Fairtrade® Dozen Roses (Pre-Order) £22 Delivered @ M&S
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Fairtrade® Dozen Roses (Pre-Order) £22 Delivered @ M&S

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Avatardeleted1416210
Found 2nd Feb 2016
Not just any roses........
Ethically sourced Dozen red roses delivered in a box.
I think these represent quality at an excellent price.
Show your loved one how much you care this Valentine’s Day with these stunning Fairtrade® Kenyan Roses.
Add a GIFT MESSAGE to your order once it’s in your shopping bag.
Free delivery to a UK address* on the date of your choice.
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6 Comments
Ethically sourced picked by our very own ethnic magority, i can remember when half my family worked on farms ... but alas ..... no more
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deleted1416210Original Poster
psmith1958

Ethically sourced picked by our very own ethnic magority, i can remember … Ethically sourced picked by our very own ethnic magority, i can remember when half my family worked on farms ... but alas ..... no more


Is it possible to get that many UK grown roses in February?
PrincessJellybean

Is it possible to get that many UK grown roses in February?



I saw your comment and I laughed so hard. A girl with some common sense lol. Also your pic is a galaxy in the making? Shizz, I need you to have words with my woman. Or become her sister wife haha. (just kidding).

These "fair trade" and "british majority" posts make me roll my eyes. It's as though the other flowers we get come from bloody boats off off india, syria or china. What are these morons on?

P.s: Psmith, I remember when most of the country worked in coal mines also, and farms, AND mills. The world has moved on and people have become doctors, lawyers and engineers.
MadonnaProject

I saw your comment and I laughed so hard. A girl with some common sense … I saw your comment and I laughed so hard. A girl with some common sense lol. Also your pic is a galaxy in the making? Shizz, I need you to have words with my woman. Or become her sister wife haha. (just kidding).These "fair trade" and "british majority" posts make me roll my eyes. It's as though the other flowers we get come from bloody boats off off india, syria or china. What are these morons on?P.s: Psmith, I remember when most of the country worked in coal mines also, and farms, AND mills. The world has moved on and people have become doctors, lawyers and engineers.



​and which one of the above have you become .... all of them most probs
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deleted1416210Original Poster
psmith1958

Ethically sourced picked by our very own ethnic magority, i can remember … Ethically sourced picked by our very own ethnic magority, i can remember when half my family worked on farms ... but alas ..... no more


I think your entirely missing the point, or just looking for an outlet for your skewed agenda.
These Fairtrade Kenyan roses, are presumably picked by Kenyans in Kenya.
Buying these roses has no effect on the employment of your family
It will however ensure good working standards for the Kenyans who provide the roses.
The employment of your family has nothing to do with Kenya or Roses.
Changes in farming, agriculture and horticulture in Britain are as MadonnaProject suggests a consequences of times changing. I too had many family members employed on farms in the 50's, but Britain changed, agriculture became increasingly mechanized and the service sector took over the previously more manual labour base.
Changes in education,welfare systems and peoples outlooks mean that many of the agricultural type jobs that remain have become less appealing to British workers.
'Foriegn' labour is taken on, as it was in the 70's in many sectors, because there is a gap in the market where British workers cannot, or will not take the jobs, because of long hours, hard work, the often seasonal nature of the work, and in some instances low pay.
British farmers have had their profits squeezed by the big supermarkets to a point now where many make a loss on the hope of better things to come.
If you want to support 'British' farming, use your head... don't barge in on threads that have nothing to do with your 'agenda'.
Buy your products locally, buy British where you can (good luck finding British Roses at this time of year).
Buy from small independent retailers, buy from markets.
Think before you buy... your are posting on a website that revels in low prices, but it is often these low prices that are the root of many problems.
When milk is being sold for 90p for a big carton... think! British farmers cannot survive if we expect prices to be this low.
Consumers have a lot of power and if you want British farming to survive
you have to think before you buy.
Sometimes you have to stop blaming others, stop blaming governments and just think a little more on how your actions impact the bigger picture.


Edited by: "deleted1416210" 3rd Feb 2016
PrincessJellybean

I think your entirely missing the point, or just looking for an outlet … I think your entirely missing the point, or just looking for an outlet for your skewed agenda.These Fairtrade Kenyan roses, are presumably picked by Kenyans in Kenya.Buying these roses has no effect on the employment of your familyIt will however ensure good working standards for the Kenyans who provide the roses.The employment of your family has nothing to do with Kenya or Roses.Changes in farming, agriculture and horticulture in Britain are as MadonnaProject suggests a consequences of times changing. I too had many family members employed on farms in the 50's, but Britain changed, agriculture because increasingly mechanized and the service sector took over the previously more manual labour base. Changes in education,welfare systems and peoples outlooks mean that many of the agricultural type jobs that remain have become less appealing to British workers.'Foriegn' labour is taken on, as it was in the 70's in many sectors, because there is a gap in the market where British workers cannot, or will not take the jobs, because of long hours, hard work, the often seasonal nature of the work, and in some instances low pay.British farmers have had their profits squeezed by the big supermarkets to a point now where many make a loss on the hope of better things to come. If you want to support 'British' farming, use your head... don't barge in on threads that have nothing to do with your 'agenda'.Buy your products locally, buy British where you can (good luck finding British Roses at this time of year). Buy from small independent retailers, buy from markets.Think before you buy... your are posting on a website that revels in low prices, but it is often these low prices that are the root of many problems. When milk is being sold for 90p for a big carton... think! British farmers cannot survive if we expect prices to be this low.Consumers have a lot of power and if you want British farming to survive you have to think before you buy.Sometimes you have to stop blaming others, stop blaming governments and just think a little more on how your actions impact the bigger picture.




Thats the hottest Burn i've seen for a while. Well said princess.
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