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Ferrari I-Max SP Luxe Group Black 1-2-3 Car Seat £52.49 / Ferrari Beline SP Group Red 1 2 3 Car Seat £45.94 delivered @ Dunelm
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Ferrari I-Max SP Luxe Group Black 1-2-3 Car Seat £52.49 / Ferrari Beline SP Group Red 1 2 3 Car Seat £45.94 delivered @ Dunelm

£45.94£9954%Dunelm Deals
37
Refreshed 22nd Sep 2018 (Posted 4th Sep 2018)
Very good price, shows free delivery at checkout on the more expensive model, even has a built in alarm incase your child decides they want to do a runner! - Get deal button goes to all aval ----

suitable for children between 9-36kg (approx. 9 months to 11 years)


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The Ferrari Imax SP Luxe is a comfortable and stylish Group 123 high back booster with harness. This official Ferrari car seat has a height adjustable head support with side impact protection, swivel arm rests for ease of access and a simple recline mechanism for sleeping children. It also has individual harness tensioners to ensure that both sides of the harness are tightened correctly. There is a removable body support cushion for younger children and it also has chest and buckle pads for comfort and safety. The cover is removable and hand washable. The Ferrari I-Max has a built-in safety alarm to alert you to any escape attempts from your little passenger



The Ferrari Beline SP is a stylish and comfortable Group 123 high back booster which is suitable for children between 9-36kg (approx. 9 months to 11 years). It has a height adjustable head support with side impact protection which grows with your child. It comes equipped with individual harness tensioners for extra security which ensure that both sides of the harness are tightened correctly and safely. There are also chest and buckle pads for comfort and safety. The seat also has a removable body support cushion for younger children, and the seat has extra padding to add comfort for longer journeys. The cover is removable and hand washable. The Ferrari Beline SP has a built-in safety alarm to alert you to any escape attempts from your little passenger

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... this is probably the best chance I have of getting a Ferrari ...
Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be sold in Europe are far from rigorous. R44/04 only requires a seat to protect the child in a 30mph frontal collision with a stationary object and a 18mph rear collision. There is no side impact test. The new R129 (or i-size) regulation adds a side impact collision at 18mph to the list of tests.

These generic seats (which are made either by Team Tex in France or a couple of Chinese companies) are made as cheaply as possible to withstand a collision at 30mph, but offer no protection beyond that. Seats that big brands develop and manufacture themselves are of a much better build quality and are tested in-house at their own facilities at greater crash speeds of 50mph. They are also side impact tested, and have been for years even though the R44 regulation didn’t require them to pass any such test. Unfortunately the better build quality and testing that goes into branded seats does make them more expensive, but they are far superior safety-wise to a cheap seat that you can pick up from Argos or a supermarket shelf.

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing what happens to these generic re-branded seats (which are sold under the own labels of Mothercare, Halfords, Kiddicare, Nania, Obaby to name a few) in a collision. The problem is the harness - those ones with the individual ‘buckle’ adjusters on each strap are a major problem because they are not on a continuous loop like the big brands use for their harnesses (where you pull a strap between the child’s legs to tighten the harness) - on these cheap seats the strap simply goes through to the back of the seat and is held there by a thin piece of metal (I think I have a photo...), and crash tests show that in a collision above 30mph the force of the child being thrown forward and pulling on the harness leads to the entire back of the seat just breaking and allowing the child’s body to be thrown forward out of the seat. This is a really big problem with seats like the one in this photo as a lot of parents think they can just keep using the 5-point harness for as long as they want to when in fact once the child reaches 18kg you have to take the straps out and use it as a booster. Obviously having a child in the harness who is too heavy increases the risk of the back of the seat ripping out.







35084567.jpg



So in summary buying a child seat from a supermarket or an own-brand generic seat isn’t a great idea. If your budget really is tight go second hand on the things that aren’t going to potentially save your child’s life, like pram, clothes, toys etc and save for a decent child seat. Ask for money towards a new seat for the baby’s first birthday. Joie are the most affordable range of safe seats, and they are one of the only manufacturers who will openly tell parents that rear facing seats are much safer than forward facing ones for young children.

Edited by: "andreah903" 5th Sep 2018
So, no isofix, unknown manufacturer, no safety standards or tests mentioned? Would you really trust this?
37 Comments
... this is probably the best chance I have of getting a Ferrari ...
Why?
It's coming up as 52.49£ ..is there a code to get it down to 45.94
Can u use it for both iso and seat belt?
It’s £52.49, only available for delivery at £3.95 on top.
troppotzika42 m ago

It's coming up as 52.49£ ..is there a code to get it down to 45.94


He’s listed two in the description, but it links to the most expensive one.
So, no isofix, unknown manufacturer, no safety standards or tests mentioned? Would you really trust this?
KentishLad04/09/2018 13:08

So, no isofix, unknown manufacturer, no safety standards or tests …So, no isofix, unknown manufacturer, no safety standards or tests mentioned? Would you really trust this?


I’m sure Ferrari wouldn’t allow their name to be put on something that would jeopardise a child’s safety?
It's a Nania I max sp rebranded
W O W !
Heat added!
Avatar
deleted65393
If overtaking a car with German plates that has these seats then give it a very wide birth or it may well crash into you.
Can this car seat be attached on a Bugaboo?
Flamix2 h, 13 m ago

Can this car seat be attached on a Bugaboo?


If bugaboo is a brand of a full size car with seat belts? Then yes!
Flamix04/09/2018 19:01

Can this car seat be attached on a Bugaboo?


Not sure if this is a serious comment or not, but why would you spend hundreds on a fancy pram but only £50 on something that could potentially save your child’s life? Which this cheap seat probably wouldn’t do by the way.
andreah9035th Sep 2018

Not sure if this is a serious comment or not, but why would you spend …Not sure if this is a serious comment or not, but why would you spend hundreds on a fancy pram but only £50 on something that could potentially save your child’s life? Which this cheap seat probably wouldn’t do by the way.


I'm just wondering if there is an adapter to attached to the boogaboo frame, that is similar to Recaro baby car seat. Please see the attached images below.

35078161.jpg35078161.jpg

Edited by: "Flamix" 5th Sep 2018
No, it wouldn’t attach like that because it’s not that type of child seat. The one in this deal stays fixed into the car, you can’t carry your child around in it.
Haha.

Proof that Ferrari will slap their logo on anything.
andreah90305/09/2018 10:07

Not sure if this is a serious comment or not, but why would you spend …Not sure if this is a serious comment or not, but why would you spend hundreds on a fancy pram but only £50 on something that could potentially save your child’s life? Which this cheap seat probably wouldn’t do by the way.


I find that people always wanna go cheap for car seats!!! WHY!!!!
steverichards19724th Sep

... this is probably the best chance I have of getting a Ferrari ...


Have faith. Have faith. Oh, and use all the money you've saved on HUKD to contribute towards it.
huddsguy05/09/2018 13:01

I find that people always wanna go cheap for car seats!!! WHY!!!!


If you could perhaps source any statistics, studies or facts which show that the 'cheaper' seats (which are as far as I'm aware, subjected to same or equivalent rigorous safety tests and regulations as the expensive ones) are more dangerous and lead to higher injury or death compared to a more expensive seat.. that would be great.

The "it's more expensive, so it must be safer" point of view doesn't hold much sway with many due to car seats at any price point having to pass strict safety tests so if you could show anything which backs up your point of view, it would help immensely and maybe help people consider their next car seat purchase with a more informed decision.

Until then, folk will continue to buy £30-50 seats from supermarkets etc and others will buy £100-200 seats from mothercare etc.

Edited by: "itchyone" 5th Sep 2018
huddsguy05/09/2018 13:01

I find that people always wanna go cheap for car seats!!! WHY!!!!


Baby costs enough as it is. Might as well buy a plastic tat so I have more money to buy those nappies next week.
Edited by: "Billionaire" 5th Sep 2018
Ferrari seem willing to put their name on anything now, nearly as bad as Disney.
If you don't own a Ferrari and buy this.. then this is you
35083321-Md14Y.jpg

ikky10104/09/2018 13:30

I’m sure Ferrari wouldn’t allow their name to be put on something that wou …I’m sure Ferrari wouldn’t allow their name to be put on something that would jeopardise a child’s safety?


I don't think Ferrari cares much about the child's safety as far as they get royalties paid by licensee. If they would care they would probably choose well respected manufacturer who invests a lot in R&D of safety features.
Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be sold in Europe are far from rigorous. R44/04 only requires a seat to protect the child in a 30mph frontal collision with a stationary object and a 18mph rear collision. There is no side impact test. The new R129 (or i-size) regulation adds a side impact collision at 18mph to the list of tests.

These generic seats (which are made either by Team Tex in France or a couple of Chinese companies) are made as cheaply as possible to withstand a collision at 30mph, but offer no protection beyond that. Seats that big brands develop and manufacture themselves are of a much better build quality and are tested in-house at their own facilities at greater crash speeds of 50mph. They are also side impact tested, and have been for years even though the R44 regulation didn’t require them to pass any such test. Unfortunately the better build quality and testing that goes into branded seats does make them more expensive, but they are far superior safety-wise to a cheap seat that you can pick up from Argos or a supermarket shelf.

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing what happens to these generic re-branded seats (which are sold under the own labels of Mothercare, Halfords, Kiddicare, Nania, Obaby to name a few) in a collision. The problem is the harness - those ones with the individual ‘buckle’ adjusters on each strap are a major problem because they are not on a continuous loop like the big brands use for their harnesses (where you pull a strap between the child’s legs to tighten the harness) - on these cheap seats the strap simply goes through to the back of the seat and is held there by a thin piece of metal (I think I have a photo...), and crash tests show that in a collision above 30mph the force of the child being thrown forward and pulling on the harness leads to the entire back of the seat just breaking and allowing the child’s body to be thrown forward out of the seat. This is a really big problem with seats like the one in this photo as a lot of parents think they can just keep using the 5-point harness for as long as they want to when in fact once the child reaches 18kg you have to take the straps out and use it as a booster. Obviously having a child in the harness who is too heavy increases the risk of the back of the seat ripping out.







35084567.jpg



So in summary buying a child seat from a supermarket or an own-brand generic seat isn’t a great idea. If your budget really is tight go second hand on the things that aren’t going to potentially save your child’s life, like pram, clothes, toys etc and save for a decent child seat. Ask for money towards a new seat for the baby’s first birthday. Joie are the most affordable range of safe seats, and they are one of the only manufacturers who will openly tell parents that rear facing seats are much safer than forward facing ones for young children.

Edited by: "andreah903" 5th Sep 2018
andreah9039 m ago

Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be …Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be sold in Europe are far from rigorous. R44/04 only requires a seat to protect the child in a 30mph frontal collision with a stationary object and a 18mph rear collision. There is no side impact test. The new R129 (or i-size) regulation adds a side impact collision at 18mph to the list of tests. These generic seats (which are made either by Team Tex in France or a couple of Chinese companies) are made as cheaply as possible to withstand a collision at 30mph, but offer no protection beyond that. Seats that big brands develop and manufacture themselves are of a much better build quality and are tested in-house at their own facilities at greater crash speeds of 50mph. They are also side impact tested, and have been for years even though the R44 regulation didn’t require them to pass any such test. Unfortunately the better build quality and testing that goes into branded seats does make them more expensive, but they are far superior safety-wise to a cheap seat that you can pick up from Argos or a supermarket shelf. There are plenty of YouTube videos showing what happens to these generic re-branded seats (which are sold under the own labels of Mothercare, Halfords, Kiddicare, Nania, Obaby to name a few) in a collision. The problem is the harness - those ones with the individual ‘buckle’ adjusters on each strap are a major problem because they are not on a continuous loop like the big brands use for their harnesses (where you pull a strap between the child’s legs to tighten the harness) - on these cheap seats the strap simply goes through to the back of the seat and is held there by a thin piece of metal (I think I have a photo...), and crash tests show that in a collision above 30mph the force of the child being thrown forward and pulling on the harness leads to the entire back of the seat just breaking and allowing the child’s body to be thrown forward out of the seat. This is a really big problem with seats like the one in this photo as a lot of parents think they can just keep using the 5-point harness for as long as they want to when in fact once the child reaches 18kg you have to take the straps out and use it as a booster. Obviously having a child in the harness who is too heavy increases the risk of the back of the seat ripping out. [Video] [Video] [Video] [Image] So in summary buying a child seat from a supermarket or an own-brand generic seat isn’t a great idea. If your budget really is tight go second hand on the things that aren’t going to potentially save your child’s life, like pram, clothes, toys etc and save for a decent child seat. Ask for money towards a new seat for the baby’s first birthday. Joie are the most affordable range of safe seats, and they are one of the only manufacturers who will openly tell parents that rear facing seats are much safer than forward facing ones for young children.


An excellent and informative response. Many thanks.
itchyone05/09/2018 13:35

If you could perhaps source any statistics, studies or facts which show …If you could perhaps source any statistics, studies or facts which show that the 'cheaper' seats (which are as far as I'm aware, subjected to same or equivalent rigorous safety tests and regulations as the expensive ones) are more dangerous and lead to higher injury or death compared to a more expensive seat.. that would be great. The "it's more expensive, so it must be safer" point of view doesn't hold much sway with many due to car seats at any price point having to pass strict safety tests so if you could show anything which backs up your point of view, it would help immensely and maybe help people consider their next car seat purchase with a more informed decision. Until then, folk will continue to buy £30-50 seats from supermarkets etc and others will buy £100-200 seats from mothercare etc.


Which offer very good tests for real life and the trial is a pound. Top seats are usually Cybex, Recaro and Britax. Lower end generally (but absolutely not exclusively) the cheap ones
Aquaslim2 h, 30 m ago

I don't think Ferrari cares much about the child's safety as far as they …I don't think Ferrari cares much about the child's safety as far as they get royalties paid by licensee. If they would care they would probably choose well respected manufacturer who invests a lot in R&D of safety features.


Umm maybe you are right. I don’t know much about the car seat world.
KentishLad05/09/2018 19:52

Which offer very good tests for real life and the trial is a pound. Top …Which offer very good tests for real life and the trial is a pound. Top seats are usually Cybex, Recaro and Britax. Lower end generally (but absolutely not exclusively) the cheap ones


You have to be a little careful with Which though - they mark great seats (like the Swedish Plus tested) Britax Maxway down because they’re hard to fit for example. However if you go to a seat specialist (NOT Halfords or Mothercare!) then they will show you how to fit these seats properly so how easy or otherwise they are to fit is a non-issue.

The Plus test is the most stringent child seat safety test in the world - if they pass a seat it’s a good buy in my book.
Billionaire5th Sep

Baby costs enough as it is. Might as well buy a plastic tat so I have more …Baby costs enough as it is. Might as well buy a plastic tat so I have more money to buy those nappies next week.


That's true. And you can always find a cheap wheelchair on here if you're involved in an accident using this seat ..
andreah9035 h, 16 m ago

Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be …Firstly, the safety tests that a child seat must pass to be allowed to be sold in Europe are far from rigorous. R44/04 only requires a seat to protect the child in a 30mph frontal collision with a stationary object and a 18mph rear collision. There is no side impact test. The new R129 (or i-size) regulation adds a side impact collision at 18mph to the list of tests. These generic seats (which are made either by Team Tex in France or a couple of Chinese companies) are made as cheaply as possible to withstand a collision at 30mph, but offer no protection beyond that. Seats that big brands develop and manufacture themselves are of a much better build quality and are tested in-house at their own facilities at greater crash speeds of 50mph. They are also side impact tested, and have been for years even though the R44 regulation didn’t require them to pass any such test. Unfortunately the better build quality and testing that goes into branded seats does make them more expensive, but they are far superior safety-wise to a cheap seat that you can pick up from Argos or a supermarket shelf. There are plenty of YouTube videos showing what happens to these generic re-branded seats (which are sold under the own labels of Mothercare, Halfords, Kiddicare, Nania, Obaby to name a few) in a collision. The problem is the harness - those ones with the individual ‘buckle’ adjusters on each strap are a major problem because they are not on a continuous loop like the big brands use for their harnesses (where you pull a strap between the child’s legs to tighten the harness) - on these cheap seats the strap simply goes through to the back of the seat and is held there by a thin piece of metal (I think I have a photo...), and crash tests show that in a collision above 30mph the force of the child being thrown forward and pulling on the harness leads to the entire back of the seat just breaking and allowing the child’s body to be thrown forward out of the seat. This is a really big problem with seats like the one in this photo as a lot of parents think they can just keep using the 5-point harness for as long as they want to when in fact once the child reaches 18kg you have to take the straps out and use it as a booster. Obviously having a child in the harness who is too heavy increases the risk of the back of the seat ripping out. [Video] [Video] [Video] [Image] So in summary buying a child seat from a supermarket or an own-brand generic seat isn’t a great idea. If your budget really is tight go second hand on the things that aren’t going to potentially save your child’s life, like pram, clothes, toys etc and save for a decent child seat. Ask for money towards a new seat for the baby’s first birthday. Joie are the most affordable range of safe seats, and they are one of the only manufacturers who will openly tell parents that rear facing seats are much safer than forward facing ones for young children.


Wow. One of the best replies here. Very useful and informative. All those people who say that all seats are equally safe as they meet basic safety standards finally will be silenced.
We've got Cybex Cloud and the next seat will be Cybex Sirona i-size. I wouldn't go for anything less safe than that.
deleted653934th Sep 2018

If overtaking a car with German plates that has these seats then give it a …If overtaking a car with German plates that has these seats then give it a very wide birth or it may well crash into you.


I have never overtaken a car with German plates... Only been overtaken by a car with German plates
Great price guess that is what hotukdeals is all about... grabbing a bargain!

But yes, ultimately this is a very poor quality made seat I would not recommend it to be a primary seat for a child

It could be useful as an additional seat like for grandparents on shorter journeys.
It just does not offer great protection for kids so avoid if you want this as a primary car seat.
lilbeastie05/09/2018 22:37

so how easy or otherwise they are to fit is a non-issue.


Thats not actually true is it. It is imperative that you know how to correctly fit your car seat. You can have the safest car seat in the world but if it's badly fitted then it's next to useless.

Take this examle, An on-the-spot roadside investigation by What Car? magazine, Leicestershire Police and Child Seat Safety Ltd found that only 31 of the 85 seats tested were fitted correctly (36 per cent).
Source: inews.co.uk/ess…ts/

So how easy it is to fit correctly is a very valid test criteria imho
Paradroid2 h, 8 m ago

Thats not actually true is it. It is imperative that you know how to …Thats not actually true is it. It is imperative that you know how to correctly fit your car seat. You can have the safest car seat in the world but if it's badly fitted then it's next to useless. Take this examle, An on-the-spot roadside investigation by What Car? magazine, Leicestershire Police and Child Seat Safety Ltd found that only 31 of the 85 seats tested were fitted correctly (36 per cent).Source: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/lifestyle/cars/car-news/shocking-number-children-put-risk-badly-fitted-car-seats/So how easy it is to fit correctly is a very valid test criteria imho


You conveniently didn't quote the part where I said to go to a seat specialist to be shown how to fit your seat? That bit's kinda crucial - even an "easy" seat can be fitted wrong. But if you arm yourself with proper advice from people who know what they're doing you remove that risk.

Rear-facing seats are almost universally harder to fit than their forward-facing counterparts. Yet they're all safer when used correctly. So using fitting difficulty as a deciding factor rather than ensuring ALL seats are used appropriately will mean kids sit less safely in cars.

And in any case, how many of the seats in your study were supposedly easy to fit? How many forward facing and how many rear? Without all the variables controlled and full results being presented you risk skewing the conclusions.
“Rear-facing seats are almost universally harder to fit than their forward-facing counterparts.”

I had my now-13 and 10 year old children in forward facing seats before they were a year old, however over the years I have discovered how much safer rear facing seats are and therefore my 6 1/2 year old has always been in a rear facing seat (and will be for a long time yet as she’s quite petite).

I can categorically state that all the rear facing seats I’ve had, or borrowed, have been a lot easier to fit than any forward facing seat I’ve used. I’m referring to seatbelt-fitted seats here, my car has three sets of isofix points along the middle row (it’s a 7 seater) but I’ve never felt the need to use an isofix seat.
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