Drywall Sander. 720w, dust extraction system, 3 yr warranty.  £49.99 instore Aldi from Sunday 27th Sept
251°Expired

Drywall Sander. 720w, dust extraction system, 3 yr warranty. £49.99 instore Aldi from Sunday 27th Sept

£49.99ALDI Deals
46
Found 21st Sep 2015
Ideal for dry sanding, polishing and finishing off walls, floors and sensitive surfaces.
■720W
■No-load speed 0-2450rpm
■Soft start
■Dust extraction system – no vacuum cleaner required
■Variable speed
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46 Comments
LOL i was just looking for one on Amazon. Thanks!
It looks good but can you get sanding sheets for it, they don't look a standard size
Could you not use a random orbit sander for this sort of thing? You'd get more use out of it
Or get good at doing a proper job,just saying.
Gravitastrophe

Could you not use a random orbit sander for this sort of thing? You'd get … Could you not use a random orbit sander for this sort of thing? You'd get more use out of it



Yes. I did that a few years ago, with a vacuum attachment too.

We're still clearing up the dust.
Banned
Waldolf

Yes. I did that a few years ago, with a vacuum attachment too.We're still … Yes. I did that a few years ago, with a vacuum attachment too.We're still clearing up the dust.


Then check your vaccum..May be its leaking..;)
morrig

Or get good at doing a proper job,just saying.



Correct
good deal
kristoff

Correct



so your going to ames tape some drywall then be able to paint it without sanding?? thats a new one for me how you going to manage that then
I'm in the process of plastering our living room and since I'm still learning I will need to finish it off by sanding it. Would this be the right tool for finishing off a plastered wall?
oggy_c

I'm in the process of plastering our living room and since I'm still … I'm in the process of plastering our living room and since I'm still learning I will need to finish it off by sanding it. Would this be the right tool for finishing off a plastered wall?



If the job has been done properly with square edge board there should be such a thin layer of compound, smoothly applied that sanding should be barely necessary. It should be wet sponged to get it almost perfectly smoothed, then lightly sanded with a hand sander so you can feel things properly. If taper edged board has been used I'd still argue you don't need one of these but they are probably more relevant
Could this be used to remove paint from plastered walls?
smiffy1888

so your going to ames tape some drywall then be able to paint it without … so your going to ames tape some drywall then be able to paint it without sanding?? thats a new one for me how you going to manage that then



think most are thinking this is traditional plastering, this method isn't used very often over here, but in the states they don't plaster over the whole wall, just tape the seams and go over them.
morrig

Or get good at doing a proper job,just saying.



wow you don`t sand your drywall then?

must be that "i don`t give a crap what my walls look like finnish"
iDealYou

Could this be used to remove paint from plastered walls?



this will remove the paint, but why remove the paint?

just key it (light sanding) and paint/paper over it
How about using this to smooth down artex textured walls?
dbrawl2097

How about using this to smooth down artex textured walls?


Be very careful!
Up until the mid 80's, Artex contained Asbestos which is fine whilst on your walls / ceiling but dangerous when sanded & turned back to powder.
dbrawl2097

How about using this to smooth down artex textured walls?



Not sure how well it will sand the artex but you need to be wary of sanding artex as some artex contains asbestos and sanding it will create a lot of dust (dust collector or not). If it was put on in the 90's the chances are it is asbestos free, before then and you need to be careful. You could get it tested for £30-40 I think.
eslick

think most are thinking this is traditional plastering, this method isn't … think most are thinking this is traditional plastering, this method isn't used very often over here, but in the states they don't plaster over the whole wall, just tape the seams and go over them.



Having occasionally worked with my mate who does drywalling I can confirm taping and jointing is used extensively in commercial premises. It's a thankless task rubbing it down, I didn't mind the dust going everywhere but when it get in your eyes it's a blinking flipper, anything that makes the job easier and cleaner has to be worth a go.

Edited by: "Gordinho" 22nd Sep 2015
ws007

this will remove the paint, but why remove the paint? just key it (light … this will remove the paint, but why remove the paint? just key it (light sanding) and paint/paper over it


I want to change the colour on my wall from red to white. I thought you had to remove current colour before painting over walls... Is this wrong? Thanks.
As has been said, this is for dry lining NOT plastering,
With plastering you use a thin coat of finishing plaster over the board and it doesn't need sanding (or at least it shouldn't) but with drywall you just tape and fill the joint (usually taper board) with filling plaster then a light sand.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both systems.

I'm very interested in this and how the system works without a vacuum, at the moment I use a orbital sander and vacuum and have very little dust.
Could I use this to polish the car? I've got a Dacia Sandero if it helps.
Hpi_matrix

Could I use this to polish the car? I've got a Dacia Sandero if it helps.


You could use it - please post an image of the results!
iDealYou

I want to change the colour on my wall from red to white. I thought you … I want to change the colour on my wall from red to white. I thought you had to remove current colour before painting over walls... Is this wrong? Thanks.



There's no need to remove the old colour , it might need an extra coat of paint (or two if you're really unlucky) to hide it but this is much easier than sanding the old colour off.
glennhoward007

You could use it - please post an image of the results!



Our son when he was 10 thought he'd help out and he and a friend washed the car, they found some really mucky bits and borrowed some scouring pads to make it easier !!! Imagine my surprise when I got home
RxTx

There's no need to remove the old colour , it might need an extra coat of … There's no need to remove the old colour , it might need an extra coat of paint (or two if you're really unlucky) to hide it but this is much easier than sanding the old colour off.



what he said, but as i said remember to key it before the first coat.
trogg

As has been said, this is for dry lining NOT plastering, With plastering … As has been said, this is for dry lining NOT plastering, With plastering you use a thin coat of finishing plaster over the board and it doesn't need sanding (or at least it shouldn't) but with drywall you just tape and fill the joint (usually taper board) with filling plaster then a light sand.There are advantages and disadvantages to both systems.I'm very interested in this and how the system works without a vacuum, at the moment I use a orbital sander and vacuum and have very little dust.



​These form their own vacuum and suction and seal themselves to the wall so that no dust gets out from the sides of the pad. This is not the case with any other sander even with vacuum attachment, as some dust always gets blown out of the sides of a normal sander.
I'm just wondering if this is any good for levelling off repaired seams that I've done monkeys **** job of filling.

I sat down to Sunday lunch and just happened to wander back into the kitchen to grab something when water started pouring through the light fitting. My daughters had left the water running and sink blocked on the 3rd floor of the house so now have a few feet of ceiling seams in a number of rooms where the water has found its way down and I have pulled bad plaster out and refilled with filler but now want to get nice and level to the rest of the ceiling. Normally I do it by hand but find I don't get it perfectly level. I assume something like this would make short work and ensure I end up with a nice level finish?
I've had a god awful job done by cowboys getting my living room plastered (all walls & ceiling). Worse the idiots painted over it with good quality trade vinyl matt paint (before fixing any issues) Now i'm thinking I may need to get someone else in to PVA and re-plaster the whole room again!
Seeing this is making me wonder if it would it be wise to use this to sand most of the paint off before re-plastering?
OR forget re-plastering and tackle the whole room myself and use filler where needed and sand the room with this ready for paint? Room approx 4m x 5m. Having an angry month.
Any pro advice appreciated.
Edited by: "Daves_mate" 22nd Sep 2015
RxTx

There's no need to remove the old colour , it might need an extra coat of … There's no need to remove the old colour , it might need an extra coat of paint (or two if you're really unlucky) to hide it but this is much easier than sanding the old colour off.



Use the cheapest white emulsion available (usually unbranded "trade" paint) for the first coat over your existing red walls. Once that's dry cover it with the paint you actually want as the finish on your walls.

Could save you a lot of money - did my walls recently and a pot of trade paint was around £8. The top coat paint was £38 per pot.
We removed wallpaper and the plastering is patchy, I've caulked, but still need to sand bits down. Could I use this or an orbit sander?
Hpi_matrix

Could I use this to polish the car? I've got a Dacia Sandero if it helps.



Take your car to a local Bodyshop they would be able to machine polish that for you don't try it yourself as it'll end in tears. Too many things can go wrong when using a machine to polish cars best left to professionals.
Does anybody know if this would be suitable for sanding down brick? I've recently chisseled off the cement/plaster to expose the brick on my chimney breast but it all looks rather dirty. Was thinking this could do a nice job - but perhaps not suitable on brick?
seems a little expensive for what it is
mantisinc

Does anybody know if this would be suitable for sanding down brick? I've … Does anybody know if this would be suitable for sanding down brick? I've recently chisseled off the cement/plaster to expose the brick on my chimney breast but it all looks rather dirty. Was thinking this could do a nice job - but perhaps not suitable on brick?



​No. Use a stiff deck scrubber brush and normal detergent, or a steam cleaner.
Daves_mate

I've had a god awful job done by cowboys getting my living room plastered … I've had a god awful job done by cowboys getting my living room plastered (all walls & ceiling). Worse the idiots painted over it with good quality trade vinyl matt paint (before fixing any issues) Now i'm thinking I may need to get someone else in to PVA and re-plaster the whole room again! Seeing this is making me wonder if it would it be wise to use this to sand most of the paint off before re-plastering? OR forget re-plastering and tackle the whole room myself and use filler where needed and sand the room with this ready for paint? Room approx 4m x 5m. Having an angry month. :(Any pro advice appreciated.



without seeing it its hard to say for sure but if its indentations (holes) where they didn't have an even coating of plaster then buy a bag of gyproc easi-fill (dulux or crown decorator centres) and mix up small amounts at a time and fill them in, the easi-fill is great for sanding down, slightly dusty and messy but any edges easily sand away and wont be visible after sanding and painting.

i have to do it all the time after plasterers and tapers, even the good ones occasionally miss the odd bit here and there, get a torch and shine it from the side to easily show up any imperfections.

if its lumps and bumps thats the problem then this sander would probably do the job fine though i would personally just use a sanding pole and some 140 grit sandpaper and do a wall at a time, im sure you could fix it ok without getting someone in to replaster it unless its totally horrendous looking
Edited by: "smiffy1888" 23rd Sep 2015
This looks quite a decent bit of kit. When I moved in my house every ceiling in the house had polystyrene ceiling tiles. Has anyone ever set fire to these. They must be one of the most dangerous things ever invented. The heat from them is incredible. Anyway as I decorated each room the tiles came off leaving the ceilings in a right mess with thick bits of glue that I couldn't get off. At the time I couldn't find a plasterer and decided to paper the ceilings. I did a professional job of all of the ceilings and it hid the mess underneath but as time moved on we decided to put the house on the market and the first couple who came in looked at the ceiling in the hall and we saw the look on their faces. They probably thought it was worse to have paper on the ceilings than artex.

Anyway we decided to keep the house and agreed that each room I come to decorate the paper on the ceiling will come off. The first bedroom I did the paper actually brought away all of the glue the ceiling tiles left behind and I just needed to touch up the areas where the paint had come off to get the level right. I set to with the electric sander, sealed the door, opened the windows and then had some fun for the next two hours !! The room ended up looking like thick fog and I daren't leave the room for fear of all the dust going down the stairs. Eventually it settled, gave it a good hoover and painted it. The ceiling isn't perfect but it's not bad and a whole lot better now the paper's off.

The second room was a little different. I had skimmed the whole room. I can plaster walls but never really fancied doing a ceiling. For some reason on one wall the plaster hadn't keyed and when I pulled the paper off I lost quite a bit of plaster here and there. In the end I took the whole layer of plaster off the wall with the use of a steam stripper. It worked a treat. The plaster on the other walls was fine apart from one area about a foot square. Whether there was something wrong with the pva or plaster I don't know. So now I needed to take the paper off the ceiling and this time the paper brought a lot of the paint off on the ceiling. It was like a skin. I never painted this it was like it when I moved in and had ceiling tiles on which had been removed to paper it. I can only think that the wallpaper paste had reacted with the paint.. I had to scrape the paint off with a window scraper. It took me 6 hours and the bare plaster beneath was in pretty good condition.

Waffled on a bit now but I again sanded the walls in this room with the sander. Sealed the door, opened the windows, waited for the dust to settle and then went downstairs. Wife then came home and the opening of the front door must have acted like a vacuum. All the dust from the bedroom rushed down the stairs like an unfriendly ghost. Everything was covered in the hall. It took me two hours to hoover and clean everything down so I am now banded from any sort of electric sanding in the house. Unless of course I buy one of these for the next room.

I still think it will create a lot of dust. All electric motors express air so I can't see it being 100% dust free unless anyone has tried one. By the way don't ever ever use a Ryobi for sanding walls that are plastered or have been dry lined using gyproc filler. The dust gets in the motor and breaks it. My brand new one lasted just under two hours in the first room. Took it back and swapped it for a hitachi which seems to be more up to the job. I guess Ryobi are only meant for wood.

ws007

wow you don`t sand your drywall then? must be that "i don`t give a crap … wow you don`t sand your drywall then? must be that "i don`t give a crap what my walls look like finnish"



​wet sponge it down after 4-6 hours.
dbrawl2097

How about using this to smooth down artex textured walls?



​dusty disaster especially if is old asbestos containing stuff. wet down or use a steam stripper to soften, then use a sharp edged industrial scraper. there is a product you can buy which is a bit like modern paint stripper. You could also get a plasterer to skim over it
iDealYou

I want to change the colour on my wall from red to white. I thought you … I want to change the colour on my wall from red to white. I thought you had to remove current colour before painting over walls... Is this wrong? Thanks.



​a coat of cream to obliterate the red. Then use dulux trade vinyl matt white as this is the best covering vinyl matt and worth the extra for the coats it will save you.
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