Fender Player Duo Sonic HS Ice Blue Metallic PF £399 @ Guitar Guitar
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Fender Player Duo Sonic HS Ice Blue Metallic PF £399 @ Guitar Guitar

£399£49920% Free P&P FreeGUITARGUITAR Deals
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Fender Player Duo Sonic HS Ice Blue Metallic PF £399 @ Guitar Guitar
Posted 14th Sep
Other colours available at GuitarGuitar


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The Fender Offset Duo Sonic offers a fresh take on a classic guitar. With a tasteful vintage aesthetic and a collection of modern modifications, it’s a beautiful guitar that packs a big tone and stands out from the crowd of more traditional Fenders. We totally love this Metallic Ice Blue version of the Duo Sonic and think it would be a great investment for beginners or an excellent option professional musicians looking for a stylish, affordable and reliable guitar.

Features We Love:

Duo Sonic History

The original Duo Sonic was first introduced back in 1956 as a low cost “student” model, similar to the Mustang in size, the Duo Sonic was loved for its rounded tones and simple design. It went through a few design changes through its run until it was discontinued in 1969. The Duo Sonic went on to live a second life as a popular choice of the alternative and new wave movements. As an affordable guitar found in pawn shops, Duo Sonics landed in the hands of many iconic musicians, such as David Byrne from Talking Heads, Dean Ween from Ween and Martin Gore from Depeche Mode. Thanks to its resurgence in popularity, the Duo Sonic has received several reissues over the last 30 years, this latest version represents a modded classic, with a humbucker pickup and Strat-style bridge.

Duo Sonic Pickups

The combination of a single-coil in the neck position and humbucker in the bridge lets this guitar stand out from the rest. With the humbucker giving the guitar a big tone that’s great for alternative and grungy tones and the single-coil allowing you to add a little more of that signature Fender chime to your sound.

24” Scale

The Duo Sonic is loved for its smaller body size and shorter scale, this benefits younger players, players with smaller hands or those who plan on being active on stage. It’s also a great choice for beginners as it’s a guitar that is always comfortable and never feels limiting. Plus the fact that it looks great doesn’t hurt either!:)
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27 Comments
Nice!
Yeah looks good for the money


again cool for the indie kids out there
Edited by: "freddyfender" 14th Sep
Get one with a humbucker on the bridge if you plan to buy this as a first instrument for some added versatility.
Edited by: "yomanation" 14th Sep
Oh man I want one of these.
that top cutaway just looks a bit too eww for me

description says £339 yet post says £399 too btw
How do you get £339? Is there a code?
martinelsen14/09/2020 19:55

that top cutaway just looks a bit too eww for medescription says £339 yet …that top cutaway just looks a bit too eww for medescription says £339 yet post says £399 too btw


Must’ve been one of the mods, I never put prices in the descriptions.
Great guitars. They sell for about this used. Every bit as premium as a strat or tele, just not as popular.
it’s not £339 man - can you amend the post?
yomanation14/09/2020 19:05

Get one with a humbucker on the bridge if you plan to buy this as a first …Get one with a humbucker on the bridge if you plan to buy this as a first instrument for some added versatility.


Lol what on earth is that even supposed to mean? Having a humbucker in the bridge really has nothing to do with versatility
llocou15/09/2020 20:20

Lol what on earth is that even supposed to mean? Having a humbucker in the …Lol what on earth is that even supposed to mean? Having a humbucker in the bridge really has nothing to do with versatility


It does, because some genres basically need a humbucker in the bridge, while on the neck a single coil can be preferable. A bridge single coil pickup is not ideal for a whole lot of things. Obviously up to preference, but I would argue HS is more versatile to SS by quite a margin.
Edited by: "yomanation" 15th Sep
yomanation15/09/2020 20:33

It does, because some genres basically need a humbucker in the bridge, …It does, because some genres basically need a humbucker in the bridge, while on the neck a single coil can be preferable. A bridge single coil pickup is not ideal for a whole lot of things. Obviously up to preference, but I would argue HS is more versatile to SS by quite a margin.


Some pickup arrangements may suit some styles, but as we're talking about beginner recommendations here it's really not going to be the difference in someone's versatility as a player at an entry level. Still I'm sure there must comparison vids on YouTube that a potential buyer could check out in any case.
I love them but just cant get with the hardtail bridge. Just doesn’t feel like a ‘stang without that bridge! Good price though for a good guitar.
Similar pricing available at PMT Online
Very good price.. Thanks a lot
llocou15/09/2020 22:10

Some pickup arrangements may suit some styles, but as we're talking about …Some pickup arrangements may suit some styles, but as we're talking about beginner recommendations here it's really not going to be the difference in someone's versatility as a player at an entry level. Still I'm sure there must comparison vids on YouTube that a potential buyer could check out in any case.


Surely one humbucker and one single is going to be more versatile than two singles in terms of the spectrum of different types of sound that will be possible?
Not bad if you feel you need 'fender' on the headstock, otherwise I'd look at other guitars in the price range. You can get a really nice Epiphone or Squier for that cash, that will probably be better than these.
You can get a squire custom vibe (Strat/Telent) in this price range which are imo superior to these instruments if you’re not going for a particular look or sound, especially the telecaster.
always leaned more towards single coils myself....prefer the sound and more suited to my style of playing ..

always thought they suit open chords a lot more than humbucks....which i would have thought might be better for a beginner?

400 quid for a decent guitar....cant go wrong
Edited by: "freddyfender" 16th Sep
Get the maple board . Pau Ferro is horrible compared to rosewood.
llocou15/09/2020 22:10

Some pickup arrangements may suit some styles, but as we're talking about …Some pickup arrangements may suit some styles, but as we're talking about beginner recommendations here it's really not going to be the difference in someone's versatility as a player at an entry level. Still I'm sure there must comparison vids on YouTube that a potential buyer could check out in any case.


It's exactly because we are talking about beginner recommendations that I think HS is far superior to SS. If it was a weathered player they know what they need. I doubt YouTube videos will really help much, beginners don't really have an ear for such things.

freddyfender16/09/2020 08:45

always leaned more towards single coils myself....prefer the sound and …always leaned more towards single coils myself....prefer the sound and more suited to my style of playing ..always thought they suit open chords a lot more than humbucks....which i would have thought might be better for a beginner?400 quid for a decent guitar....cant go wrong


It's not so much about chords, it's more about playing clean. Unless it's jazz where they really want those very thick sounding bassy tones, clean usually sounds better with single coils. But clean sounds better on the neck pickup, and you get a single coil on the neck regardless. The bridge on the other hand can give a nice boost if it's a humbucker and allow to play with high distortion as well without hum. Of course it's down to preference in the end, Malmsteen plays with high gain and always used single coils, but for a beginner I would always recommend an HSS configuration (or HS in this case), it gives them more options to play with.
Edited by: "yomanation" 16th Sep
Dan_Lawrance16/09/2020 12:53

Get the maple board . Pau Ferro is horrible compared to rosewood.


Why do they still use Pau Ferro? I thought all that CITIES nonsense was sorted?
yomanation16/09/2020 13:14

It's exactly because we are talking about beginner recommendations that I …It's exactly because we are talking about beginner recommendations that I think HS is far superior to SS. If it was a weathered player they know what they need. I doubt YouTube videos will really help much, beginners don't really have an ear for such things.It's not so much about chords, it's more about playing clean. Unless it's jazz where they really want those very thick sounding bassy tones, clean usually sounds better with single coils. But clean sounds better on the neck pickup, and you get a single coil on the neck regardless. The bridge on the other hand can give a nice boost if it's a humbucker and allow to play with high distortion as well without hum. Of course it's down to preference in the end, Malmsteen plays with high gain and always used single coils, but for a beginner I would always recommend an HSS configuration (or HS in this case), it gives them more options to play with.


Yes fair enough I see what you mean. But I think it's confusing for a beginner to look at this thread, think "wow I like the look for that seafoam green guitar" and then be put off by your comment because you can't get it in HS configuration. I just don't see it holding back a beginner. You mentioned Malmsteen and there are plenty of others that work heavy tones on single coils - Tom Morello or Gary Moore or Jimmy Page for example. If beginners don't have an ear for the difference between H/S, then why should they worry about it? I don't suppose we'll agree, I just think it's quite a sweeping statement to make. My main guitar is a SS Tele that I've never found to be limiting and I like to play quite a variety of genres, both at home/live.
llocou16/09/2020 17:27

Yes fair enough I see what you mean. But I think it's confusing for a …Yes fair enough I see what you mean. But I think it's confusing for a beginner to look at this thread, think "wow I like the look for that seafoam green guitar" and then be put off by your comment because you can't get it in HS configuration. I just don't see it holding back a beginner. You mentioned Malmsteen and there are plenty of others that work heavy tones on single coils - Tom Morello or Gary Moore or Jimmy Page for example. If beginners don't have an ear for the difference between H/S, then why should they worry about it? I don't suppose we'll agree, I just think it's quite a sweeping statement to make. My main guitar is a SS Tele that I've never found to be limiting and I like to play quite a variety of genres, both at home/live.


Of course a beginner wouldn't worry about their pickup configuration, that's why I'm saying just go with H/S and maybe later down the line you will realize what difference a humbucker makes, while if you don't have that option you will be perhaps left wondering. There are far more important things for a beginner to worry about... mainly to learn how to play.
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