Exquisite Imperial Easter Egg £3.99 instore only @ Aldi
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Exquisite Imperial Easter Egg £3.99 instore only @ Aldi

£3.99£8.9956%ALDI Deals
11
LocalFound 2nd Apr
Enjoy something special this Easter with this uniquely designed egg.

As stunning as it is delicious. This intricately engraved milk chocolate egg is hand decorated with gold lustre and finished with our exquisite dark chocolate seal.


Size / Weight:
265g

Instore only at Aldi £3.99

Was £8.99
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11 Comments
All Easter eggs are half price in Aldi
ministrymason2 m ago

All Easter eggs are half price in Aldi


I did know that..
Been into Aldi at cleveleys all eggs same price
After Easter's gone, it's just chocolate, that happens to be in an egg shape in a fancy box but it is still @ £15.05 /kg
Pop into Lidl and you are spoiled for choice with various deluxe chocolate varieties at £10 /kg or less. Aldi probably have some decent chocolate in a bar for a lot less too!
"Imperial" easter eggs in aldi just sounds wrong lol.
Makes you wonder how much they rip you off on Easter eggs, if they can reduce them up to half price, and they are still making money.
sweetpea106 h, 55 m ago

Makes you wonder how much they rip you off on Easter eggs, if they can …Makes you wonder how much they rip you off on Easter eggs, if they can reduce them up to half price, and they are still making money.


It doesn't work like that.

Manufacturing is expensive and I expect thorntons per kg at standard cost to make 70% gm with a net around 15-20% - chocolate is a commodity category where costs per kg production is widely known by all both manufacturing and retailing side, and quantities are determined up to 6-9 months before Easter. It may be that the retailer over ordered or the manufacturers over produced based on forecasts which aren't foolproof by any means. The retailers will drive down margins (knowing rough GM and net margin numbers) and supply will generally be coming from Europe where we're struggling with cost price inflation with fx rates (though I'd expect thorntons to be hedged a few years in advance) so your manufacturer is being squeezed both sides.

So in order to shift their stock they can reduce to cost price, or even do it as a loss leader post easter as you might throw in a few other higher margin products making your basket overall more profitable. But if you didn't, and bought yourself loadsa loadsa eggs (which is frankly ridiculous - most buying arent going to eat or give THAT many Easter eggs a few days after easter - justg wanting to hoard because it's cheap) then it could be the company makes literally zero or even negative on that basket simply because they have a fixed cost base to cover, with a commodity product with an absolute finite time based value on it. Keep in mind that often they're discounted from RRP at retail level in run up, 2 for £x etc so margin is eroded further and usually manufacturer funded unless you're already one of the big boys.

I'm not suggesting they're not making money - they exist to make money, but we live in such a weird culture where consumers expect everything for nothing that has created razor thin margins that a lot of chocolate operators can't maintain and just concentrates production to big guys. I'm all for price competitiveness but this way of thinking can make it nigh on impossible for young companies without huge funding to go and capture some market share because prices and margins have already reached the lowest common denominator that there's no room for them to be there. And it is their existence that is VITAL in ensuring price competitiveness.

I know as I was part of a UK based small business employing 6 people who lost out to a few big contracts just by being a couple pence more expensive but had we lowered our prices to match we would be making a loss because of everything that surrounds it. When you're buying it's easy to be blind to the realities of this sometimes.

Especially eggs > they're a real nasty ballache to do in any serious quantity unless you're already hugely automated at every stage.

Finally if you want an industry that makes stupid levels of money thinking British gas residential - though remember their profits go to offset incredibly expensive exploration projects or market pressures in trading environments - they defo make a killing but it's much much more complicated than most manufacturing cos.

Not a rant or an argument creation just something to think about.
Edited by: "Ourkid1010" 3rd Apr
Ourkid101011 h, 33 m ago

It doesn't work like that.Manufacturing is expensive and I expect …It doesn't work like that.Manufacturing is expensive and I expect thorntons per kg at standard cost to make 70% gm with a net around 15-20% - chocolate is a commodity category where costs per kg production is widely known by all both manufacturing and retailing side, and quantities are determined up to 6-9 months before Easter. It may be that the retailer over ordered or the manufacturers over produced based on forecasts which aren't foolproof by any means. The retailers will drive down margins (knowing rough GM and net margin numbers) and supply will generally be coming from Europe where we're struggling with cost price inflation with fx rates (though I'd expect thorntons to be hedged a few years in advance) so your manufacturer is being squeezed both sides.So in order to shift their stock they can reduce to cost price, or even do it as a loss leader post easter as you might throw in a few other higher margin products making your basket overall more profitable. But if you didn't, and bought yourself loadsa loadsa eggs (which is frankly ridiculous - most buying arent going to eat or give THAT many Easter eggs a few days after easter - justg wanting to hoard because it's cheap) then it could be the company makes literally zero or even negative on that basket simply because they have a fixed cost base to cover, with a commodity product with an absolute finite time based value on it. Keep in mind that often they're discounted from RRP at retail level in run up, 2 for £x etc so margin is eroded further and usually manufacturer funded unless you're already one of the big boys. I'm not suggesting they're not making money - they exist to make money, but we live in such a weird culture where consumers expect everything for nothing that has created razor thin margins that a lot of chocolate operators can't maintain and just concentrates production to big guys. I'm all for price competitiveness but this way of thinking can make it nigh on impossible for young companies without huge funding to go and capture some market share because prices and margins have already reached the lowest common denominator that there's no room for them to be there. And it is their existence that is VITAL in ensuring price competitiveness.I know as I was part of a UK based small business employing 6 people who lost out to a few big contracts just by being a couple pence more expensive but had we lowered our prices to match we would be making a loss because of everything that surrounds it. When you're buying it's easy to be blind to the realities of this sometimes.Especially eggs > they're a real nasty ballache to do in any serious quantity unless you're already hugely automated at every stage.Finally if you want an industry that makes stupid levels of money thinking British gas residential - though remember their profits go to offset incredibly expensive exploration projects or market pressures in trading environments - they defo make a killing but it's much much more complicated than most manufacturing cos.Not a rant or an argument creation just something to think about.


I cannot think about much, after reading that lot, although War & Peace does spring to mind !
sweetpea103rd Apr

I cannot think about much, after reading that lot, although War & Peace …I cannot think about much, after reading that lot, although War & Peace does spring to mind !


Its all too easy to label something a "rip off" without understanding the business mechanics behind why something is priced where it is. Not every company is out to shaft people and feed it into their shareholders pockets.

A lot are though no doubt.
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