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Eurohike 3 man tent at Millets for £63.75 using code
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Eurohike 3 man tent at Millets for £63.75 using code

£63.75 Free P&P FreeMillets Deals
9
Posted 17th May
Looking for a tent for me and my boy for first camping trips and came across this. Seems like good saving and decent enough for the price to get us started 😁
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Some advice about tents:
1. From years of experience, if a tent is described as "3 man" then it will fit 2 people & their kit, or 3 people & no kit. So always go for the next size up to what you think you need (so if there are 3 of you then buy a 4 man tent).
2. Always always ALWAYS practice putting up the tent before going camping. The campsite is not the place to find out that you're missing a vital piece of the tent, or the instructions don't make much sense, or you're struggling in the rain or the dark to work out what goes where.
3. Pay attention to the hydrostatic head rating (hh rating). Basically, this tells you how waterproof your tent is, and is a good guide as to how well your tent will perform in the rain. The higher the rating the better the protection. A rating of 1000 will protect against a light shower with no wind. A rating of 3000 or above is what you should be looking for for camping in this country. And the tent's groundsheet should be at least 3000 (& ideally be 5000) because of the pressure of people pushing down on it.
4. What are you going to do if it rains while you're camping? Are you planning on hiding in the tent, or heading somewhere that's warm & dry (e.g. a pub)? If you're going to hunker down in the tent then take into account how much room you will have inside the tent. If you want to be able to move about then you'll need a bigger tent than if you're happy lying next to each other.
5. You might want to consider a footprint. This is basically a tarpaulin that fits under the tent. It stops the underneath of the tent from getting dirty (it's easier to clean a tarp than a tent), and it offers additional waterproofing protection for the tent's groundsheet. You don't need to buy a special footprint for your tent, cheap tarp will work just as well but make sure that the tarp is tucked under the outer edges of the tent (otherwise when it rains it will just act as an under-tent water collector).
6. If you've not been camping before then try one night in your back garden or in a nearby campsite. You will get an idea of whether or not camping is for you before you've bought too much gear. You'll also find out whether the tent you've bought is suited to what you want/expect from a tent.
9 Comments
This is a great tent. I bought one a couple of months ago from a deal in here. Plenty of room for two, three at a squeeze!
darrenswift17/05/2020 07:49

This is a great tent. I bought one a couple of months ago from a deal in …This is a great tent. I bought one a couple of months ago from a deal in here. Plenty of room for two, three at a squeeze!


How long does this take to put up?

Looking to to do our first camping trip sometime this year but we dont have a clue about tents
Coolio198817/05/2020 08:22

How long does this take to put up? Looking to to do our first camping trip …How long does this take to put up? Looking to to do our first camping trip sometime this year but we dont have a clue about tents



It looks similar to our tent in that I'd say you thread the 2 poles through, get it upright and the lines pegged so it stays up, then it's just a case of securing the rest of it get all the pegs in, the inner bedroom section will attach to the roof/the poles and also need to be pegged out.

We practiced in the garden first, I'm hopeless at instructions but it was fine took about half an hour first go.

I'd recommend getting a cheapo rubber mallet and one of those hook shaped tent peg puller things also just makes things easier.
Anyone know if this is suitable for 3 women?
Some advice about tents:
1. From years of experience, if a tent is described as "3 man" then it will fit 2 people & their kit, or 3 people & no kit. So always go for the next size up to what you think you need (so if there are 3 of you then buy a 4 man tent).
2. Always always ALWAYS practice putting up the tent before going camping. The campsite is not the place to find out that you're missing a vital piece of the tent, or the instructions don't make much sense, or you're struggling in the rain or the dark to work out what goes where.
3. Pay attention to the hydrostatic head rating (hh rating). Basically, this tells you how waterproof your tent is, and is a good guide as to how well your tent will perform in the rain. The higher the rating the better the protection. A rating of 1000 will protect against a light shower with no wind. A rating of 3000 or above is what you should be looking for for camping in this country. And the tent's groundsheet should be at least 3000 (& ideally be 5000) because of the pressure of people pushing down on it.
4. What are you going to do if it rains while you're camping? Are you planning on hiding in the tent, or heading somewhere that's warm & dry (e.g. a pub)? If you're going to hunker down in the tent then take into account how much room you will have inside the tent. If you want to be able to move about then you'll need a bigger tent than if you're happy lying next to each other.
5. You might want to consider a footprint. This is basically a tarpaulin that fits under the tent. It stops the underneath of the tent from getting dirty (it's easier to clean a tarp than a tent), and it offers additional waterproofing protection for the tent's groundsheet. You don't need to buy a special footprint for your tent, cheap tarp will work just as well but make sure that the tarp is tucked under the outer edges of the tent (otherwise when it rains it will just act as an under-tent water collector).
6. If you've not been camping before then try one night in your back garden or in a nearby campsite. You will get an idea of whether or not camping is for you before you've bought too much gear. You'll also find out whether the tent you've bought is suited to what you want/expect from a tent.
SqueakyWalker17/05/2020 10:02

Anyone know if this is suitable for 3 women?


Have a click through to the deal it shows the dimensions, personally I'd prefer a bigger tent, if you click through you can look at their full range of tents and in the 4-5 section they've got This tent it's a bit more expensive £25 or so but there's more room and you can stand up in it.

Oh yeah even though I've just made two comments I'm certainly no tent expert the furthest we got in ours was a night in the front garden to test it last summer
cis_groupie17/05/2020 10:37

Some advice about tents:1. From years of experience, if a tent is …Some advice about tents:1. From years of experience, if a tent is described as "3 man" then it will fit 2 people & their kit, or 3 people & no kit. So always go for the next size up to what you think you need (so if there are 3 of you then buy a 4 man tent). 2. Always always ALWAYS practice putting up the tent before going camping. The campsite is not the place to find out that you're missing a vital piece of the tent, or the instructions don't make much sense, or you're struggling in the rain or the dark to work out what goes where. 3. Pay attention to the hydrostatic head rating (hh rating). Basically, this tells you how waterproof your tent is, and is a good guide as to how well your tent will perform in the rain. The higher the rating the better the protection. A rating of 1000 will protect against a light shower with no wind. A rating of 3000 or above is what you should be looking for for camping in this country. And the tent's groundsheet should be at least 3000 (& ideally be 5000) because of the pressure of people pushing down on it.4. What are you going to do if it rains while you're camping? Are you planning on hiding in the tent, or heading somewhere that's warm & dry (e.g. a pub)? If you're going to hunker down in the tent then take into account how much room you will have inside the tent. If you want to be able to move about then you'll need a bigger tent than if you're happy lying next to each other.5. You might want to consider a footprint. This is basically a tarpaulin that fits under the tent. It stops the underneath of the tent from getting dirty (it's easier to clean a tarp than a tent), and it offers additional waterproofing protection for the tent's groundsheet. You don't need to buy a special footprint for your tent, cheap tarp will work just as well but make sure that the tarp is tucked under the outer edges of the tent (otherwise when it rains it will just act as an under-tent water collector).6. If you've not been camping before then try one night in your back garden or in a nearby campsite. You will get an idea of whether or not camping is for you before you've bought too much gear. You'll also find out whether the tent you've bought is suited to what you want/expect from a tent.


Sound advice. Thanks
If you've not camped, buy it, try it, look after it...if camping isn't for you, you'll probably sell it for over half price you paid..if camping is for you, sell it and get a better one using the experience you've gained..
Edited by: "Johnboy..." 17th May
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