply the number of hours you'll have it on for with your leccy tarriff...




It has a thermostat, so that will not give an accurate result.

electricity is what about 12-14p per kWh. Thats a lot of money. This is 2kW.

Heat added ...seriously though got one of these in my caravan and found that it was the best source of heating I could use.

Anybody know if this has an actual thermostat, or just some device that adjusts the amount of time the heating element stays on for?
I.e., can I set it at 20C and expect the room to stay at that temperature regardless of the ambient temperature?
I have a Dimplex heater at the moment that just has numbers 1-6 on the thermostat dial and as far as I can tell, 6 means "on all the time" and 1 means "on some of the time", with everything else falling somewhere in between. I use this in my baby's room but with the temperatures fluctuating quite a bit lately his room can get too hot or too cold at night.

QuackingPlums

Anybody know if this has an actual thermostat, or just some device that … Anybody know if this has an actual thermostat, or just some device that adjusts the amount of time the heating element stays on for?


They are the same thing. That's how a thermostat works. How well it works is another matter - if it is too influenced by the temperature of the heater itself, it won't accurately control the temperature of the room.
Edited by: "pibpob" 22nd Nov 2012

Inactive

It has a thermostat, so that will not give an accurate result.


Indeed - but the *maximum* cost is 2 units per hour. No-one can tell you how much it'll actually cost you because no-one knows the characteristics of the room it's in, the weather, the temperature you want, etc.

pibpob

They are the same thing. That's how a thermostat works. How well it … They are the same thing. That's how a thermostat works. How well it works is another matter - if it is too influenced by the temperature of the heater itself, it won't accurately control the temperature of the room.



No it isn't. Technically a thermostat senses the temperature and adjusts the length of time that the heating element stays on for. A simple thermocouple could achieve this. A PID controlled one might even apply a feedback control loop to compensate for under/overheating error. A time-based control on the other hand would ignore the temperature in the room and effectively just add a fixed amount of heat to it regardless, and this type shouldn't even be allowed to be labelled as a thermostat IMO.

I've since found out that this model has the latter, as do most cheap heaters of this variety. The more expensive DeLonghi units do have proper thermostats, hence why I asked.

Ah I think I understand the confusion. Both cases use a mechanical thermostat because it's the cheapest way of switching large currents on and off. But in one case an effort is made to isolate the thermostat from the influence of the heater and in the other case it is not. The latter also acts as a safety device if the output of the heater is blocked.
Edited by: "pibpob" 23rd Nov 2012
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