Dimplex DXDH10N 10ltr Dehumidifier £76 delivered (NEW not refurbished) @ Amazon
365°Expired

Dimplex DXDH10N 10ltr Dehumidifier £76 delivered (NEW not refurbished) @ Amazon

40
Found 24th Aug 2013
The cheapest dehumidifier of this type and quality I can find. Amazon has reduced the price as I had it in my basket from last week to purchase.
The cheapest I can find this model for is £109.99 new, the cheapest new one on ebay is £116.95.
Even refurbished models are going for more than this on ebay and amazon.

40 Comments

heat, will be useful in the colder weather in the dog's room.

So what does modern science say atm about these. Do they work?

Original Poster

great if you dry clothes in the house, have re-plastered walls, have a condensation problem etc.

Not bad but if you have a problem with damp you're better getting something from Ebac.

These are great but use a lot of power.

This was tested by Which tail end of last year and is a Don't Buy. Best spending the extra on a Ebac.

Thanks OP I just ordered one.

Gball

Not bad but if you have a problem with damp you're better getting … Not bad but if you have a problem with damp you're better getting something from Ebac.



I've had endless problems with ebac. Had to get it changed three times and finally gave up. I was lucky that I bought it from Argos and was able to return it.

We bought this one last year and it does a great job.

could someone explain what is this??

I got one of these last year for a similarly low price. It works okay. Not very quick so you have to leave it on for quite a long time, and they do use a lot of power. The main advantage of this model is the small size. I stuck it up in the loft once it had done the job I bought it for. I'm now the person in the family who has one and lend it out a lot :D. If you have a serious damp problem, or are using it to dry out a lot of plastering then I would probably hire something more powerful.

Thanks, OP. ordered. But 2-4 weeks delivery time.

I got an ebac from eBay few days ago the powerdri 21 came with 4 of the 5 year free warranty git it running in cellar and its doing a top job even after just two days its far warmer and drier already taking out approx 7 litres a day . Ebac still have their free 5 year warranty running on the website now

James777

This was tested by Which tail end of last year and is a Don't Buy. Best … This was tested by Which tail end of last year and is a Don't Buy. Best spending the extra on a Ebac.



Thanks for pointing that out. Which? are quite clear on it - they say don't buy it. It's quiet, they say, but probably because it's not doing much!

And that stacks up with a lot of the reviews on Amazon - it doesn't extract much water.

Best avoided.

A lot of dehumidifers on the market seem to be designed for use outside of the UK - dealing with really high humidity and higher temperatures. The operating point of the Ebac ones means they work down to 5degC-ish, and still extract some water with the RH at about 75%.

I don't know about this Delonghi one though.

Our Ebac is now 5 years old and has run a lot. It has been replaced 3 times though - one time it failed to switch on at all, appeared to be the control board. Another time the fan wouldn't reliably start . Last time the compressor failed to work. They've collected it and replaced it within a week, but it does mean that 5 year warranty is likely needed.

The construction quality inside the Ebac isn't great - the soldering on the pipes isn't neat, there was a kink in the capillary tube, the fins on the heat exchanger are bashed and bent.

I have this exact dehumidifier and it's great.

It doesn't use that much energy (around 40w according to my energy monitor).

And if I leave it on overnight next to a clothes-horse full of soaking wet clothes, they're bone dry by the morning!

As my house is quite small, I also use it in the bedroom to reduce humidity and mould build-up and prevent my clothes wardrobe going 'sticky' after I've had a shower.
Edited by: "preecey" 25th Aug 2013

Mitsubishi dehumidifiers ftw

If it's only using 40W, it's not going to be working very well. A cold hard fact of dehumidification is that it uses a lot of power. Things can be marginally more or less efficient but not using less than one quarter of nameplate rating and working right.

cybergibbons

If it's only using 40W, it's not going to be working very well. A cold … If it's only using 40W, it's not going to be working very well. A cold hard fact of dehumidification is that it uses a lot of power. Things can be marginally more or less efficient but not using less than one quarter of nameplate rating and working right.


If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its job.

The only downside to this dehumidifier, after using it for over 18 months, is that it is quite heavy. You have to exercise caution when carrying it up or down stairs, in case you drop it.
Edited by: "preecey" 25th Aug 2013

cybergibbons

If it's only using 40W, it's not going to be working very well. A cold … If it's only using 40W, it's not going to be working very well. A cold hard fact of dehumidification is that it uses a lot of power. Things can be marginally more or less efficient but not using less than one quarter of nameplate rating and working right.


If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its job.

Original Poster

preecey

If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its … If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its job.

It also has a continuous drain facility if required by attaching a hose, obviously the hose will then need a outlet to drain to.
I have been looking for a dehumidifier for a while and looked at lots of reviews from people, there will always be some poor reviews but it seems to me this generally gets a thumbs up from the majority of purchasers.

preecey

If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its … If I have to empty the 2.3 litre tank every day, it's obviously doing its job.



You're having much more success with this than most people - I'm guessing that's only when the room's warm? These things extract very little in a cooler environment.

Newbold

You're having much more success with this than most people - I'm guessing … You're having much more success with this than most people - I'm guessing that's only when the room's warm? These things extract very little in a cooler environment.


My house is 20°c on average in summer, 17-18°c in winter.

If it's filling the tank every day, it's using more than 40W on average.

cybergibbons

If it's filling the tank every day, it's using more than 40W on average.


Could be, but I haven't noticed a significant rise in my electricity bills since buying it. Bear in mind the energy monitor I use is a cheap British Gas one, so it can't be completely accurate then.

I've read the same re the poor reviews when I was in the market for a Dehumidifier. The model I went for was a Meaco Junior 8 Litre Dehumidifier DD8LJ. Brilliant reviews and depending on the environment can end up emptying the tank a few times a day

Expired

ukbilleh

I've read the same re the poor reviews when I was in the market for a … I've read the same re the poor reviews when I was in the market for a Dehumidifier. The model I went for was a Meaco Junior 8 Litre Dehumidifier DD8LJ. Brilliant reviews and depending on the environment can end up emptying the tank a few times a day



The Meacos do seem well reviewed - thanks. Worth a look. (_;)

Original Poster

blackmail2005

Expired

not expired, still available, order from amazon direct

It's 250Watt per hour according to the specs, meaning it uses a quarter of a KW (1000W) for every hour it is in use.
So say that you pay around 16p (rough figure, check your bill) per Kilowatt of electricity.
This will cost you around 4p per hour to run.

*the above prices are just a rough guide, you may be paying more or less per KW... Check your bill

Not expired -still definitely available!

Ive got one of these units at home, and as long as you arent trying to run it in stupidly cold environments (aka using it inside your house not in an outbuilding) it works just fine - I empty mine approx every other day on the setting i have it at. If set to higher it fills every day.
Ran it non stop when we had a few rooms plastered, and it filled up very quickly.

Its also worth noting that the continuous drain function can work either via a pipe (and go indefinitely) OR you can set it to continuous and use the built in tank - when the tank is full the dehumidifier stops automatically until its emptied - handy for (as mentioned) when you want to dry an entire room out!

Yes, you can get an ebac or meaco that are arguably better, but NOT at this price.
Edited by: "vrykyl" 25th Aug 2013

stin

It's 250Watt per hour according to the specs, meaning it uses a quarter … It's 250Watt per hour according to the specs, meaning it uses a quarter of a KW (1000W) for every hour it is in use.So say that you pay around 16p (rough figure, check your bill) per Kilowatt of electricity.This will cost you around 4p per hour to run.*the above prices are just a rough guide, you may be paying more or less per KW... Check your bill



They do tend to run on a humidistat, so arenn't on all the time. But the compressor is either on or off - and it will use the rated nameplate value when on. 40W sounds like just the fan.

Banned

Not surprised it went hot at that price though on review most people say it's rubbish.

You pays your money and takes your choice.

Banned

Everybody says rubbish quality of build & performance, spend more eg on Ebac.

williebiz

Everybody says rubbish quality of build & performance, spend more eg on … Everybody says rubbish quality of build & performance, spend more eg on Ebac.


From the reports I read, Ebac quality's no better! Probably worse in fact.

amirashu

could someone explain what is this??



Its a device that takes the moisture out of the air and collects in a bottle/tank.

They are used in homes that suffer damp, condensation on your windows during winter and will help keep the moisture in the room down if your drying laundry indoors.

I got one of these last year. Use it mainly in winter when windows and doors are closed but need to dry clothes on a clothes airer.

If you just use it for an hour or two it doesn't collect much; but leave it running and I'd say it needs emptying every other day; just depends how damp your house is I guess.

Neat and tucks away in the corner.

I found this deal 10 months ago, at which time best price was £104 from Tesco, so this is a steal.
hotukdeals.com/dea…157

These work, BUT the point of condenstion & mould is trapped water filled air, which means you have an underlying problem which needs fixing, a de-humidifier is like sticking a plaster over a weeping sore, it will help but wont sort it out.

Crack your windows open 5 ml, vent when there is steam in a kitchen (& when there isn't) ..look around your property & problem areas outside for cracks in mortar / brickwork, these potentially suck wet in, sort it seal it & remove the excess, look at keeping a defined amount of humidity not excess (go find some graphs & understand the balance).

Insulate your homes but ensure there is ventilation too! , check that your loft insulation isn't blocking eaves for example (should be 50mm away).

If you have an ongoing problem to a lesser extent then a good quality waterseal (thomsons) which go's on clear compared to cheaper types (eg b&Q) which discolours brickwork with cloudiness, whilst it wont cure the problem it will impede the transition of external to internal vapour & is a very cheap belt & braces job for any adult to carry out easily, always worth a go before you bother a builder with plenty of damp solving experience.

Check your DPM, is there anything breaching the coursing, eg earth piled in places against it?
A proper chemical for this is from a specialist manufacturing firm such as soverign chemicals here

If you have a chimney, fit a decent cowl to it, check & clean gutters & downpipes.
make sure your tumble drier is properly vented to the outside, & interior vents are not blocked, or are unblocked when using steam / vapour inducing implements & for a good while afterwards.

OR maybe if exterior walls are in good nick consider a green deal for exterior insulation, especially in a bungalow where there is les metreage to deal with.

If you are forever struggling with a 250W power consumption to expel water vapour you need to up your game, that's pricey to run day in day out, & a permanent fix is required, go ask at eco renovation forums / renewables forums as these folk have a plethora of experience.

Start with "belt & braces" thompsons water seal at around £22 for 5 litres, the sort of thing to use a wallpaper brush (not roller) on & a small container to dip into it & push the fluid into exterior walls, high VOC so ventilation in use mandatory (you'll be outside but it can get headachey after a while.

real value for money to shore up & slow down problem areas of ingress as well ashelp keep it out, really recommended, otherwise spend £100+ trying to sort the wall with a decent pro-grade chemical top coat, scrub down & clean your mould areas internally & if really bad prepare to strip it back sort & replace the plaster / plasterboard in order to seal & start afresh with a cleaned & repaired area.

Soveriegn are the type of company a regular firm would charge you a lot more for exactly the same, so may as well sort it yourself, a few months of the humidifier on is the cost of hopefully resolving the problem by looking at the sources.

NB condenstion will often be in the coldest least heated areas or utility areas (steam), because heat rises & causes vapour, all bedrooms ought to be aired through & ideally have an air perimeter (ie stuff not up against the exterior walls, allow airflow which aids mould limitation & drying.

brickwork dries at around 1mm per month as I recall, so it's a fight to sort it before it gets soaked, & understand the time factor to remove the problem.

don't ignore it, don't wholly rely on a dehumidifier.
Hope this helps
(ps, not an expert, diyer, & reader but these are typical basics, I also have a damp problem & have applied a few basics as above, the moisture content is coming down, as I measure it frequently I notice the seasonal aspects).

several things, kettles, I boil up a full kettle at a time & stay by it so it's not pouring steam into the kitchen, whilst having the adjacent window open for the duration of boiling & beyond, then pour into several good thermos flasks, saving electricity on reboils & more moisture output, ..it works.

secondly DOWNLIGHTERS =BAD. this is because they allow rapid transit (steam rising) through to the next floor without delay, thus upping the amount of moisture going to upper non or less heated rooms which may be sealed off! ..not good.

Will cap them & change toeither sealed units with a fire stop or fill the holes altogether & have ceiling mounted lights not ones cut into the ceiling, this affects the draughtproofing considerably, screw fashion, this is about heat, vapour, draught & condensate.

This is handy for understanding Air moisture holding capacity but you do HAVE to read it & understand it! ..(picture graphs so not hard)

Here

This is handy for understanding Air moisture holding capacity but you do HAVE to read it & understand it! ..(picture graphs so not hard)

engineeringtoolbox.com/moi…tml
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