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Denon AVRX3600 Dolby Atmos AV Receiver & Amazon Echo Dot 3rd Gen Smart Speaker £799 @ Richer Sounds
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Denon AVRX3600 Dolby Atmos AV Receiver & Amazon Echo Dot 3rd Gen Smart Speaker £799 @ Richer Sounds

£799£1,04824%Richer Sounds Deals
14
Posted 27th Nov 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

’What Hi-Fi?’ 2019 Product of the Year.

9-channel surround sound
With 9.2 channels of sound, the AVR-X3600H gives you a wide range of surround sound and multi-room options. Choose between 7.2.2 or 5.2.4 Dolby Atmos speaker configurations with two or four ceiling speakers. Alternatively, stick with 5.2.2 and power a second pair of speakers in another room or bi-amp your main pair of speakers. As your system grows, so the capability of this Denon AVR grows with it.

Max up the Atmos
Featuring an 11.2 channel pre-output, you can take the AVR-3600H to the next level of Dolby Atmos – 7.2.4. With this configuration, you get seven surround speakers, four ceiling speakers and two subs, for incredibly immersive surround sound. Just add an additional 2-channel amp, and you’re ready to go.

Power for all speakers
Benefiting from a punchy 105 watts per channel, the AVR-X3600H has the ability to drive a wide range of different speakers – even in larger rooms. High grade audio components mean this AV receiver isn’t just about power, it’s about quality, too, making it just as impressive with music as it is with movies. When it comes to processing power, the 32-bit AKM convertors make this Denon AVR smooth and adaptable with all audio files, including Hi-Res files such as DSD 5.6, FLAC and WAV.

IMAX Enhanced Technology
IMAX has partnered with DTS and award-winning Hollywood sound mixers to deliver stunning levels of sound quality. Only the highest quality home cinema equipment meets the standard. IMAX enhanced content is due on HDR streaming and UHD Blu-ray and promises to offer the next step-up in sound from the already impressive DTS:X.

Dolby Atmos, DTS:X and DTS Neural:X for cinematic sound
Dolby Atmos uses ceiling or upwards firing speakers to produce a multi-dimensional, immersive sound that's a match for the finest cinemas. DTS:X literally pushes the boundaries of what you can expect from home cinema. It renders images in three dimensions that conventional processing can't match. DTS Neural:X upmixer supports Dolby formats, giving you DTS surround whatever the format.
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14 Comments
Fantastic price
JamesArmstrong27/11/2019 17:26

Fantastic price


I think so too. But I guess here people don't care about how good a discount is, as a receiver of this level is considered too expensive anyway.
the problem is the more you pay the less gains you get for the average person with average speakers etc
The sound quality on this is fairly similar to the much cheaper 2600; only get this if you are using 9 speakers (the 2600 only does 7 speakers) or if you really want the slightly better room audio correction system on this vs the 2600 (personally, I don't think it's worth the premium). I used the 2400 (almost the same, from 2017) and it was great.

Also the way they describe the power on these amps really annoys me - "105 watts per channel"...oh really? So it's got 9 channels and can pump out 105 watts onto all 9 speakers can it? Answer: No. It can only pump out "105 watts per channel" if you are only using 2 speakers. If you are using all 9 channels, it'll be more like 20 watts per channel (but they don't like customers to notice this)

Also note that modern AV receivers have so many bits in them they are inherently unreliable; mine had several random and annoying defects (like turning the screen blue randomly) that couldn't be fixed despite being sent for repair so eventually I gave it back for a refund.

Finally - note that the prices for this will drop when next year's models are released, so if you're not in a hurry, wait until next spring/summer which is typically the best time to buy (a few weeks after the new model is announced). But it's a guessing game as once they sell out then prices are high on current year model again.
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot01/12/2019 08:21

The sound quality on this is fairly similar to the much cheaper 2600; only get …The sound quality on this is fairly similar to the much cheaper 2600; only get this if you are using 9 speakers (the 2600 only does 7 speakers) or if you really want the slightly better room audio correction system on this vs the 2600 (personally, I don't think it's worth the premium). I used the 2400 (almost the same, from 2017) and it was great.Also the way they describe the power on these amps really annoys me - "105 watts per channel"...oh really? So it's got 9 channels and can pump out 105 watts onto all 9 speakers can it? Answer: No. It can only pump out "105 watts per channel" if you are only using 2 speakers. If you are using all 9 channels, it'll be more like 20 watts per channel (but they don't like customers to notice this) Also note that modern AV receivers have so many bits in them they are inherently unreliable; mine had several random and annoying defects (like turning the screen blue randomly) that couldn't be fixed despite being sent for repair so eventually I gave it back for a refund.Finally - note that the prices for this will drop when next year's models are released, so if you're not in a hurry, wait until next spring/summer which is typically the best time to buy (a few weeks after the new model is announced). But it's a guessing game as once they sell out then prices are high on current year model again.


If you haven't compared both models I don't think it's fair to say that the sound quality between the two models is similar. I compared the 2300 and the 3300 few years ago and went for the more expensive option as the room correction improvement was quite noticeable with my speakers.
My advice would be to always test different models with your speakers setup if you can. If you don't notice any sound difference then go for the cheaper option, because most likely you are using speakers that don't allow you to benefit of the upgrade.
asterix200001/12/2019 09:19

If you haven't compared both models I don't think it's fair to say that …If you haven't compared both models I don't think it's fair to say that the sound quality between the two models is similar. I compared the 2300 and the 3300 few years ago and went for the more expensive option as the room correction improvement was quite noticeable with my speakers. My advice would be to always test different models with your speakers setup if you can. If you don't notice any sound difference then go for the cheaper option, because most likely you are using speakers that don't allow you to benefit of the upgrade.


Well I have compared both models (at least, the 3400 vs the 2400 which are almost identical, just two years older). In a blind test I *guarantee* you couldn't tell the difference. Obviously the placebo effect is strong (the 3400 is double the cost 2400 so "I can clearly tell it sounds so much better in my living room")
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot01/12/2019 11:06

Well I have compared both models (at least, the 3400 vs the 2400 which are …Well I have compared both models (at least, the 3400 vs the 2400 which are almost identical, just two years older). In a blind test I *guarantee* you couldn't tell the difference. Obviously the placebo effect is strong (the 3400 is double the cost 2400 so "I can clearly tell it sounds so much better in my living room")


As I said if you can't tell the difference, then it makes sense to go for the cheaper option. Most people here would prefer saving some money after all However some others might be able to hear the difference, mostly because of the setup they're using and their room layout.
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot01/12/2019 11:06

Well I have compared both models (at least, the 3400 vs the 2400 which are …Well I have compared both models (at least, the 3400 vs the 2400 which are almost identical, just two years older). In a blind test I *guarantee* you couldn't tell the difference. Obviously the placebo effect is strong (the 3400 is double the cost 2400 so "I can clearly tell it sounds so much better in my living room")


I could tell a difference between the 2300 and 3300, both in pure audio. I'm assuming it will be the same here too.
Edited by: "rev6" 4th Dec 2019
rev604/12/2019 14:41

I could tell a difference between the 2300 and 3300, both in pure audio. …I could tell a difference between the 2300 and 3300, both in pure audio. I'm assuming it will be the same here too.



There's always a difference if (i) you don't have the settings exactly the same on both and (ii) you know which you're listening to (the placebo effect is strong).

But modern receivers have essentially solved the problem of how to get a basically accurate signal into the speakers and they all do it the same - cheap or expensive. The differences are only really detectable with monitoring equipment that is far more accurate than human ears can possibly be.
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot04/12/2019 21:57

There's always a difference if (i) you don't have the settings exactly the …There's always a difference if (i) you don't have the settings exactly the same on both and (ii) you know which you're listening to (the placebo effect is strong). But modern receivers have essentially solved the problem of how to get a basically accurate signal into the speakers and they all do it the same - cheap or expensive. The differences are only really detectable with monitoring equipment that is far more accurate than human ears can possibly be.


They were both identically setup. I was left to my own devices in richer sounds.
rev604/12/2019 22:00

They were both identically setup. I was left to my own devices in richer …They were both identically setup. I was left to my own devices in richer sounds.


And did you check that all the settings e.g. the EQ and room corrections settings were the same? And did you get someone else to help you do a blind test? And did you check that the switching equipment itself didn't introduce any problems (some audio shops put the cheaper product on the "worse" connector)?

Both receivers use the same DAC. The transformers on both are fine (obviously the more expensive one has a bit more power, but that's frankly marginal). Why would there even be a difference theoretically speaking given they advertise 0.02% THD or something around that level (which is totally undetectable)?

Bottom line - I would bet you a lot of money that in a true blind test you couldn't tell the difference :-)
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot04/12/2019 22:06

And did you check that all the settings e.g. the EQ and room corrections …And did you check that all the settings e.g. the EQ and room corrections settings were the same? And did you get someone else to help you do a blind test? And did you check that the switching equipment itself didn't introduce any problems (some audio shops put the cheaper product on the "worse" connector)?Both receivers use the same DAC. The transformers on both are fine (obviously the more expensive one has a bit more power, but that's frankly marginal). Why would there even be a difference theoretically speaking given they advertise 0.02% THD or something around that level (which is totally undetectable)? Bottom line - I would bet you a lot of money that in a true blind test you couldn't tell the difference :-)


They were on pure/direct mode. All that stuff is bypassed.

Like I said, I had control. All used the same cables. Tried Blu-ray's, USB,

I wanted to save money that's why I had the demo. I also tested a much more feature packed, albeit slightly cheaper Pioneer AV at the time. That was underwhelming. All direct mode.

It wasn't a distortion thing.
Edited by: "rev6" 4th Dec 2019
rev604/12/2019 22:13

They were on pure mode. All that stuff is bypassed.


And what about the blind test and the switch you were using? I know from personal experience that audio shops often (not always, but often) put the cheaper equipment on a worse switch - quick and dirty but successful trick. And what about the fact that the measurable THD with both receivers is so low that it would not be detectable to human ears and this is measurably and demonstrably true? But you're welcome to believe / hear what you want and if you believe one is better than the other, then who am I to argue?
Sir-Bargain-A-Lot04/12/2019 22:17

And what about the blind test and the switch you were using? I know from …And what about the blind test and the switch you were using? I know from personal experience that audio shops often (not always, but often) put the cheaper equipment on a worse switch - quick and dirty but successful trick. And what about the fact that the measurable THD with both receivers is so low that it would not be detectable to human ears and this is measurably and demonstrably true? But you're welcome to believe / hear what you want and if you believe one is better than the other, then who am I to argue?


What switch?
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