Digihome 32272SMHDLED 32" Smart LED TV £129.99 Delivered at Ebay/Co-op Electrical
432°Expired

Digihome 32272SMHDLED 32" Smart LED TV £129.99 Delivered at Ebay/Co-op Electrical

£129.99eBay Deals
69
Found 4th Dec 2014
Cheap and (hopefully cheerful) 32" Smart TV.
Digihome 32272SMHDLED 32" Smart LED TV with Freeview WiFi 1x USB 2x HDMI Ports
12 Months Manufacturers Guarantee

69 Comments

This TV any good? Need at 32" for playing Xbox

Original Poster

Don't know if its the same model, but a link to reviews on Argos
reviews.argos.co.uk/149…htm

Seems an excellent deal so heat added.
Unfortunately, they don't deliver, to Northern Ireland

Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or if it has been plugged in ???!!!

Original Poster

colinka

Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or … Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or if it has been plugged in ???!!!



That's only in the event that you change your mind with there being nothing wrong with the product.
If the product is defective then your statutory rights are not affected.

colinka

Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or … Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or if it has been plugged in ???!!!



I for one would love to see you plug it in without opening the box

Just ordered, bargain!!

The model with the reviews on Argos is most likely 32LEDFHDCTD975 which is FULL HD as opposed to this one which is HD ready (1366x768) and that is the dealbreaker for me.

colinka

Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or … Beware co-op will not accept any returns once the box has been opened or if it has been plugged in ???!!!



This is false. Even their return policy states

Distance Selling Regulations

If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you may cancel your order under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000, within 7 working days of delivery for an exchange or refund, even if you have opened the goods to inspect them, as long as you have taken reasonable care of the goods. To exercise your right under these regulations you must write to us at the address below or email us details of the product you wish to return.

Loving this website, just purchased this ! It's a great deal but I'll probably end up putting it up in the "garage" !!!!

Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the difference between hd ready and full hd? Sorry if that sounds thick but I'm not knowledgable when it comes to technology

shabbird

This is false. Even their return policy statesDistance Selling … This is false. Even their return policy statesDistance Selling RegulationsIf you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you may cancel your order under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000, within 7 working days of delivery for an exchange or refund, even if you have opened the goods to inspect them, as long as you have taken reasonable care of the goods. To exercise your right under these regulations you must write to us at the address below or email us details of the product you wish to return.



Yep, that's just standard blurb. Doesn't apply to anything you buy over t'interweb as you're pretty much buying it sight unseen. I've returned stuff under the Distance Selling Regulations before with no problems whatsoever.

beckyt30

Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the … Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the difference between hd ready and full hd? Sorry if that sounds thick but I'm not knowledgable when it comes to technology



HD Ready is 720
HD is 1080
And if you don't know the difference between HD and HD Ready, then you probably won't be bothered by the difference between them (although some people will doubtless disagree with me!)
Edited by: "simonspeakeasy" 4th Dec 2014

beckyt30

Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the … Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the difference between hd ready and full hd? Sorry if that sounds thick but I'm not knowledgable when it comes to technology



Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see a mix of HD Ready and Full HD TVs. They don’t sound very different, yet the way retailers use "HD Ready" makes it a terribly misleading name that needs changing – I’d call it "Half HD".

Far too many people buy these tellies and feel ripped off as they can hardly notice a difference with their picture. That isn’t particularly surprising when you realise what the phrase actually means.

Here’s a rough summary (and techies, I know I’m oversimplifying, but it’s to keep it simple):

Standard TV – in the UK it usually has 576 horizontal lines.
HD Ready – has a minimum 720 horizontal lines.
Full HD – has a minimum 1080 horizontal lines.
The higher the number of lines, the greater the density of the screen, so the higher the definition.

The difference between the minimum definition of Full HD and HD Ready is far bigger than the gap between HD Ready and the old, standard definition – so it’s little surprise people don’t notice too much of an improvement when upgrading. For the price can we really complain. Just bought one for our work, great price. Not a spec snob as far as the price is concerned, fit for purpose.

Thanks. Well I can get the full hd samsung from currys for the same price but only 24" which is full hd or this one which is obviously bigger. It's for my 11yr olds bedroom so guess she would prob opt for a bigger screen than a higher defined picture! Plus I believe this one can connect to wifi too for bbc I player etc is that correct?

beckyt30

Thanks. Well I can get the full hd samsung from currys for the same price … Thanks. Well I can get the full hd samsung from currys for the same price but only 24" which is full hd or this one which is obviously bigger. It's for my 11yr olds bedroom so guess she would prob opt for a bigger screen than a higher defined picture! Plus I believe this one can connect to wifi too for bbc I player etc is that correct?



24" should be fine for a bedroom. I was lucky to have a 14" TV when I was younger!
Edited by: "RustySpoons" 4th Dec 2014

I don't even need this but I have just bought one. LOL

Gerry that is a load of rubbish sorry. Anyone would find it very hard to tell the difference between a 720p and 1080p on a 32" tv. Also the difference between 576i and 720p is far far greater than the difference between 720p and 1080p. Almost all HD broadcasts in the U.K are 720p.

I would be more worried about the fact that this tv is not from maybe a reputable brand than it being 720p.

Gerry4400

Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see … Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see a mix of HD Ready and Full HD TVs. They don’t sound very different, yet the way retailers use "HD Ready" makes it a terribly misleading name that needs changing – I’d call it "Half HD".Far too many people buy these tellies and feel ripped off as they can hardly notice a difference with their picture. That isn’t particularly surprising when you realise what the phrase actually means.Here’s a rough summary (and techies, I know I’m oversimplifying, but it’s to keep it simple):Standard TV – in the UK it usually has 576 horizontal lines.HD Ready – has a minimum 720 horizontal lines.Full HD – has a minimum 1080 horizontal lines.The higher the number of lines, the greater the density of the screen, so the higher the definition. The difference between the minimum definition of Full HD and HD Ready is far bigger than the gap between HD Ready and the old, standard definition – so it’s little surprise people don’t notice too much of an improvement when upgrading. For the price can we really complain. Just bought one for our work, great price. Not a spec snob as far as the price is concerned, fit for purpose.

With reference to a 32" TV (or smaller) maybe the best non-technical summary would be that you would need the eyesight of an owl to notice any beneficial subjective improvement in the picture quality of any flavour of broadcast HDTV or bluray when viewed from typical viewing distances. Any difference may be more noticeable if used in computer monitor applications when the screen is less than a metre from the viewer. Not many people would chose to watch any flavour of HD content on a 32" screen at monitor viewing distances!

Original Poster

beckyt30

Thanks. Well I can get the full hd samsung from currys for the same price … Thanks. Well I can get the full hd samsung from currys for the same price but only 24" which is full hd or this one which is obviously bigger. It's for my 11yr olds bedroom so guess she would prob opt for a bigger screen than a higher defined picture! Plus I believe this one can connect to wifi too for bbc I player etc is that correct?



Yes, that's correct

Rustyspoons I know 24" will be ok but as I can get 32" for the same price and it's a smart tv and debating these features over brand, and confusing myself in the meantime lol

Gerry4400

Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see … Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see a mix of HD Ready and Full HD TVs. They don’t sound very different, yet the way retailers use "HD Ready" makes it a terribly misleading name that needs changing – I’d call it "Half HD".Far too many people buy these tellies and feel ripped off as they can hardly notice a difference with their picture. That isn’t particularly surprising when you realise what the phrase actually means.Here’s a rough summary (and techies, I know I’m oversimplifying, but it’s to keep it simple):Standard TV – in the UK it usually has 576 horizontal lines.HD Ready – has a minimum 720 horizontal lines.Full HD – has a minimum 1080 horizontal lines.The higher the number of lines, the greater the density of the screen, so the higher the definition. The difference between the minimum definition of Full HD and HD Ready is far bigger than the gap between HD Ready and the old, standard definition – so it’s little surprise people don’t notice too much of an improvement when upgrading. For the price can we really complain. Just bought one for our work, great price. Not a spec snob as far as the price is concerned, fit for purpose.


I think you'd notice the difference on 40 inch plus screens but unless you're sat really close to a 32 inch TV then I doubt you'd notice the difference to be honest. 720p (HD Ready) is more than enough on 32 inch TVs but if you're going bigger then I'd say definitely look for full HD as you will most definitely notice the difference.

Ordered, thanks for posting the deal.

Purchased thanks op

Does it come with stand n will I need a wifi dongle to connect to Internet ??

Original Poster

steveo73

Does it come with stand n will I need a wifi dongle to connect to … Does it come with stand n will I need a wifi dongle to connect to Internet ??



It has the integral 'stand' in the picture but not a separate cabinet/stand.
It has integrated wifi so no dongle required
Edited by: "colin1961" 4th Dec 2014

Rubbish as not free delivery to NI. We have Royal Mail too :-(

Colin many thanks so worth buying U think ??

Banned

Gerry4400

Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see … Pop into any TV shop or look on any site online right now, and you’ll see a mix of HD Ready and Full HD TVs. They don’t sound very different, yet the way retailers use "HD Ready" makes it a terribly misleading name that needs changing – I’d call it "Half HD".Far too many people buy these tellies and feel ripped off as they can hardly notice a difference with their picture. That isn’t particularly surprising when you realise what the phrase actually means.Here’s a rough summary (and techies, I know I’m oversimplifying, but it’s to keep it simple):Standard TV – in the UK it usually has 576 horizontal lines.HD Ready – has a minimum 720 horizontal lines.Full HD – has a minimum 1080 horizontal lines.The higher the number of lines, the greater the density of the screen, so the higher the definition. The difference between the minimum definition of Full HD and HD Ready is far bigger than the gap between HD Ready and the old, standard definition – so it’s little surprise people don’t notice too much of an improvement when upgrading. For the price can we really complain. Just bought one for our work, great price. Not a spec snob as far as the price is concerned, fit for purpose.


oh dear..

rhodricording

Gerry that is a load of rubbish sorry. Anyone would find it very hard to … Gerry that is a load of rubbish sorry. Anyone would find it very hard to tell the difference between a 720p and 1080p on a 32" tv. Also the difference between 576i and 720p is far far greater than the difference between 720p and 1080p. Almost all HD broadcasts in the U.K are 720p.I would be more worried about the fact that this tv is not from maybe a reputable brand than it being 720p.



Rhodric, I only cut and pasted after a quick google. Did'nt really read it fully just the jist of it. Should maybe have explained it better myself.

WillieGallimore

[quote=Gerry4400] [quote=beckyt30] Anyone know the screen resolution … [quote=Gerry4400] [quote=beckyt30] Anyone know the screen resolution doesn't seem to say. Also what's the difference between hd ready and full hd? Sorry if that sounds thick but I'm not knowledgable when it comes to technology



Was only a cut and paste from here, as I've explained I should have read the full article. blog.moneysavingexpert.com/201…ot/

Original Poster

steveo73

Colin many thanks so worth buying U think ??



If it does what you want then it's a very good price, so yes.

Cheers for your help Colin just purchased

Merry Christmas to U

Original Poster

steveo73

Cheers for your help Colin just purchased Merry Christmas to U



Thanks Steve - hope you're happy with it.
Have a good Christmas

great price but only hd ready is deal breaker for me.

Original Poster

sledwich

great price but only hd ready is deal breaker for me.



I'm no expert but the general opinion from previous comments in the thread is that on a 32" TV you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between Full HD and HD Ready

thanks, just bought one!

colin1961

I'm no expert but the general opinion from previous comments in the … I'm no expert but the general opinion from previous comments in the thread is that on a 32" TV you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between Full HD and HD Ready



I agree to a degree that a 32in will be a lot less noticeable. imho when I hook it up to a console, its more about having to reconfigure it each time I connect it to a 720p and 1080p screen. For example, I have a larger main screen which supports 1080p, I then hook up my console and it expects 1080p and needs to be reconfigured to work on a lower spec screen. The actual final screen does not look massively different, its just a bind when moving console around to different screens.

Distance selling regulations came to an end in June 2014

shabbird

This is false. Even their return policy statesDistance Selling … This is false. Even their return policy statesDistance Selling RegulationsIf you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you may cancel your order under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000, within 7 working days of delivery for an exchange or refund, even if you have opened the goods to inspect them, as long as you have taken reasonable care of the goods. To exercise your right under these regulations you must write to us at the address below or email us details of the product you wish to return.

Hmmm.... The brand meets my low standards but unless I'm mistaken and today is Black Friday then I'll not be kicking down doors of any supermarkets and trampling over my fellow human beings to purchase one of these. Abstaining from voting due to the aforementioned.
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