Fierce CHEETAH Gaming PC, Intel Core i7 8700K 4.7GHz, 240GB SSD, 1TB HDD, 16GB RAM, GTX 1080 Ti 11GB - £1,882.95 @ GAME
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Fierce CHEETAH Gaming PC, Intel Core i7 8700K 4.7GHz, 240GB SSD, 1TB HDD, 16GB RAM, GTX 1080 Ti 11GB - £1,882.95 @ GAME

£1,882.95GAME Deals
52
Found 18th Mar
Includes a 24-inch 1080p/full HD monitor, an LED-Backlit gaming keyboard and mouse kit and a great stereo gaming headset. Equipped with vivid, customizable RGB LED lights, enabling further personalization for your build.

The Fierce CHEETAH Desktop Gaming PC is impressively fast. Featuring the new Intel Core i7 8700K, running at 3.7GHz (4.7GHz Turbo) across 6 cores and cooled by a superb All-In-One liquid cooler to push the performance of the other components in your PC, you'll have no issues destroying your opponents. Paired with the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB and 16GB of 2133MHz memory, you'll have great results running the latest games at 1080p.

This PC will be perfect for anyone looking to pick up gaming at the high end, with easy support for AAA game releases (GTA, CoD, BF, etc) and brilliant overall performance. These PCs can handle not only gaming, but office work, specialist programs and video editing without any hassle.

Storage comes in the shape of a 240GB Solid State Drive for super fast storage and games as well as a 1TB Hard Drive for a vast amount of file storage. Included is a 300Mbps Wireless Wi-Fi Network Adapter, and a standard UK or EU power cable, depending on your shipping address. All of our PCs are fully built, require no assembly and are tested by our experienced team of builders and quality control staff. This system does not include Windows. This PC does not include an optical drive. Any required software can be downloaded or installed via USB.

Specifications
Processor: Intel Core i7 8700K 3.7GHz (4.7GHz Turbo), 6 cores, All-In-One Liquid Cooler
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB
Memory: 16GB of DDR4 Memory running at 2133MHz
Storage: 240GB Solid State Drive, 1TB Hard Drive
Power Supply: 700W
Available Rear Ports: 4x USB3.1, 2x USB2.0
Triple monitor support
Operating System not included
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Top comments
Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in including a 1080p monitor as with that card you'd want to be running 1440p 60hz+ or 4K but heat for the price of an all in nearly complete setup
Edited by: "clonereeco" 18th Mar
ezzer7211 m ago

Great machine but all the silly coloured lights spoil it.


Turn them off then

Lol
As Already pointed out. This build is a mish mash of unsuitable parts. The board, tho we know it is likely a Z370 board will be the cheapest (not a BIG gripe).
The i7 doesnt go with 2133 ram (limits it at higher refresh rate gaming;even 7 and 8 series i3's are rated for 2400 ram so thats 2016 sylake parts shedding) The 1080 t.i. doesnt go with a 1080p cheap monitor of unknown refresh rate (limits the whole system in res AND Hz) The monitor is likely a £90 TN panel.
The SSD is either a sandisk plus (not bad), a WD green (~) or an A400 kingston (wouldnt touch it)
Guess which is cheapest? It could be even older tech, esp looking at the ram.
Power supply; REALLY CONCERNING with this level investment for parts. (i7, 1080t.i. z370)
I have NEVER come across a tier 2 or better 700 watt psu. It is likely an aerocool integrator (dreadful).possibly an evga b1 or a thermaltake TR2, none of which are reliable enough to risk those parts.

So, could we build it cheaper? For sure.
We leave out all the unsuitable crap and pay a pro £75 to assemble something that works as a whole.
This is a clearout of basement junk with an i7 and high end card thrown in..
Its a BAD idea.
Pushing 2K? I could walk in any indi pc shop and get a better deal built with a monitor thrown in.
Some of you commenters keep banging on about price comparing without realising that a heavy gaming pc built with a POS power supply is as risky as a touting drunk cab driver.
Strangely, the sort of people who buy these 'bargains' never come back 40 months down the line and admit it ran no better than an £800 system or that it caught fire while they were at work and burnt the house down.

'unknown brand'.



'$24'



dslreports.com/for…PSU

2014.

ETC.
Paying £1900 for this car boot sale is a really bad idea.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
52 Comments
mod
Nice find @anatolijus.katcynas - good first deal

Welcome!
Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in including a 1080p monitor as with that card you'd want to be running 1440p 60hz+ or 4K but heat for the price of an all in nearly complete setup
Edited by: "clonereeco" 18th Mar
Original Poster
You can also spread the cost over 4 months without paying any interests. I've tryed to find out the brand of graphics card, but they couldn't say which one it is.
clonereeco10 m ago

Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in …Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in including a 1080p monitor as with that card you'd want to be running 1440p 60hz+ or 4K but heat for the price of an all in nearly complete setup


agreed, this is close if not cheaper than parts cost, and unlike a lot of pre built systems, will be upgrades for a few years.
clonereeco13 m ago

Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in …Fairly decent considering current prices of GPU's , don't see the point in including a 1080p monitor as with that card you'd want to be running 1440p 60hz+ or 4K but heat for the price of an all in nearly complete setup


Seems slightly pointless agreed, would make sense if the monitor was a very high refresh rate, but seems unlikely as it isnt mentioned as a selling point. Obviously it has been done to pad out and make it a bundle, but to use such a (i suspect) awful monitor quality wise let alone resolution, would be rather foolish.
Great machine but all the silly coloured lights spoil it.
Original Poster
game.co.uk/en/…559
Same spec 160 quid less if you don't fancy all the extras
ezzer7211 m ago

Great machine but all the silly coloured lights spoil it.


Turn them off then

Lol
Build it yourself, you'll save money
jasonq79410 m ago

Build it yourself, you'll save money


How much money
Would this run Minecraft at 720p
jasonq79439 m ago

Build it yourself, you'll save money


No you won't. Not in this market.
ritchiedrama11 m ago

No you won't. Not in this market.



Use pcpartpicker and you can build it for a lot cheaper, without a motherboard (don't ask) and no monitor it's around £1415 leaving £470 for a monitor, motherboard, keyboard and mouse, I didn't use the most expensive parts to compare but we have no idea what parts are being used in this build.

For the same amount you could get much better parts.

Horses for courses but food for thought.
Seems to be decent, but a 1080TI paired with an FHD monitor is a bit of a waste.
If you have one of the best GPU's in the market, have a good 4K screen with it.
Edited by: "Lat0r" 18th Mar
Lat0r18 m ago

Seems to be decent, but a 1080TI paired with an FHD monitor is a bit of a …Seems to be decent, but a 1080TI paired with an FHD monitor is a bit of a waste.If you have one of the best GPU's in the market, have a good 4K screen with it.


Only n00bs play games at 60Hz
Westwoodo55 m ago

Use pcpartpicker and you can build it for a lot cheaper, without a …Use pcpartpicker and you can build it for a lot cheaper, without a motherboard (don't ask) and no monitor it's around £1415 leaving £470 for a monitor, motherboard, keyboard and mouse, I didn't use the most expensive parts to compare but we have no idea what parts are being used in this build.For the same amount you could get much better parts.Horses for courses but food for thought.


Goodluck finding a 1080 ti for an affordable price.
ritchiedrama35 m ago

Goodluck finding a 1080 ti for an affordable price.



As you keep saying, I just told you I priced a system up with in stock items and it's much cheaper.

Either give your reason or stop being salty.
Westwoodo1 h, 6 m ago

As you keep saying, I just told you I priced a system up with in stock …As you keep saying, I just told you I priced a system up with in stock items and it's much cheaper.Either give your reason or stop being salty.


Show me where a 1080 ti is in stock then. Go on.
Every single PC deal is filled with “you can build it for cheaper” comments. Yeah I’m sure you can but some people don’t want to go through the hassle of that. Besides, if you see a deal with a 1080 or 1080ti, please link to a retailer selling the card before going on partpicker and showing us your wonderful magical savings.
iKayZee4 m ago

Every single PC deal is filled with “you can build it for cheaper” com …Every single PC deal is filled with “you can build it for cheaper” comments. Yeah I’m sure you can but some people don’t want to go through the hassle of that. Besides, if you see a deal with a 1080 or 1080ti, please link to a retailer selling the card before going on partpicker and showing us your wonderful magical savings.



See above comment.

Both sites have them readily available.

Not cheap but that's not the debate.
Westwoodo50 m ago

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_4?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=1080ti&sprefix=1080,aps,162&crid=1FKUOH433QL2RTake your pick I could get one delivered tuesday by 1pm.Overpriced yes but in stock from a reputable site.https://www.scan.co.uk/shop/computer-hardware/gpu-nvidia/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1080-ti-graphics-cardsSeveral in stock.Seriously what is your issue?


Um.. those are ALL over priced, what is YOUR issue? lol.
ritchiedrama17 m ago

Um.. those are ALL over priced, what is YOUR issue? lol.


Yeah they are overpriced but his point was it’s cheaper to buy all the parts and build yourself. No need to be so hostile my friend.
Heat though! Checked on pcpartpicker and it’s around £1800 and that’s without OS,monitor, keyboard and mouse. Plus add that building your own can either be an absolute nightmare (not always I know). Seems a good deal to me
Are these the systems built by overclockers.co.uk and sold thru Game shops ?
Edited by: "copystuff" 19th Mar
As Already pointed out. This build is a mish mash of unsuitable parts. The board, tho we know it is likely a Z370 board will be the cheapest (not a BIG gripe).
The i7 doesnt go with 2133 ram (limits it at higher refresh rate gaming;even 7 and 8 series i3's are rated for 2400 ram so thats 2016 sylake parts shedding) The 1080 t.i. doesnt go with a 1080p cheap monitor of unknown refresh rate (limits the whole system in res AND Hz) The monitor is likely a £90 TN panel.
The SSD is either a sandisk plus (not bad), a WD green (~) or an A400 kingston (wouldnt touch it)
Guess which is cheapest? It could be even older tech, esp looking at the ram.
Power supply; REALLY CONCERNING with this level investment for parts. (i7, 1080t.i. z370)
I have NEVER come across a tier 2 or better 700 watt psu. It is likely an aerocool integrator (dreadful).possibly an evga b1 or a thermaltake TR2, none of which are reliable enough to risk those parts.

So, could we build it cheaper? For sure.
We leave out all the unsuitable crap and pay a pro £75 to assemble something that works as a whole.
This is a clearout of basement junk with an i7 and high end card thrown in..
Its a BAD idea.
Pushing 2K? I could walk in any indi pc shop and get a better deal built with a monitor thrown in.
Some of you commenters keep banging on about price comparing without realising that a heavy gaming pc built with a POS power supply is as risky as a touting drunk cab driver.
Strangely, the sort of people who buy these 'bargains' never come back 40 months down the line and admit it ran no better than an £800 system or that it caught fire while they were at work and burnt the house down.

'unknown brand'.



'$24'



dslreports.com/for…PSU

2014.

ETC.
Paying £1900 for this car boot sale is a really bad idea.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
joe_shmoe1 h, 1 m ago

As Already pointed out. This build is a mish mash of unsuitable parts. The …As Already pointed out. This build is a mish mash of unsuitable parts. The board, tho we know it is likely a Z370 board will be the cheapest (not a BIG gripe).The i7 doesnt go with 2133 ram (limits it at higher refresh rate gaming;even 7 and 8 series i3's are rated for 2400 ram so thats 2016 sylake parts shedding) The 1080 t.i. doesnt go with a 1080p cheap monitor of unknown refresh rate (limits the whole system in res AND Hz) The monitor is likely a £90 TN panel.The SSD is either a sandisk plus (not bad), a WD green (~) or an A400 kingston (wouldnt touch it)Guess which is cheapest? It could be even older tech, esp looking at the ram. Power supply; REALLY CONCERNING with this level investment for parts. (i7, 1080t.i. z370)I have NEVER come across a tier 2 or better 700 watt psu. It is likely an aerocool integrator (dreadful).possibly an evga b1 or a thermaltake TR2, none of which are reliable enough to risk those parts.So, could we build it cheaper? For sure. We leave out all the unsuitable crap and pay a pro £75 to assemble something that works as a whole. This is a clearout of basement junk with an i7 and high end card thrown in..Its a BAD idea.Pushing 2K? I could walk in any indi pc shop and get a better deal built with a monitor thrown in. Some of you commenters keep banging on about price comparing without realising that a heavy gaming pc built with a POS power supply is as risky as a touting drunk cab driver.


Yep.

People moan about the 'build your own' crowd, but I don't see how any other method makes sense. We game on PCs because we specifically want the maximum quality experience. If we weren't bothered about that, then we'd game on consoles.

The problem with pre-builts is that you can never trust a retailer to provide a system that's really capable of delivering that quality experience. There's too frequent a tendency for retailers to assemble systems that have great headline specs, but which fall down completely on the underlying parts. The monitor in this system is the perfect example of that.

The only way to get a system that's fully up to the standards you want is to pick your own parts, and build your own rig.
dxx15 m ago

Yep. People moan about the 'build your own' crowd, but I don't see how any …Yep. People moan about the 'build your own' crowd, but I don't see how any other method makes sense. We game on PCs because we specifically want the maximum quality experience. If we weren't bothered about that, then we'd game on consoles.The problem with pre-builts is that you can never trust a retailer to provide a system that's really capable of delivering that quality experience. There's too frequent a tendency for retailers to assemble systems that have great headline specs, but which fall down completely on the underlying parts. The monitor in this system is the perfect example of that. The only way to get a system that's fully up to the standards you want is to pick your own parts, and build your own rig.



Strangely, the sort of people who buy these 'bargains' never come back 40 months down the line and admit it ran no better than an £800 system or that it caught fire while they were at work and burnt the house down.
33467225.jpg
'unknown brand'.


33467225.jpg
'$24'



dslreports.com/for…PSU

2014.

ETC.
Paying £1900 for this car boot sale ensemble is a really bad idea.
These are extreme examples, but a cheap psu may / may not destroy everything in the case if and when it fails.Its just a dice roll.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
If you're thinking of getting this - check the PSU, and buy a 2K/4K monitor. This montior would still be good as a secondary.

RAM can always be overclocked at a later date, but imo stuff like this is too critical considering the target demographic. This is ideally aimed at a parent buying for her 8 year old, or an ex console player (at least I would hope?).

The only concern is the PSU like people said. Even though wattage of the PSU is PLENTY high enough just check the brand/rating and report back. I'm sure somebody here will help you, but it could be a budget PSU.

It's a good spec for the price though, worthy of a post at least.
joe_shmoe41 m ago

Strangely, the sort of people who buy these 'bargains' never come back 40 …Strangely, the sort of people who buy these 'bargains' never come back 40 months down the line and admit it ran no better than an £800 system or that it caught fire while they were at work and burnt the house down.[Image] 'unknown brand'.[Image] '$24'dslreports.com/for…PSU2014. ETC. Paying £1900 for this car boot sale ensemble is a really bad idea.These are extreme examples, but a cheap psu may / may not destroy everything in the case if and when it fails.Its just a dice roll.


Lmao 10/10. Gotta love budget PSUs.

I honestly struggle to believe stuff like this though because of YouTube. Anyone could just set their PSU on fire, chainsaw it up abit, then post it on a social outlet for views. Even if it was a thermaltech-whatever PSU this would never happen. It would more than likely just stop working and need replacing, trip the motherboard, or the house circuit breakers. We have better houses and wiring than America though, so who knows. It's great content for the lols either way!
Edited by: "LeftResponse" 19th Mar
That isnt the case unfortunately. Even brands like Corsair have been caught out advertising 'Component Safe' PSU's, only for them to destroy pc's. (CX430/500/600).
Corsair used to have an advert about max loading psu's; its since disapeared because the capacitors in the cx line were too cheap and failed quick above 30 C. (they got caught pants down)
The only safe power supply (statistically) for anything with a gpu in it is a

TIER 2 or higher

unit, I will let you google that because I know which is the best vfm and where the price starts.(Trust me, its not £39,not with a graphics card)
These better units generally have over volt, over current, over temp.short circuit,under volt, surge and other protection in them,meaning if and when they die you just swap it out.I have been doin this for near 2 decades and learnt by failures..
A POS power supply I wouldnt buy for a surfing rig.Plenty good small ones.
(
alza.co.uk/sea…BwE
) -thats tier 3 minimum with superb longevity or my buT is a kipper-

Oh, I am a qualified sparky. When those coils and transistors start to melt the MCB's on your mainboard wont trip until 32 amps. (ringmain) The plug fuse will handle whatever is in it (5-13 amps) If you have a Residual Current Device on the consumer unit (where those trips are) it wont trip until live 230 v starts leaking to earth,which could be ages. 5 amps is 1200 watts, about the same as the small ring on your oven hob.Pile up some plastic trays and ceramic plates on that,big heap_ and see if it starts a fire ? A cheap psu can turn into a disaster,
or even tragedy. Dont chance it, I've seen em go bang.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
dxx4 h, 51 m ago

Yep. People moan about the 'build your own' crowd, but I don't see how any …Yep. People moan about the 'build your own' crowd, but I don't see how any other method makes sense. We game on PCs because we specifically want the maximum quality experience. If we weren't bothered about that, then we'd game on consoles.The problem with pre-builts is that you can never trust a retailer to provide a system that's really capable of delivering that quality experience. There's too frequent a tendency for retailers to assemble systems that have great headline specs, but which fall down completely on the underlying parts. The monitor in this system is the perfect example of that. The only way to get a system that's fully up to the standards you want is to pick your own parts, and build your own rig.



There is a middle ground where you can use a firm that builds custom PCs such as PC Specialist, Chillblast, etc. where you can choose the make and model of most components. Apart from not having to faff about with learning how to build it yourself you'll also get several years support if things go wrong (especially useful if you can't identify which component is causing the issue). Probably worth it for the extra £50-£100 cost compared to DIY.
pelwl41 m ago

There is a middle ground where you can use a firm that builds custom PCs …There is a middle ground where you can use a firm that builds custom PCs such as PC Specialist, Chillblast, etc. where you can choose the make and model of most components. Apart from not having to faff about with learning how to build it yourself you'll also get several years support if things go wrong (especially useful if you can't identify which component is causing the issue). Probably worth it for the extra £50-£100 cost compared to DIY.


Again, most people are unaware they likely have independent operators in their area who can handle this work but simply never get asked? (Any PC shop where they REPAIR pc internals-even laptops- will have experienced people,likely with a pc mechanics course ( hard not software) that could put it together standing on head smoking a cigar. (I could with no quals in it at all) They dont get involved cos,well,you've seen the price of gpu's. Its not bread and butter and they dont 'stock' those parts. but if they get the markup on £1300 worth plus £100 assembly fee its not going to be an issue if you can slap a bag of sand on the counter as a deposit.Most firms that advertise these services impose strict mark ups for total custom builds,so a back street long term repairer/operator is a better option. .. BUT_ they might not get into overclocking it for you ;#}
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
A
ritchiedrama8 h, 0 m ago

Um.. those are ALL over priced, what is YOUR issue? lol.



Ah trying to defuse when proven wrong. Typical internet
LeftResponse6 h, 3 m ago

If you're thinking of getting this - check the PSU, and buy a 2K/4K …If you're thinking of getting this - check the PSU, and buy a 2K/4K monitor. This montior would still be good as a secondary. RAM can always be overclocked at a later date, but imo stuff like this is too critical considering the target demographic. This is ideally aimed at a parent buying for her 8 year old, or an ex console player (at least I would hope?). The only concern is the PSU like people said. Even though wattage of the PSU is PLENTY high enough just check the brand/rating and report back. I'm sure somebody here will help you, but it could be a budget PSU. It's a good spec for the price though, worthy of a post at least.


Interestingly RAM can NOT always be overclocked at a later date. DDR4 2133 is skylake 2016 era. Generally ram produced now 'minimum' bins at 2400,(possibly even 2666) so there is little to no price difference. (what is sold at 2100 is good enough for 2400 but xmp timings are aimed at 2100 skylake chips?)

uk.pcpartpicker.com/pro…ry/
That ripjaws 4 (2400 cas 15) set in the cheapest slot would go 2133 at cas 14 no problem and likely 2666 at cas 16. same 2ndary and 3tiary timings.(ish- use other ripjw kit timings) so faster generally for o/c ing. as expected from Gskill)
The patriot 2133 ram in slot 4 shows up the problem. Its not profitable.
The 2133 ram in this cheetah pc was likely made 2 year ago. It wont o/c a level to 2400 without hamstringing the cas latency Badly, which on intel platforms results in no better performance. It certainly wont o/c to 2666.
It isnt really suitable for ANY 7 or 8 series intel gaming cpu,its just 'stuff' left on the shelf from 2016.
This whole bundle would be great with an i5 8400 and GTX 1060 for £1200 and forget about the details.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
Do not order this yet since the processor might be wrong. When you add this to basket the processor changes to an i7 7700k. Spoke to customer service they are unsure of which processor it is so we will just have to wait and see.
In that case dont order it at all.
Somebody told the stock system pc what it was but 'Customer Service ' Unsure? Do me a favor !!.
Kaby lake 4 cores will be extremely hampered later in gaming and esp additional tasking (streaming etc_ it IS a gaming rig,supposedly) BUT to drop to the kaby lake quad i7 requires a drop to non 6 core supporting motherboards.
Price wise , the 7700K is TOAST. And so are the chipsets. So its ALL old junk?
Fierce PC got stuffed by Intel;huge stock of i7's to shift- doesnt mean you should pay 2 faffing large for a 60 hz gaming rig.
The more I hear the more I say 'AVOID'. This 'deal' smells dodgier by the minute.
If those turn out to be 2016 bios updated H110 motherboards (worth about £45) that would explain the 2133 ram conundrum and anybody who buys one will want to actually burn something down.
AVOID.
AVOID.
AVOID.
REALLY LOOKING LIKE A CONFIDENCE SCAM NOW.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
Think those mobos might be Gigabyte Z370 Hd3. Don't take my word for it.
mosesxd29 m ago

Think those mobos might be Gigabyte Z370 Hd3. Don't take my word for it.


What, running DDR4 2133 and probable 7700'K's? Doesnt look likely.
More likely a confidence scam using old H110 boards.
Edited by: "joe_shmoe" 19th Mar
joe_shmoe10 h, 20 m ago

Interestingly RAM can NOT always be overclocked at a later date. DDR4 2133 …Interestingly RAM can NOT always be overclocked at a later date. DDR4 2133 is skylake 2016 era. Generally ram produced now 'minimum' bins at 2400,(possibly even 2666) so there is little to no price difference. (what is sold at 2100 is good enough for 2400 but xmp timings are aimed at 2100 skylake chips?) https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/products/memory/#s=402133,402400&sort=price&Z=8192002That ripjaws 4 (2400 cas 15) set in the cheapest slot would go 2133 at cas 14 no problem and likely 2666 at cas 16. same 2ndary and 3tiary timings.(ish- use other ripjw kit timings) so faster generally for o/c ing. as expected from Gskill)The patriot 2133 ram in slot 4 shows up the problem. Its not profitable.The 2133 ram in this cheetah pc was likely made 2 year ago. It wont o/c a level to 2400 without hamstringing the cas latency Badly, which on intel platforms results in no better performance. It certainly wont o/c to 2666.It isnt really suitable for ANY 7 or 8 series intel gaming cpu,its just 'stuff' left on the shelf from 2016.This whole bundle would be great with an i5 8400 and GTX 1060 for £1200 and forget about the details.



Just bare in mind there are many 2133MHz RAM sticks out there, so neither of us can really categorically say one way or another if it can be overclocked. As for the OC'ing RAM in general, strangely I haven't actually come across a stick that I couldn't overclock, even if its minimal. Based on my own past experiences, if anything was to stop the Overclock in prebuilts it's more likely be the motherboard as the limiting factor over the RAM.

Regardless, my point wasn't whether RAM should/shouldn't be overclocked. If you have the knowledge of PC building (and parts) you are less likely to consider a build of this nature, and wouldn't buy any of these parts together. I mean we agree on that anyway, of course you wouldn't. You would buy overclocking motherboards, with K CPU, adequate cooling etc etc.

Although I do appreciate the depth of the reply with the RAM links, I was avoiding tearing this PC to shreds (despite how easily it can be done). I merely mentioned the RAM overclock as a throwaway comment relating to a possibility (just like you stating you can't OC it), but the truth is, whether we can or we can't you're nailing the overclocking scene. Ironically the basis of my entire post was to say I believe this ISN'T for the overclocking scene at all. It's a different target demographic.

GAME arn't exactly known for their PC building expertise. Checking the PSU is a no-brainer for most, for others maybe not so much. If the PSU is up to scratch, it's not a bad deal at all based on current prices. You obviously still need the 4K/1440p monitor for the best experience though.
Edited by: "LeftResponse" 19th Mar
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