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Edwin Jagger Ivory Coloured Plastic Handle Pure Badger Hair Shaving Brush - £10.99 Delivered @ Amazon
Edwin Jagger Ivory Coloured Plastic Handle Pure Badger Hair Shaving Brush - £10.99 Delivered @ Amazon

Edwin Jagger Ivory Coloured Plastic Handle Pure Badger Hair Shaving Brush - £10.99 Delivered @ Amazon

Buy forBuy forBuy for£10.99
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Nice brush, I had this sitting in basket for a week and was just about to purchase when I was told the price on this had dropped.. think it went from 11.99 to 10.99 - regardless, this is the cheapest I can find this online and would be great addition to some of the recent DE safety razor deals.


Product Description
This ivory-coloured, pure badger hair-filled shaving brush with moulded plastic handle and Edwin Jagger logo is an entry level shaving brush and excellent value for money. For a new or experienced shaver wishing to try a shaving brush for the first time this will be the answer. Pure badger hair has the ability to absorb hot water during the shave so it will ensure an effective lathering performance for your daily shave with either Edwin Jagger natural, paraben-free shaving cream or shaving soap. This Edwin Jagger shaving brush comes packaged in an acetate box with wet shaving and care instructions to ensure longevity.
Box Contains
1 x Shaving brush
1 x Care instructions

26 Comments

Do badgers shave?

Dear me, I thought I had seen it all but now find people actually go and kill badgers just to turn their hair into shaving brushes.

Absolutely ridiculous. There is no need for this.


Edited by: "jmarcelino" 5th May 2011

One word - YuK

Badger hair has been used for shaving brushes for hundreds of years. Boar bristle and horse hair have also been used but badger is generally regarded as the best.

Btw badger hair these days is sourced almost exclusively from China, where the badger is considered more of a pest than a character from 'Wind in the Willows'.

Original Poster

a6unx

One word - YuK



You can all be relieved that it's imitation ivory then As Kafkaesque stated these badgers are pests in China and are hunted as such. Tbh the deal isn't particularly about the badger aspect, since - barring the cheap synthetic brushes - almost all shaving brushes will be either badger or boar, it's just a good price for a good brush..

From the ever useful wikipedia :

Today badgers are commercially raised for their hair, which is harvested … Today badgers are commercially raised for their hair, which is harvested to make shaving brushes. Virtually all commercial badger hair comes from mainland China, which supplies knots of hair in three grades to brush makers in both China and Europe. In rural Northern China, badgers multiply to the point of becoming a crop nuisance, and village cooperatives are licensed by the national government to hunt badgers and process their hair. The hair is also used for paint brushes, and was used as a trim on Native American garments. It has been used in some instances as doll hair.

this post has become a source of info for me more than a hot deal.

Who cares where the badgers come from: they're being killed in the wild, on purpose, just to get their hair and make these stupid brushes. That's just wrong in so many levels.

Monkeys were also considered pests in China and eaten or turned into goods until they ran them into the brink of extinction. Why do you think badgers are now a protected species in the UK?

While this may have been a great tool hundreds of years ago as you say, I think shaving technology has evolved a bit since then and there's really no need for people to be rubbing dead animals' hair in your face to foam it up.
Edited by: "jmarcelino" 5th May 2011

jmarcelino

Who cares where the badgers come from: they're being killed in the wild, … Who cares where the badgers come from: they're being killed in the wild, on purpose, just to get their hair and make these stupid brushes. That's just wrong in so many levels.



I see nothing wrong with managing a pest for whatever reason, even better if you can make some use of them. We have too many badgers in Britain too, but the law protects them even when they spread disease to useful livestock. All down to bleeding heart city dwellers.

Incidentally, that law makes it an offence to be in possession of "any part of a badger", and people have been prosecuted for having a few badger hairs stuck in the mud on a vehicle tyre when police suspected (but couldn't prove) they had been badger baiting. So these shaving brushes may come with a certificate of foreign origin, which you will want to file safely. At least, I know that similar articles used to come with certificates, but maybe the law has been toned down more recently.

That's a completely different issue LongPockets, culling badgers in areas where livestock is kept and has where tuberculosis has been seen should be acceptable, and actually Defra is running several studies on how to do effectively.

But I really doubt those are the badgers being used for these brushes. Until the Chinese can prove the contrary - apparently they have been called repeatedly to do so, but never revealed anything about the true origin of the animals used in these brushes - I will assume otherwise.

In the meantime, while the doubt lingers it's just easier to not use them.


Edited by: "jmarcelino" 5th May 2011

jmarcelino

while the doubt lingers it's just easier to not use them.



No one is forcing you. I prefer freedom to coercion for everyone, not just the bunny-huggers (who favour draconian penalties for others).

The Russians are making use of mastodon ivory, found with frozen corpses of these beasts in the wastes of Siberia. They reason that mastodons are not a threatened species, so why not use the valuable ivory? Apparently there is quite a lot available. Of course the animal rights people are appalled, but you have to wonder why.

Original Poster

LongPockets

Incidentally, that law makes it an offence to be in possession of "any … Incidentally, that law makes it an offence to be in possession of "any part of a badger", and people have been prosecuted for having a few badger hairs stuck in the mud on a vehicle tyre when police suspected (but couldn't prove) they had been badger baiting. So these shaving brushes may come with a certificate of foreign origin



That's very interesting; my brush hasn't arrived yet but I'll certainly have a look for certificate of origin when it arrives - and be extra wary of stray badger hairs getting on my clothing should PC Plod approach me for a chat. *mental note to self - no knives, no badger hairs!

In a way, I'm bitterly disappointed that these brushes aren't made from beaver hair, cos this thread could have been a riot!

"I prefer freedom to coercion for everyone"

Unfortunately your freedom is a bit selfish as if people were free to kill whatever they want nothing would last much in this commercially obsessed world, also that freedom doesn't extend to the badgers themselves.

I don't understand why you bring up a discussion on ivory, but I can see a flaw in your theory already. It's probably very hard to tell ivory from those frozen mastodons or elephants apart, so elephant hunters will use it as an excuse and claim everything is mastodon ivory, they'll just need to darken it a bit more.

And again why do people need ivory this day and age? It doesn't make any sense.
Killing animals for food, disease prevention or even warmth I can understand. I even understand the need to use animals for experiments which can improve out understanding of medicine, but in this case all these examples are for purely vanity purposes and there are perfectly acceptable replacement already.

My rule is always considering there was a higher species than us. Would I understand if they killed us just to turn our hair into brushes or our bones into handles? There's no logic in that whatsoever, so I can't agree with the idea of doing the same to lower ranked ones.

Edited by: "jmarcelino" 5th May 2011

Good price voted hot!
Just ignore the nutters, anyone know any good deals on whale burgers?

In a way, I'm bitterly disappointed that these brushes aren't made from … In a way, I'm bitterly disappointed that these brushes aren't made from beaver hair, cos this thread could have been a riot!


:D:D:D

[quote=jmarcelino

that freedom doesn't extend to the badgers themselves.

[/quote]

There is your difficulty with the world as it is. Badgers are not people. People have responsibilities towards animals, but animals do not have rights. Just as well, it is hard enough dealing with people who basically want you dead (usually from other cultures) without having to worry about the welfare of rats, tapeworms and so on, let alone the animals we eat and clothe ourselves with. People who have no loyalty to their own species are engaging in a form of treason.

Incidentally...

I bought one of these a week ago and it is great, the bristles are quite soft and yet firm enough to give a good massage and lather, they are far superior to other natural and synthetic bristles.

designaw

Incidentally...I bought one of these a week ago and it is great, the … Incidentally...I bought one of these a week ago and it is great, the bristles are quite soft and yet firm enough to give a good massage and lather, they are far superior to other natural and synthetic bristles.



At last, someting about the product and not the ethics behind it. Thanks for the info.

LongPockets

There is your difficulty with the world as it is. Badgers are not … There is your difficulty with the world as it is. Badgers are not people. People have responsibilities towards animals, but animals do not have rights. Just as well, it is hard enough dealing with people who basically want you dead (usually from other cultures)



My difficulty with the world? Haha, I don't have any difficulty with the world. You're the one with the difficulty to understand it, as you seem so be so careless about it.

So it's perfectly fine to slaughter animals for purely vanity purposes because you think some other cultures are out to kill you? Don't you see how silly that sounds? You really can't make this stuff up.

As I said I have no problem with eating, and can see uses for them as clothing (eg you're in the siberia and need furs to keep warm). It's the killing for no real useful purpose that I' sorry but I cannot agree with.

"the bristles are quite soft and yet firm enough to give a good massage and lather, they are far superior to other natural and synthetic bristles."

WTH? Are you all so gentle and sensitive skinned men that you can't handle synthetic bristles? Maybe you'd like a nice rub with a bullls ballsack (heard they are quite soft) after that shave followed by an exfoliation with a sponge made of sewn up cats tongues.

There really is no limit to man's vanity and corresponding lack of even basic respect for nature. Unfortunately everything is connected in this world
so this will eventually come back to bite all of our asses.

Btw just to make sure, I'm not a city dweller, I live in the country and have my own allotment. I also live near one of the farms which were affected by the foot & mouth disease, which also started when stupid people started feeding pigs garbage. Then the solution to this was to kill lots of cattle, most of which was perfectly fine, again because some other dimwit miscalculated the epidemic rate. So the lesson I got from it was if we respected nature a bit more maybe we would make things easier on ourselves.


Edited by: "jmarcelino" 5th May 2011

Without wanting to spark a veg vs meat debate, let me just make clear that badger meat is eaten in China, so the hair can be harvested as a by-product, much like leather. They are not just killed for vanity purposes.

Incidentally I own the model up of this very brush, it's excellent. Great size, soft on the face, and swells brilliantly when loaded with water & cream.

kahool

Without wanting to spark a veg vs meat debate, let me just make clear … Without wanting to spark a veg vs meat debate, let me just make clear that badger meat is eaten in China, so the hair can be harvested as a by-product, much like leather. They are not just killed for vanity purposes.Incidentally I own the model up of this very brush, it's excellent. Great size, soft on the face, and swells brilliantly when loaded with water & cream.



Show off

Apart from the debate I am looking for a kabuki style make up brush. Does anyone know if this would be a good alternative?

Original Poster

battelaxe

Apart from the debate I am looking for a kabuki style make up brush. Does … Apart from the debate I am looking for a kabuki style make up brush. Does anyone know if this would be a good alternative?



Hmm not really - at least I don't think so, funnily enough I nicked my sister's to use as a pastry brush! - here's one for £5.49 in Boots though boots.com/en/…07/ Made from the finest Kitten fur. (_;)
Edited by: "snowball" 5th May 2011

snowball

Hmm not really - at least I don't think so, funnily enough I nicked my … Hmm not really - at least I don't think so, funnily enough I nicked my sister's to use as a pastry brush! - here's one for £5.49 in Boots though http://www.boots.com/en/Prestige-Kabuki-Brush_955407/ Made from the finest Kitten fur. (_;)


Hang on, do you mean you nicked your sisters badger shaving brush? Have you checked your sister to make sure she's not a bruvva from anuvva muvva? Or, did you nick your sisters pastry brush to shave your badger with. Or did you brush your badger with a kabuki? I hope the kittens are organically raised and fed on lenor to keep their fur particularly fluffy and silky. I will be checking...

Seriously though thanks for the link, I didnt know that the pressure cooker and saucepan company had an interest in bristles.

Original Poster

battelaxe

*all of that



LOL @ *all of that X)

This thread must be taken over by badger fur mongers or really naive people who believe all the marketing lines they're fed.

Sure the Chinese may eat badger, but I really doubt they eat many of the ones they take fur from. You see when badgers become adults their fur thickens up and becomes stiff and not fluffy at all. Quality fluffy and soft bristles are taken from young badgers which then have relatively little meat to eat.

The Chinese also eat dogs and cats btw, apparently in greater numbers than badgers, so should we look forward to nice and soft dog and cat fur blankets for the coming winter? Those are even better since they can be bred, while badgers have to be mostly caught in the wild. Maybe some of the commenters would like to invest in that business.

Original Poster

jmarcelino

*all of that



SMH @ *all of that
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