Eco chicken coop for 4 chickens, £199.99 delivered @ solway recycling
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Eco chicken coop for 4 chickens, £199.99 delivered @ solway recycling

28
Found 18th Dec 2017Edited by:"SOUTHWALES"
Great price for a plastic hen house. Purchased one last week and it arrived within 3 working days. Great customer service as they ring you about your order and to confirm delivery which is by pallet as they are pre built. All you need to do is attach nest box. More than happy with mine as so much easier to clean and no worry about getting red mite like with wooden coops.


Solway Recycling, Rigghead, Shawhead, Dumfries, DG2 9SH.


The Eco Hen Loft is a variation on the poplular Solway Mini Hen Coop. The Eco Hen Loft is made from 100% recycled plastic so will not rot and will prevent the build up of red mites. While we cannot guarantee red mite will not find a home on your hen house the plastic does not allow red mites to penetrate unlike wood. A great starter coop ideal for housing up to 4 birds.

The removable roof combined with the easy clean plastic makes the eco hen loft childsplay to maintain.

The eco hen loft is up off the ground on legs. These legs are adjustable to suit your desired height. The height of the legs can make the base of your loft anything between 0 - 150mm from the ground.

The external nest boxes make retrieving eggs easy with no need for back breaking crawling into houses. Simply unclip the plastic curl pin, slide back the nest box roof and you have access to the eggs.

The door has an open/ closing mechanism that is hidden when the door is open and the ramp down. This is all attached to the eco hen loft making for easy moving. The locking mechanism simply twists horizontal to lock the door shut. Swivelling the lock vertically means it is hidden underneath the door when it is down.

Your coop will be fully built on site and will require no further assembly when you get it delivered simply clip the nesting boxes into place and it's ready for your chickens.

The eco hen loft is available in green, red, black or grey. It has two perches with more than enough space for your birds to sit on.

The eco hen loft does not need treating so it is as low maintenance as possible.

The eco hen loft has 447 x 834mm or 0.37 square metres of internal floor space which is ideal for housing for up to 4 birds. The eco loft can be between 800mm and 1000mm in height depending on the height of the adjustable legs. The actual size of the Eco Hen Loft is 1220mm wide (with 2 nest boxes attached) x 1020mm length and weighs approx 25kgs.

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Moitie_Moitie10 m ago

What a great idea.


It certainly is, these coops are so easy to clean compared to my previous wooden coops, they will also last a lifetime so are a good investment. Chickens are great to have around, they make great pets with the benefit of fresh healthy eggs and they cost very little to keep, You can get a bail of straw for around £6 and a 25kg bag of chicken pellets for less than £7 which will last for several weeks. Free range the chickens and they will get 50% of there diet from foraging in your garden. I keep Rhode island reds and they make a great all round bird, easy to tame and lay an egg daily.
Chickens are easy to keep, highly entertaining and lay delicious eggs every day. What more could you ask for in a pet? Hens can be wonderfully rewarding to keep and you will soon learn that each hen has her own brilliant personality that will keep you endlessly amused. Whether you have already introduced some happy hens to your garden or you're trying to decide if keeping chickens is for you, you're in the right place.


For those who have been keeping chickens for a long time, it’s hard to express all of the joy and wonder chickens bring to their lives. With this in mind, some of the key pleasures of keeping chickens includes delicious eggs, creating a more sustainable environment, as well as being a source peace and serenity in your life.

Eggs

Some people may not know that free-range chicken eggs are not only tastier, but they are actually better for you when compared to store-bought varieties. Keeping chickens is the perfect way to have a fresh supply of delicious and nutritious eggs at your fingertips – whether you prefer your eggs to be poached, fried or scrambled, you’ll never be short of these protein packed ingredients if you decide that keeping chickens is right for you.

Sustainability

Keeping chickens is one of the easiest ways to live more sustainably – they help eliminate scraps, produce an all natural fertiliser, assist with composting, and not to mention- all those eggs! Keeping chickens is one the easiest and most rewarding ways to start living green.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
28 Comments
What a great idea.
Wont this get really hot in the summer??
Moitie_Moitie10 m ago

What a great idea.


It certainly is, these coops are so easy to clean compared to my previous wooden coops, they will also last a lifetime so are a good investment. Chickens are great to have around, they make great pets with the benefit of fresh healthy eggs and they cost very little to keep, You can get a bail of straw for around £6 and a 25kg bag of chicken pellets for less than £7 which will last for several weeks. Free range the chickens and they will get 50% of there diet from foraging in your garden. I keep Rhode island reds and they make a great all round bird, easy to tame and lay an egg daily.
Let the kids use it over the festive period.
bilbob8 m ago

Wont this get really hot in the summer??


They are quite well ventilated which is important to chickens so it has never been a problem.
Chickens are easy to keep, highly entertaining and lay delicious eggs every day. What more could you ask for in a pet? Hens can be wonderfully rewarding to keep and you will soon learn that each hen has her own brilliant personality that will keep you endlessly amused. Whether you have already introduced some happy hens to your garden or you're trying to decide if keeping chickens is for you, you're in the right place.


For those who have been keeping chickens for a long time, it’s hard to express all of the joy and wonder chickens bring to their lives. With this in mind, some of the key pleasures of keeping chickens includes delicious eggs, creating a more sustainable environment, as well as being a source peace and serenity in your life.

Eggs

Some people may not know that free-range chicken eggs are not only tastier, but they are actually better for you when compared to store-bought varieties. Keeping chickens is the perfect way to have a fresh supply of delicious and nutritious eggs at your fingertips – whether you prefer your eggs to be poached, fried or scrambled, you’ll never be short of these protein packed ingredients if you decide that keeping chickens is right for you.

Sustainability

Keeping chickens is one of the easiest ways to live more sustainably – they help eliminate scraps, produce an all natural fertiliser, assist with composting, and not to mention- all those eggs! Keeping chickens is one the easiest and most rewarding ways to start living green.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
Great idea just wish I had a bigger garden
Just out of interest, were you allowed to keep the pallet it was delivered on?
SOUTHWALES15 m ago

Chickens are easy to keep, highly entertaining and lay delicious eggs …Chickens are easy to keep, highly entertaining and lay delicious eggs every day. What more could you ask for in a pet? Hens can be wonderfully rewarding to keep and you will soon learn that each hen has her own brilliant personality that will keep you endlessly amused. Whether you have already introduced some happy hens to your garden or you're trying to decide if keeping chickens is for you, you're in the right place.For those who have been keeping chickens for a long time, it’s hard to express all of the joy and wonder chickens bring to their lives. With this in mind, some of the key pleasures of keeping chickens includes delicious eggs, creating a more sustainable environment, as well as being a source peace and serenity in your life.EggsSome people may not know that free-range chicken eggs are not only tastier, but they are actually better for you when compared to store-bought varieties. Keeping chickens is the perfect way to have a fresh supply of delicious and nutritious eggs at your fingertips – whether you prefer your eggs to be poached, fried or scrambled, you’ll never be short of these protein packed ingredients if you decide that keeping chickens is right for you.SustainabilityKeeping chickens is one of the easiest ways to live more sustainably – they help eliminate scraps, produce an all natural fertiliser, assist with composting, and not to mention- all those eggs! Keeping chickens is one the easiest and most rewarding ways to start living green.


How many eggs do you get per chicken?
Ungreat2 m ago

How many eggs do you get per chicken?


We have rescue hens, we would get an egg / day / chicken over summer.
Are these fox proof? I didn't read the whole add
Is it easy to be blown away in the wind or do you need to tie it down somehow.
bethesdamse44 m ago

Just out of interest, were you allowed to keep the pallet it was delivered …Just out of interest, were you allowed to keep the pallet it was delivered on?


Yes, coop was strapped to it, driver just off loaded it and left.
jazzy20113 h, 41 m ago

Is it easy to be blown away in the wind or do you need to tie it down …Is it easy to be blown away in the wind or do you need to tie it down somehow.


I get really strong winds and it's never been a problem, my sheds have been blown over and destroyed, but not the chicken coop.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
t00223612 m ago

Are these fox proof? I didn't read the whole add


Yes, far easier for a fox to brake into a wooden coop.
Ungreat50 m ago

How many eggs do you get per chicken?


1 egg every 24 hours, reduced laying in deep winter, although mine hardly go out of lay which I mainly put down to there diet, mine also get all the household scraps, food in one end egg out the other.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
SOUTHWALES4 m ago

Yes, far easier for a fox to brake into a wooden coop.


That's good to know. We have foxes visit our allotment site.
haywoodclan156 m ago

Great idea just wish I had a bigger garden


3 hens would be perfectly fine in a small garden. It would be a lot more room than caged hens get.
Private, council and housing association landlords must let tenants keep chickens and rabbits property118.com/lan…88/

Landlords with a no pets policy for rental properties need to watch out for a little known legal loophole which lets tenants keep chickens and rabbits.

Garden and allotment act 1950.

Abolition of contractual restrictions on keeping hens and rabbits.E+W.(1)Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in any lease or tenancy or in any covenant, contract or undertaking relating to the use to be made of any land, it shall be lawful for the occupier of any land to keep, otherwise than by way of trade or business, hens or rabbits in any place on the land and to erect or place and maintain such buildings or structures on the land as reasonably necessary for that purpose: .
Provided that nothing in this subsection shall authorise any hens or rabbits to be kept in such a place or in such a manner as to be prejudicial to health or a nuisance or affect the operation of any enactment.

It relates to any land not just allotments.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
SOUTHWALES1 h, 19 m ago

I get really strong winds and it's never been a problem, has sheds blown …I get really strong winds and it's never been a problem, has sheds blown over and destroyed, but not the coop.


Have you been to see your Doctor?
I have a separate bit of garden that is around 8ft wide and 50ft long that is unused. It has 7ft conifers to one side and a 6ft brick wall to the other. If I purchase this and just closed off at the open end of wall and conifers - would I need to do anything else to keep them contained and safe? The conifers already have chicken wire at the bottom. I’m happy to let them roam around this part of the garden as it’s very much unused.

how would I be best enclosing the area? I would need to put a barrier of sorts between the wall and trees.
Thanks
Cristiano53 m ago

I have a separate bit of garden that is around 8ft wide and 50ft long that …I have a separate bit of garden that is around 8ft wide and 50ft long that is unused. It has 7ft conifers to one side and a 6ft brick wall to the other. If I purchase this and just closed off at the open end of wall and conifers - would I need to do anything else to keep them contained and safe? The conifers already have chicken wire at the bottom. I’m happy to let them roam around this part of the garden as it’s very much unused.how would I be best enclosing the area? I would need to put a barrier of sorts between the wall and trees. Thanks


Chickens like to forage around conifer trees and bushes if you can try make them part of there run, chicken wire would be best to try and keep foxes out.
SOUTHWALES23 m ago

Chickens like to forage around conifer trees and bushes if you can try …Chickens like to forage around conifer trees and bushes if you can try make them part of there run, chicken wire would be best to try and keep foxes out.


also handy to empty basket after mowing lawns - they love it
we built our coop out of recycled wood - super strong and totally fox proof
SOUTHWALES6 h, 31 m ago

Chickens like to forage around conifer trees and bushes if you can try …Chickens like to forage around conifer trees and bushes if you can try make them part of there run, chicken wire would be best to try and keep foxes out.


Thanks. Will it be ok to have one side without chicken wire as this will be a solid brick wall. But there would be no roof? Does this matter? Or should there be a roof/chicken wire over the top as well? At the open end I was just going to put chicken wire and perhaps a gate of sorts for me to be able to get in and clear up.

This coop looks great. Just need to convince the wife.


We have a 2 year old daughter and I think this would be a great little pet/hobby. Gonna look into the different breeds now so we can choose the more children’s friendly hens.
Cristiano2 h, 56 m ago

Thanks. Will it be ok to have one side without chicken wire as this will …Thanks. Will it be ok to have one side without chicken wire as this will be a solid brick wall. But there would be no roof? Does this matter? Or should there be a roof/chicken wire over the top as well? At the open end I was just going to put chicken wire and perhaps a gate of sorts for me to be able to get in and clear up. This coop looks great. Just need to convince the wife. We have a 2 year old daughter and I think this would be a great little pet/hobby. Gonna look into the different breeds now so we can choose the more children’s friendly hens.


Hi, the brick wall side will be fine, I have this bird netting on the top of my run ebay.co.uk/itm…WLq Not very strong but I hope it puts foxes off thinking they could just hop in over the top, to me it is better than nothing as putting chicken wire on top is not practical. I live rural so have to think about predators more, although not had any problems to date.

When you first get the chickens you will have to show them where they sleep by catching them and putting them in the coop before it gets dark, by the third night they will have the idea and put themselves to bed before sun down, they don't like to be out after dark.

Rhode island reds are a great bird and very hardy, laying well over 250 eggs per year, another good egg layer and full of character are the bluebells. Best place to get your hens are poultry auctions, there normally auctioned at point of lay around 6 months old in batches of 3, I paid £18 for my 3 Rhode island reds and £39 for the 3 bluebells but I had to have them as they were just what I was looking for. I would have more chickens but I already get to many eggs at 6 a day, mine just don't stop paying even in deep winter. I will add some pics for my chickens when I get chance.

Another reason why you want a plastic coop is red mite, there are a tiny mite that can live in cracks in wooden coops and come out to feed on the birds of a night, it is spread by wild birds, but it is highly unlikely you will get them with a plastic coop and if you do they are easy to get rid off with desi dust or just give the coop a jet wash, not so easy with wooden coop as there is to many cracks for them to hide in. pestfix.co.uk/org…asp

They go mad for scraps, mine get any left over food such as chips, pizza crusts, any left over Sunday roast and they love things like cooked pasta and porridge oats. Feed them your scraps and they will be your best friend.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 18th Dec 2017
SOUTHWALES15 h, 11 m ago

Hi, the brick wall side will be fine, I have this bird netting on the top …Hi, the brick wall side will be fine, I have this bird netting on the top of my run https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4m-10m-Anti-Bird-Crop-Fruit-Veg-Garden-Netting-Protect-Plants-Pond-Trees-Mesh/291755719746?epid=582428327&hash=item43edfefc42:g:Sq4AAOSwhRxXKWLq Not very strong but I hope it puts foxes off thinking they could just hop in over the top, to me it is better than nothing as putting chicken wire on top is not practical. I live rural so have to think about predators more, although not had any problems to date. When you first get the chickens you will have to show them where they sleep by catching them and putting them in the coop before it gets dark, by the third night they will have the idea and put themselves to bed before sun down, they don't like to be out after dark.Rhode island reds are a great bird and very hardy, laying well over 250 eggs per year, another good egg layer and full of character are the bluebells. Best place to get your hens are poultry auctions, there normally auctioned at point of lay around 6 months old in batches of 3, I paid £18 for my 3 Rhode island reds and £39 for the 3 bluebells but I had to have them as they were just what I was looking for. I would have more chickens but I already get to many eggs at 6 a day, mine just don't stop paying even in deep winter. I will add some pics for my chickens when I get chance.Another reason why you want a plastic coop is red mite, there are a tiny mite that can live in cracks in wooden coops and come out to feed on the birds of a night, it is spread by wild birds, but it is highly unlikely you will get them with a plastic coop and if you do they are easy to get rid off with desi dust or just give the coop a jet wash, not so easy with wooden coop as there is to many cracks for them to hide in. http://www.pestfix.co.uk/organ-x-desi-dust-(diatomaceous-earth)-insect-killing-powder.aspThey go mad for scraps, mine get any left over food such as chips, pizza crusts, any left over Sunday roast and they love things like cooked pasta and porridge oats. Feed them your scraps and they will be your best friend.




Thnaks for your help. Those breed of hens sound ideal.Having had a look around some of the intro to keeping hens pages it seems I need to be prepared for a morning visit to check on them, give them water and food. Similar thing in the evening including locking them up in the coop. Once a week clearing out the coop and raking the lawn plus putting new shavings in.

Is this an approximate assessment about the time commitment for keeping hens?

Im just wondering if I’m better getting one of these coops that have a ready made run attached, which is much more contained.
Are the hens easy to usher into places?
Cristiano3 h, 14 m ago

Thnaks for your help. Those breed of hens sound ideal.Having had a look …Thnaks for your help. Those breed of hens sound ideal.Having had a look around some of the intro to keeping hens pages it seems I need to be prepared for a morning visit to check on them, give them water and food. Similar thing in the evening including locking them up in the coop. Once a week clearing out the coop and raking the lawn plus putting new shavings in. Is this an approximate assessment about the time commitment for keeping hens? Im just wondering if I’m better getting one of these coops that have a ready made run attached, which is much more contained. Are the hens easy to usher into places?



Hi, your morning visit is to open the coop door and put there food and water out, they want out as soon as it starts to get light. Takes 2 minutes then you can get back to bed if need be, this time of year you are letting them out just before 8am and locking them in there coop around 4.30pm, but in the height of the summer it can be as early as 6am and locking them away after 10.30pm.

The more free range they have the less maintanence they require as they will forage most of there diet from bugs, worms and vegatation around the garden or large run. They will also make there own dust bath under a tree for a ample and will groom themselves which again is quite entertaining to watch.

As for the coop maintanence it is quite minimal, here is what I do, to start with I got some pond liner ( cheap enough of ebay ) and cut it the the foot print of the coop and nest boxes and placed them inside the coop, this is to make it easier to clean the coop later on., then on top of that I put in about 2 inches of straw on the floor of the coop and abut 3 - 4 inches in the nest boxes to protect the eggs as when they lay they sort of pop out and if they hit the floor they will break. Assuming you go for the solway coop then it is just a case of every other day remove the lid from the coop and nest boxes, put a nappy sack over your hand groceries.asda.com/pro…432 and do what is called poo picking, the poo will clump to the straw so you just pick the poo/ straw clumps out and bin them, then replace some of the straw that you picked out with the poo so there is still roughly 2 inches, you are looking at about a hand full if straw will need replacing, also top up the nest boxes with straw if need be. Once every few weks do a full coop clean out, remove all old straw and bin or compost, remove the pond liner and hose down, once dry replace pond liner and put in fresh straw. Do your poo picking and full clean out in the afternoon if possible so you are not disturbing there egg laying. I probably make it sound like a lot of work but it is not, just 5 mins every other day to poo pick and 20 mins once every few weeks for there full clean out. Another plus of this plastic coop is that if need be once every 6 months or yearly you can give it a jet wash to bring it back up like new.

As for wood shavings or bark there not needed, assuming you are o ly getting around 3 - 6 chickens you do not need to rake the lawn as there poops will be spread out. If you think you will want closer 6 hens then go for the maxi coop, solwayrecycling.co.uk/sho…oft as this is the one I have and is easily roomy enough for 6 rhode hens as it will allow for 3 birds per perch and it comes as standard with 2 nest boxes. You want 1 nest box the every 3 birds. I know £240 with vat for a coop sounds expensive but it will last forever and a day and will have resale value, the wooden flat packed coops are made out of softwood and last 3 years tops if your lucky and are a pain to clean out.

I would not recommend the coops with runs, they look bigger online than they actually are in person once erected, just look at some of the measurement's, you get very little for your money, the birds will be unhappy, maintainece will be more as they are pooping in a small run area and will need cleaning daily. They will have less room to forage for there own food and will boredom feed on there own feed pellets, pellets are cheap but why not let the find 50% of there own diet, it is what they love to do.

There easy to get them where you want, I have a large run but also of a day when I am about I let them free range in the garden, if I suddenly need to go out and want them back in there run, I just throw some scraps or porridge oats in the run, they run straight in for it. They are food motivated.

Just another point on your hens, go for ones that are less likely to go broody such as Rhodes island reds, black rocks, Warren or bluebells. Hens that go broody can be a pain, they want to sit on the eggs and are not happy when you try to take what they now see as there eggs.

Hope this helps, anything else you would like to know or if I have not explained anything properly then please just ask.
Edited by: "SOUTHWALES" 19th Dec 2017
I kept 3 hens on the allotment, then I moved allotment and kept them in the back garden for about 3 months. I and the kids loved keeping them but they are poop machines. Whilst I enjoyed keeping them on the plot if keeping them at home give some thought to where you will allow them to roam, my run was too big to put in the back garden so they were free to roam anywhere...big mistake!

Can't beat getting up and collecting your 'farm fresh' eggs every morning, I'd like to get some more for the new plot, sadly of the three I had at home, one died (and was almost pecked apart by the others!) and an urban fox got the other two.

Apart from the amount of poop they produce, they are great fun!
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