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Drink? The Science of Alcohol and your Health - Dr David Nutt. Kindle Ed - Now 99p @ Amazon
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Drink? The Science of Alcohol and your Health - Dr David Nutt. Kindle Ed - Now 99p @ Amazon

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Posted 2nd Jul

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I’ve always quite admired Dr Nutt. Whether I agree with him on some issues or not, he likes to discuss what others avoid.

Dr Nutt owns a wine bar in Ealing and launched this book there in January

Product Description:

Alcohol - a simple molecule that can induce so much pleasure and pain at the same time... As the most harmful drug in the UK, it has a profound and wide-reaching impact on our health and on society at large. Drink? is the first book of its kind, written by a scientist and rooted in 40 years of medical research and hands-on experience treating patients. Professor David Nutt cuts through the noise to explain the long- and short-term effects of alcohol, makes complex science digestible and takes readers through its journey inside the body and brain from the very first sip.

Drink? holds the key to all the questions you want to know the answers to, covering mental health, sleep, hormones, fertility and addiction. It sheds light on what 'responsible drinking' truly means and equips us with the essential knowledge we all need to make rational, informed decisions about our consumption now and in the future.

About the Author:

David Nutt is Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology and director of the Neuropsychopharmacology Unit in the Division of Brain Sciences at Imperial College, London.

After completing his medical training at Guy's Hospital London, continuing in neurology to MRCP, he went on to his psychiatric training in Oxford, he continued there as a lecturer and then later as a Wellcome Senior Fellow in psychiatry. He then spent two years as Chief of the Section of Clinical Science in the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in NIH, Bethesda, USA. On returning to England in 1988 he set up the Psychopharmacology Unit in Bristol University, an interdisciplinary research grouping spanning the departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology before moving to Imperial College London in December 2008 where he leads a similar group with a particular focus on brain imaging especially PET.

David is currently Chair of DrugScience (formally the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs (ISCD) and President of the European Brain Council. previously he has been President of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP). In addition, he is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and of Psychiatrists and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He is also the UK Director of the European Certificate and Masters in Affective Disorders Courses and a member of the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy. He has edited the Journal of Psychopharmacology for over two decades and acts as the psychiatry drugs advisor to the British National Formulary.

Previously he has been a member and then Chair of the Advisory Committee on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD - 1998-2009), a member of the HEFCE/NHS Senior Lecturer Selection Panel and of the MRC Neuroscience Board. Other previous national contributions include serving as the medical expert on the Independent Inquiry into the Misuse of Drugs Act (2000 Runciman report), and membership of the Committee on Safety of Medicines, the Committee on NHS drugs and the Ministry of Defence Science Advisory Board. He was the clinical scientific lead on the 2004/5 UK Government Foresight initiative "Brain science, addiction and drugs" that provided a 25-year vision for this area of science and public policy.

David broadcasts widely to the general public both on radio and television including BBC science and public affairs programmes on therapeutic as well as illicit drugs, their harms and their classification. He also lecturers widely to the public as well as to the scientific and medical communities; he has presented three time at the Cheltenham Science Festival and several times for Café Scientifiques.
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It's quite a sobering read (sorry) when you start to realise all the ways in which alcohol can negatively affect you with very few positives. Also, that when considering the impact of others, alcohol is by far the most dangerous drug but the government has done little to intervene save to protect the drinks industry. Well worth reading.
Edited by: "ukwestspeed" 2nd Jul
What a guy. The truth about alcohol. I'd believe what he told me before any government official. Alcohol is all great fun before it is not. Can happen to anyone given a set of circumstances. If you are drinking too much do something about it before it it gains control and strips layers from you.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a drink since March and can honestly say I don’t feel any better for it
47 Comments
I admire him . I hope his book has practical aspects as he is on committee and these guys avoid the frontline generally.
I will read it , but not report here...but amazon reviews.
Edited by: "7day" 2nd Jul
First thing I read that made a point was this ‘According to the Global Drug Survey, Britons get drunk and average of 51.1 times a year - that is once a week...’

yep that’s me.

And ‘One in ten adults are drunk on five or more days a week’ thankfully not me.
7day02/07/2020 07:24

I admire him . I hope his book has practical aspects as he is on committee …I admire him . I hope his book has practical aspects as he is on committee and these guys avoid the frontline generally. I will read it , but not report here...but amazon reviews.


Just started and I can tell I will read the whole of this book
What a guy. The truth about alcohol. I'd believe what he told me before any government official. Alcohol is all great fun before it is not. Can happen to anyone given a set of circumstances. If you are drinking too much do something about it before it it gains control and strips layers from you.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
The author is a Nutt.

It had to be said.
Predikuesi02/07/2020 07:37

The author is a Nutt.It had to be said.


I bet he got loads of grief when he was at primary school for that surname.
It's quite a sobering read (sorry) when you start to realise all the ways in which alcohol can negatively affect you with very few positives. Also, that when considering the impact of others, alcohol is by far the most dangerous drug but the government has done little to intervene save to protect the drinks industry. Well worth reading.
Edited by: "ukwestspeed" 2nd Jul
I can recommend a website called one year no beer for those wishing to take a tactical break from alcohol. Doesn't necessarily mean a whole year without booze, but it offers great tips on how you can abstain. I did 100 days and it was an eye opener!
cackinthesackjac02/07/2020 08:14

I can recommend a website called one year no beer for those wishing to …I can recommend a website called one year no beer for those wishing to take a tactical break from alcohol. Doesn't necessarily mean a whole year without booze, but it offers great tips on how you can abstain. I did 100 days and it was an eye opener!


Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after the first month I never thought about it much. I know that I have an enlarged prostate caused by 25 years of boozing. That's why I stopped. Now I have to live with the medical consequences of my drinking habits.
Edited £250 to join nobeerforayear.com
YOU MUST BE BONKERS
Edited by: "ciarandanielbyrne1" 2nd Jul
its an eyeopener when you you realise how much the alcohol industry has brainwashed us!
Professor Nutt was the same chap who said that taking ecstasy was less of a threat to public health than drinking and got fired as the Government's chief advisor. Not saying or wishing to debate whether he was right or wrong, but it certainly did lead to the hilarious headline "NUTT FACES SACK"
ross.wilkinson02/07/2020 09:04

Professor Nutt was the same chap who said that taking ecstasy was less of …Professor Nutt was the same chap who said that taking ecstasy was less of a threat to public health than drinking and got fired as the Government's chief advisor. Not saying or wishing to debate whether he was right or wrong, but it certainly did lead to the hilarious headline "NUTT FACES SACK"


Yes that’s him!
ross.wilkinson02/07/2020 09:04

Professor Nutt was the same chap who said that taking ecstasy was less of …Professor Nutt was the same chap who said that taking ecstasy was less of a threat to public health than drinking and got fired as the Government's chief advisor. Not saying or wishing to debate whether he was right or wrong, but it certainly did lead to the hilarious headline "NUTT FACES SACK"


Yep - that's some headline!!!
Not read this, but about 15 months ago I read (well, listened to) a book called The Alcohol Experiment, which guides the reader (listener) through 30 days off the drink. I’ve not had a drink since. I’ve not given up alcohol, but don’t know when I’ll drink it again.
ciarandanielbyrne102/07/2020 08:23

Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after …Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after the first month I never thought about it much. I know that I have an enlarged prostate caused by 25 years of boozing. That's why I stopped. Now I have to live with the medical consequences of my drinking habits.Edited £250 to join nobeerforayear.com YOU MUST BE BONKERS



Just for the sake of not worrying people unduly I thought I would mention that there is no scientific evidence alcohol causes an enlarged prostate. Some people find it makes this common ailment worse, some find alcohol makes it less troublesome. It is almost always caused by a male sex hormone. How do you "know"...who gave you the information, if it was a doctor you need to have a further chat with them!
I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a drink since March and can honestly say I don’t feel any better for it
snoopy1802/07/2020 10:37

I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a …I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a drink since March and can honestly say I don’t feel any better for it


Can take a lot longer to feel better stick with it. Gets worse as you get older so be warned and vulnerable to more binges if something tragic happens as it does in life. I've Same story as you regarding intake. Keep improving you diet, drink water twice the recommend daily amount and look at taking a vitamin and mineral supplement. Most importantly of all don't go back but if you do start again. Eventually you get there and see the huge benefit. This book is a great way to change the mindset and open the eyes of you are open minded enough to read.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
snoopy1802/07/2020 10:37

I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a …I’ve been a binge weekend drinker for last 30 years and I haven’t touched a drink since March and can honestly say I don’t feel any better for it


Then perfect opportunity this weekend to hit the boozers! Ive got my booze up session booked to start 9am Sat pub to pub till I pass out woohoo
Edited by: "tikibeach" 2nd Jul
LanzaJet02/07/2020 10:41

Can take a lot longer to feel better stick with it. Gets worse as you get …Can take a lot longer to feel better stick with it. Gets worse as you get older so be warned and vulnerable to more binges if something tragic happens as it does in life. I've Same story as you regarding intake. Keep improving you diet, drink water twice the recommend daily amount and look at taking a vitamin and mineral supplement. Most importantly of all don't go back but if you do start again. Eventually you get there and see the huge benefit. This book is a great way to change the mindset and open the eyes of you are open minded enough to read.


That second sentence sounds so negative to me.
The warning, something tragic always happens, wtf.
I don’t want to change, I enjoy a social drink and won’t be reading a book like this.
snoopy1802/07/2020 11:09

That second sentence sounds so negative to me. The warning, something …That second sentence sounds so negative to me. The warning, something tragic always happens, wtf. I don’t want to change, I enjoy a social drink and won’t be reading a book like this.


It's just fact of life but meaning to sound negative. Drinking is a great way to sail through such events. Sorry if I have upset you. The loss of my Brother was a big trigger point for me and drinking was the worst thing I could have done looking back. We all lose loved ones (tragic) and my comment was a warning to others. Maybe some people will be in a similar situation but I can't tailor to the mass mind. These are my own experiences. I am not a negative person unless I had a hangover.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
LanzaJet02/07/2020 11:12

It's just fact of life but meaning to sound negative. Drinking is a great …It's just fact of life but meaning to sound negative. Drinking is a great way to sail through such events. Sorry if I have upset you.


No need to apologise, you haven’t upset me.
I just don’t agree it’s a fact of life.
My dad is 91, very fit for his age, no health issues and has always drank and still does.
Everything in moderation.
snoopy1802/07/2020 11:16

No need to apologise, you haven’t upset me. I just don’t agree it’s a fact …No need to apologise, you haven’t upset me. I just don’t agree it’s a fact of life. My dad is 91, very fit for his age, no health issues and has always drank and still does. Everything in moderation.


My Mum 81 and the same in fact smoked until she was about 60. I will still be devastated when she's gone even if she lived to 100. I agree with what you say but not everyone can moderate it can be a disease. In fact it can turn into one with triggers (trigger a better word than tragic). Trigger could be as simple as losing your job doesn't have to be a "tragic" event. It's something you can "slip" into as I did and I didn't know I was even doing it.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
LanzaJet02/07/2020 11:20

My Mum 81 and the same in fact smoked until she was about 60. I will still …My Mum 81 and the same in fact smoked until she was about 60. I will still be devastated when she's gone even if she lived to 100. I agree with what you say but not everyone can moderate it can be a disease. In fact it can turn into one with triggers (trigger a better word than tragic).


Yes no way of preparing for losing your mum, just try to enjoy the time they are here. That’s all you can do.
Yes it hurts like hell, and without alcohol I would have struggled to get through that day. It was my crutch.
snoopy1802/07/2020 11:28

Yes no way of preparing for losing your mum, just try to enjoy the time …Yes no way of preparing for losing your mum, just try to enjoy the time they are here. That’s all you can do. Yes it hurts like hell, and without alcohol I would have struggled to get through that day. It was my crutch.


Thanks for that. That's my aim for mindset now and I treasure seeing her happy. Same with my Brother I hit the beer and felt like he was still here. We all get bad days but for me the booze was making them worse. Two would become three and then eight not sure what I was even thinking but I thought I knew. Music always sounded so much better and I do miss that

25 years of happy times drinking (mainly in Lanzarote) and then I just couldn't do it anymore. I miss it but I don't.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
LanzaJet02/07/2020 11:33

Thanks for that. That's my aim for mindset now and I treasure seeing her …Thanks for that. That's my aim for mindset now and I treasure seeing her happy. Same with my Brother I hit the beer and felt like he was still here. We all get bad days but for me the booze was making them worse. Two would become three and then eight not sure what I was even thinking but I thought I knew. Music always sounded so much better and I do miss that (lol)25 years of happy times drinking (mainly in Lanzarote) and then I just couldn't do it anymore. I miss it but I don't.


It certainly does make the bad days darker.
Yes, it certainly makes your favourite music sound great
I’m totally in control of it luckily, no pubs for me this weekend
LanzaJet02/07/2020 11:12

It's just fact of life but meaning to sound negative. Drinking is a great …It's just fact of life but meaning to sound negative. Drinking is a great way to sail through such events. Sorry if I have upset you. The loss of my Brother was a big trigger point for me and drinking was the worst thing I could have done looking back. We all lose loved ones (tragic) and my comment was a warning to others. Maybe some people will be in a similar situation but I can't tailor to the mass mind. These are my own experiences. I am not a negative person unless I had a hangover.


Totally agree with you. I used alcohol as a crutch when I lost my mum 10 years ago. It takes hold of you when you least expect it to. Now I rarely drink.
M_z02/07/2020 07:53

I bet he got loads of grief when he was at primary school for that surname.


So did I... I remember when I was in year 7 some older kid came up to me and said “When you get a letter does it say Master Bates?” I said yes and he ran off laughing... all little innocent me didn’t have a clue at the time
LanzaJet02/07/2020 11:33

Thanks for that. That's my aim for mindset now and I treasure seeing her …Thanks for that. That's my aim for mindset now and I treasure seeing her happy. Same with my Brother I hit the beer and felt like he was still here. We all get bad days but for me the booze was making them worse. Two would become three and then eight not sure what I was even thinking but I thought I knew. Music always sounded so much better and I do miss that (lol)25 years of happy times drinking (mainly in Lanzarote) and then I just couldn't do it anymore. I miss it but I don't.



I suffer with PTSD and I drink once or twice a week inc with the medication. It makes me feel better at the time but it’s circle that you don’t want to get into. I wouldn’t call it selfish but it can affect other people. It is certainly self-serving. Unfortunately I can’t see it changing but I’m hoping this book will make me see it from a different perspective.
batezy02/07/2020 11:57

I suffer with PTSD and I drink once or twice a week inc with the …I suffer with PTSD and I drink once or twice a week inc with the medication. It makes me feel better at the time but it’s circle that you don’t want to get into. I wouldn’t call it selfish but it can affect other people. It is certainly self-serving. Unfortunately I can’t see it changing but I’m hoping this book will make me see it from a different perspective.

I see what you say as real now but my word it took me ages to realise what I was doing as it seemed like it was all good. And why not if it made me feel better even for a few hours. The feeling tapered off slowly and then it literally became the norm, a part of life. I look back and don't even know myself as me, after all everyone does it and that's what you believe or at least your mind tells you that and then blow it I'll get a four pack.
Edited by: "LanzaJet" 2nd Jul
ciarandanielbyrne102/07/2020 08:23

Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after …Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after the first month I never thought about it much. I know that I have an enlarged prostate caused by 25 years of boozing. That's why I stopped. Now I have to live with the medical consequences of my drinking habits.Edited £250 to join nobeerforayear.com YOU MUST BE BONKERS


Do you not mean oneyearnobeer.com ? I guess you could say £250- is very little compared to what you could save going without booze for a year
ciarandanielbyrne102/07/2020 08:23

Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after …Cheers for the info i will check it out. I'm on week 38 alcohol free after the first month I never thought about it much. I know that I have an enlarged prostate caused by 25 years of boozing. That's why I stopped. Now I have to live with the medical consequences of my drinking habits.Edited £250 to join nobeerforayear.com YOU MUST BE BONKERS


I know it's pricey! I actually didnt pay for the subscription but I used Facebook groups and listened to their podcasts. There's a very good one with Dr Rangan Chatergee which is very informative.
First thing you need to realise about Nutt is he is not independent. He is backed by major drugs companies and what he says and researches depends on his paymasters. Nutt has been heavily involved in marketting a drug alternative to alcohol and his "research" is largely focussed on that. When he sits on various boards it is not as an neutral, unbiased scientific professional. He sits on them as the public face of the drug companies.

He was sacked because what he said was nonsense. It appealed to drug takers but you cannot say drugs were less harmful than alcohol. They are equally harmful and if you know drug addicts you will realise they are just as much a danger to themselves and to others as the majority of alcoholics are.
Edited by: "fiqqer" 2nd Jul
LanzaJet02/07/2020 12:13

I see what you say as real now but my word it took me ages to realise what …I see what you say as real now but my word it took me ages to realise what I was doing as it seemed like it was all good. And why not if it made me feel better even for a few hours. The feeling tapered off slowly and then it literally became the norm, a part of life. I look back and don't even know myself as me, after all everyone does it and that's what you believe or at least your mind tells you that and then blow it I'll get a four pack.


Mate I don’t drink every day for this very reason. My dad is in the habit of drinking every night. Normally 4 cans of Carling on a week day and 8 on a Friday. But he is in good health and has done this forever. I think a lot of how things affect you are down to genetics. The truth is you don’t know what impact your lifestyle has until you die. I think if I live past 75 with no major physical health conditions I’d be happy with that. Even at my age (36) I’ve known so many relatively fit friends die of various things so I think you just have to count your lucky stars once in a while
Edited by: "batezy" 15th Jul
Predikuesi02/07/2020 07:37

The author is a Nutt.It had to be said.


The author is as honest as you can get and has a science based approach, it's the UK Government that is totally nuts.
fiqqer02/07/2020 13:39

First thing you need to realise about Nutt is he is not independent. He …First thing you need to realise about Nutt is he is not independent. He is backed by major drugs companies and what he says and researches depends on his paymasters. Nutt has been heavily involved in marketting a drug alternative to alcohol and his "research" is largely focussed on that. When he sits of on various boards it is not as an neutral, unbiased scientific professional. He sits on them as a representative of the drug companies.He was sacked because what he said was nonsense. It appealed to drug takers but you cannot say drugs were less harmful than alcohol. They are equally harmful and if you know drug addicts you will realise they are just as much a danger to themselves and to others as the majority of alcoholics are.


Can you post your sources for this information that he's not independent, so we can verify them please.
batezy02/07/2020 16:53

Mate I don’t drink every day for this very reason. My dad is in the habit o …Mate I don’t drink every day for this very reason. My dad is in the habit of drinking every night. Normally 4 cans of Carling on a week day and 8 on a Friday. But he is in good health and has done this forever. I think a lot of how things affect you are down to genetics. The truth is you don’t know what impact your lifestyle has until you die. I think if I live past 75 with no major physical health conditions I’d be happy with that. Even at my age (36) I’ve known so many relative fit and fit friends die of various things so I think you just have to count your lucky stars once in a while


Human Biology isn't just complex, it's so complex that humans really don't understand most of it.

biochemical-pathways.com/

biochemical-pathways.com/

That's just a very small example of the complexity.

There's a book with more of the pathways and I've read about pathways that don't exist in the book >

amazon.co.uk/Bio…8-1

Also pathways work differently in different sites in the body. It doesn't help that the media simplify it to absurdity, which is why people think Serotonin is the neurotransmitter of happiness, when in fact the Serotonin system in the brain comprises of a family of known receptor systems 5HT1 to 5HT7, Serotonin also affects gut mobility, and there's as many Serotonin receptors in the gut aws there are in the brain. Dopamine isn't the neurotransmitter of compulsiveness or addiction, that is just simplifying its purpose to absurdity. I can go on but you get the picture. Humans simply do not have the capability currently to understand this complexity, also researchers have their own agendas and skewed data which further complicates things.

It is possible that humans will cease to exist before we understand all there is to know about human biochemistry.

People would assume that we know every structure and chemical in the human body, but we don't. In the last 3 - 5 years we've discovered Rosehip neurons in the brain in August 2018 and the Endorestiform nucleus in the brain also in 2018.

en.wikipedia.org/wik…ron

en.wikipedia.org/wik…eus

The 18 Kilo Dalton Translocator protein (TSPO) which is something I'm particularly interested in, has it's 3D Crystalline structure modelled in 2014, before that we didn't know the structure.

Once you add in genetics and the complexity there you'd need way more supercomputing power than currently available and much smarter AI to work through the data.

Human Biochemistry is unbelievably complex, and I even understate this immensely.

Scientists do have a sense of humour, there's a signalling pathway in the human body called

en.wikipedia.org/wik…way

Named after Sonic the Hedgehog.
fishmaster02/07/2020 17:16

Can you post your sources for this information that he's not independent, …Can you post your sources for this information that he's not independent, so we can verify them please.


Read about Nutt's role in 2 drugs that mimic alcohol and his patents. Nowhere in his publicity does he declare his backers, his associations with the drug companies or his role in any of this. That is definitely not scientific. The lack of science in his arguments was the reason why he was sacked. He was leading a science based approach to drug classification which was not at all scientific.

vice.com/en_…ers

Also undeclared links to drug companies pages 187 and 188 of 2004 House of Commons Health Committee evidence report: The issue here is because he does not declare his links - even when it is obvious such as with the alcohol replacement drugs, it is very difficult to find that information. For me it means he is not independent and what he says cannot be trusted. The first thing you are taught in science - even in social science is to declare your links and associations.

books.google.co.uk/boo…QAg
Edited by: "fiqqer" 2nd Jul
fiqqer02/07/2020 17:34

Read about Nutt's role in 2 drugs that mimic alcohol and his patents. …Read about Nutt's role in 2 drugs that mimic alcohol and his patents. Nowhere in his publicity does he declare his backers, his associations with the drug companies or his role in any of this. That is definitely not scientific. The lack of science in his arguments was the reason why he was sacked.https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/vvxkd8/this-professor-has-invented-a-pill-that-eliminates-hangovers


When you look on pubmed and other scientific resources you always should look for conflict of interest. The issue I have with that Vice article is there are zero links to any resources, there are not citations to back up their claims. The Vice article has no credibility if it can't cite credible sources, at a bare minimum there have to be links to back up each claim they make, and they only supply some and in the body of the article without a footer summary. Don't get me wrong though when there's humans involved there's usually an agenda.
fishmaster02/07/2020 17:31

Human Biology isn't just complex, it's so complex that humans really don't …Human Biology isn't just complex, it's so complex that humans really don't understand most of it. http://biochemical-pathways.com/#/map/1http://biochemical-pathways.com/#/map/2That's just a very small example of the complexity. There's a book with more of the pathways and I've read about pathways that don't exist in the book >https://www.amazon.co.uk/Biochemical-Pathways-Biochemistry-Molecular-Biology-ebook/dp/B00BQZM4D4/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=biochemical+pathways&qid=1593706698&sr=8-1Also pathways work differently in different sites in the body. It doesn't help that the media simplify it to absurdity, which is why people think Serotonin is the neurotransmitter of happiness, when in fact the Serotonin system in the brain comprises of a family of known receptor systems 5HT1 to 5HT7, Serotonin also affects gut mobility, and there's as many Serotonin receptors in the gut aws there are in the brain. Dopamine isn't the neurotransmitter of compulsiveness or addiction, that is just simplifying its purpose to absurdity. I can go on but you get the picture. Humans simply do not have the capability currently to understand this complexity, also researchers have their own agendas and skewed data which further complicates things. It is possible that humans will cease to exist before we understand all there is to know about human biochemistry.People would assume that we know every structure and chemical in the human body, but we don't. In the last 3 - 5 years we've discovered Rosehip neurons in the brain in August 2018 and the Endorestiform nucleus in the brain also in 2018. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosehip_neuron#:~:text=Rosehip%20neurons%20are%20inhibitory%20GABAergic,inhibitory%20neurons%20in%20Layer%201.&text=An%20international%20group%20of%20scientists,their%20discovery%20in%20August%202018.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorestiform_nucleusThe 18 Kilo Dalton Translocator protein (TSPO) which is something I'm particularly interested in, has it's 3D Crystalline structure modelled in 2014, before that we didn't know the structure. Once you add in genetics and the complexity there you'd need way more supercomputing power than currently available and much smarter AI to work through the data. Human Biochemistry is unbelievably complex, and I even understate this immensely. Scientists do have a sense of humour, there's a signalling pathway in the human body called https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedgehog_signaling_pathwayNamed after Sonic the Hedgehog.


Yes it is so complex that we know more about the planets than we do about human bodies.
Edited by: "fiqqer" 2nd Jul
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