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FIIDO D1 Folding Electric Moped Bike 10.4Ah Battery £348 @ Geekbuying
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FIIDO D1 Folding Electric Moped Bike 10.4Ah Battery £348 @ Geekbuying

38
Posted 10th Dec 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

This FIIDO D1 Folding Electric Bike have 10.4Ah Lithium Battery which is very good for Electric Moped Bike. its run 40-55KM range with full charge and speed 25km/h, not bad actually.

Shipped from EU warehouse
- Black Color

Found this video helpful
youtube.com/wat…_bg


Highlights
The Fiido D1 features a 52-tooth large chain and a 12-tooth flywheel for a comfortable ride and adapt to different road conditions. This car has a built-in large-capacity battery design, the body is simple, and the lines are beautiful, and equipped with a USB phone holder, the body can be folded in half.

250W Motor, 25km/h Max Speed
250W motor can offer 25km/h max speed and 30 degree steep slopes. Electric motorcycle range up to 40-55km. Using brushless and toothed motor, the power consumption is lower, the endurance is 20% stronger than the normal brushless and toothless motor, and the starting torque is larger.

Max Load 120kg
The body is made of high-strength aluminum alloy, light, no rust. Lightweight and tough aluminum alloy frame has 120kg payload.
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Top comments
deleted238549210/12/2019 15:26

if you used it ... perfectly legal to use the other modes though. I mean I …if you used it ... perfectly legal to use the other modes though. I mean I have a 1000W off-road bike that can do 35mph easily, it's still legal for me to pedal it on the road.


No it’s not.
EXZAMS10/12/2019 15:21

can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal


Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat an eyelid if they spotted you on this bike.
It doesn't even look like an electric bike, it has pedals plus most normal height adults would look like a right spanner riding it so you'll more than likely get pitied.
can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal
38 Comments
Not sure if this is a deal for a bike, moped or even a "car" !
can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal
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deleted2385492
EXZAMS10/12/2019 15:21

can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal


if you used it ... perfectly legal to use the other modes though. I mean I have a 1000W off-road bike that can do 35mph easily, it's still legal for me to pedal it on the road.
deleted238549210/12/2019 15:26

if you used it ... perfectly legal to use the other modes though. I mean I …if you used it ... perfectly legal to use the other modes though. I mean I have a 1000W off-road bike that can do 35mph easily, it's still legal for me to pedal it on the road.


No it’s not.
Avatar
deleted2385492
meanmoose10/12/2019 15:27

No it’s not.


it's not ? oh damn... so is me riding my 1000W off-road bike illegal ? even if im just peddling it with no motor turned on ?
Edited by: "deleted2385492" 10th Dec 2019
deleted238549210/12/2019 15:30

it's not ? oh damn... so is me riding my 1000W off-road bike illegal ? …it's not ? oh damn... so is me riding my 1000W off-road bike illegal ? even if im just peddling it with no motor turned on ?


Yeap. You can remove the motor and it would be fine. The law is about the presence of the vehicle on the road, not how you use it.
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deleted2385492
meanmoose10/12/2019 15:32

Yeap. You can remove the motor and it would be fine. The law is about the …Yeap. You can remove the motor and it would be fine. The law is about the presence of the vehicle on the road, not how you use it.


yikes. thanks man never knew. I thought it was fine as long as I didn't use the motor
i wish everything was in mph as is all our road signs and my speedometer on all my bikes
Liking this and the price also.... 120KG sounds good too with twin disk brakes

maxmix
EXZAMS10/12/2019 15:21

can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal


Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat an eyelid if they spotted you on this bike.
It doesn't even look like an electric bike, it has pedals plus most normal height adults would look like a right spanner riding it so you'll more than likely get pitied.
paulandpam10/12/2019 15:49

Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat …Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat an eyelid if they spotted you on this bike.It doesn't even look like an electric bike, it has pedals plus most normal height adults would look like a right spanner riding it so you'll more than likely get pitied.


For once an escooter with a seat and pedals that actually work Great price also....
The D2 looks interesting also !

youtube.com/wat…sjk


maxmix
Not really, I am 6'1 and fit fine on mine.
deleted238549210/12/2019 15:35

yikes. thanks man never knew. I thought it was fine as long as I didn't …yikes. thanks man never knew. I thought it was fine as long as I didn't use the motor


then you break the law many times! No problem you didn't know
PaulandPam10/12/2019 15:49

Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat …Street legal or not I honestly don't think for a minute Mr plod would bat an eyelid if they spotted you on this bike.It doesn't even look like an electric bike, it has pedals plus most normal height adults would look like a right spanner riding it so you'll more than likely get pitied.


yes. i don't think it will be problem in anywhere
Oh, tempted. Was waiting for a the M365 Pro scooter to come down but I like the idea of a seat and pedals. See that there is a d2 out too. Wonder what the upgrades are?
I think you can use this !...almost like the specs are made to fit

"The UK legislation was harmonised with EU law EN15194 in April 2015, which means that it could change as Brexit takes effect. But for now it’s pretty clear in defining what can – and what cannot – be called an ebike.

Your steed is an “electrically assisted pedal cycle” (or EAPC, or ebike, or Pedelec) if: the bike has pedals that propel it; the electric motor won’t assist you when you’re travelling more than 25 km/h (15.5mph); and the power doesn’t exceed 250 watts.


Read more at cyclingweekly.com/new…973"
Edited by: "Jaspr" 10th Dec 2019
Jaspr10/12/2019 16:26

I think you can use this !...almost like the specs are made to fit "The …I think you can use this !...almost like the specs are made to fit "The UK legislation was harmonised with EU law EN15194 in April 2015, which means that it could change as Brexit takes effect. But for now it’s pretty clear in defining what can – and what cannot – be called an ebike.Your steed is an “electrically assisted pedal cycle” (or EAPC, or ebike, or Pedelec) if: the bike has pedals that propel it; the electric motor won’t assist you when you’re travelling more than 25 km/h (15.5mph); and the power doesn’t exceed 250 watts.Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/product-news/electric-bikes-uk-law-234973#gYVefymQGweKquS8.99"


The first non-armchair lawyer post here.
Jaspr10/12/2019 16:26

I think you can use this !...almost like the specs are made to fit "The …I think you can use this !...almost like the specs are made to fit "The UK legislation was harmonised with EU law EN15194 in April 2015, which means that it could change as Brexit takes effect. But for now it’s pretty clear in defining what can – and what cannot – be called an ebike.Your steed is an “electrically assisted pedal cycle” (or EAPC, or ebike, or Pedelec) if: the bike has pedals that propel it; the electric motor won’t assist you when you’re travelling more than 25 km/h (15.5mph); and the power doesn’t exceed 250 watts.Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/product-news/electric-bikes-uk-law-234973#gYVefymQGweKquS8.99"


This isn't road legal as it is, the harmonisation with EU law means you can no longer have a throttle on a new bike, the motor must only assist while you are pedalling, on the plus side I think it increased the max power for a non-tandem in the UK from 200 to 250w.

If this has a pedal assistance mode with a cadence sensor, then it might be as simple as unplugging the throttle, if not then you would need to fit a sensor and possibly replace the controller, providing it complies in all other respects. I've seem quite cheap controllers on ebay.

UK Ebike rules are here:- gov.uk/ele…les
Edited by: "melted" 10th Dec 2019
Alot of online reviews stating pedal assist only works till 15km/h. It should be 25km/h but it can't reach that in that mode.
What would the penalty be ? My wife for instance has no driving licence to be endorsed so it’s just a fine a guess.
Ordered, cheers
sew10910/12/2019 19:50

What would the penalty be ? My wife for instance has no driving licence to …What would the penalty be ? My wife for instance has no driving licence to be endorsed so it’s just a fine a guess.


Most likely to be charged with operating a vehicle without a license.
melted10/12/2019 17:17

This isn't road legal as it is, the harmonisation with EU law means you …This isn't road legal as it is, the harmonisation with EU law means you can no longer have a throttle on a new bike, the motor must only assist while you are pedalling, on the plus side I think it increased the max power for a non-tandem in the UK from 200 to 250w.If this has a pedal assistance mode with a cadence sensor, then it might be as simple as unplugging the throttle, if not then you would need to fit a sensor and possibly replace the controller, providing it complies in all other respects. I've seem quite cheap controllers on ebay.UK Ebike rules are here:- https://www.gov.uk/electric-bike-rules


Strange I have seen tons of ebikes in London and not a single plate, and I’m sure 90% of them can go without pedalling, even the Bosch one didn’t have a plate on them. Clearly they’re not enforcing this law.

That doesn’t mean they can catch and fine you one day =p.
I don't think it's a question of whether you're likely to get stopped and/or fined. Given the British police I think that's pretty unlikely for most people.

Until something goes wrong.

When you run into a pedestrian or collide with a car or other cyclist, for example, that's when you'd get the book thrown at you and, given you were doing something illegal at the time, you'd have no insurance to cover what could be a pretty big claim.

It's also worth questioning the safety of such small wheels, given the terrible state of our roads. One of those little fellows hits a pothole and you're going over the handlebars, no doubt.
EXZAMS10/12/2019 15:21

can be ridden without peddle assist so will not be street legal



Stop lying to people, its perfectly legal.
foolsgold9910/12/2019 16:10

Oh, tempted. Was waiting for a the M365 Pro scooter to come down but I …Oh, tempted. Was waiting for a the M365 Pro scooter to come down but I like the idea of a seat and pedals. See that there is a d2 out too. Wonder what the upgrades are?


the difference between d1 and d2 is 14 inch wheel vs 16 inch wheel
JefferyinUK11/12/2019 08:08

the difference between d1 and d2 is 14 inch wheel vs 16 inch wheel


Yeah, cheers also rear suspension (which I wouldn’t use). I like the shape of the D1 and the black colour better. This D1 also has a higher battery capacity and longer range so went with it.

Big advantage over the scooter is that I can sit down and also slight legal workaround 🏼
My girlfriend has a super duper electric mountain bike that does over 30mph with no pedal assist - Throttle only, but she pretends to pedal so it all looks legal.
ZiggySTW10/12/2019 23:58

Strange I have seen tons of ebikes in London and not a single plate, and …Strange I have seen tons of ebikes in London and not a single plate, and I’m sure 90% of them can go without pedalling, even the Bosch one didn’t have a plate on them. Clearly they’re not enforcing this law.That doesn’t mean they can catch and fine you one day =p.




Those that were with manufactured prior to the changes in E-bike regulations which I think was in 2015, are still perfectly legal on the road in the UK, providing the throttle wasn't added after the change in regulations.
Edited by: "melted" 11th Dec 2019
By Law it has to be insured and ou would not get insurance on it. It is classed as a moped and does not matter if you pedal it or not.
Aj_says10/12/2019 17:52

Alot of online reviews stating pedal assist only works till 15km/h. It …Alot of online reviews stating pedal assist only works till 15km/h. It should be 25km/h but it can't reach that in that mode.


If it uses an off the shelf e-bike controller with pedal assist, rather than a custom one, then if you are really lucky it just might also have an input for assist power level that has been hardwired at low, which would permit installing an assist level control on the handlebars (not that it would be labelled even if it did!).

The controller fitted on my father's old e-bike uses magnets and a hall sensor to detect the crank is being turned, and the amount of assist (low medium or high) is selected from a control on the handlebars, it also has an empty socket for a throttle input and another with a shunt which I have read you unplug if you wish to disable the speed limiter.

I suppose another option to replacing the controller if it can't be sorted, would be to fit a cadence (hall) sensor and power assist control and program a cheap microcontroller (eg with arduino ) to operate the throttle based on their inputs.
Edited by: "melted" 11th Dec 2019
If you're a londoner I'd reccomend against.

I cycle an hour a day all over the city, sometimes 2 hours, and I've encountered some awful bits of road. Some monster potholes.
Sometimes you're just behind traffic, so you can't see the pothole coming, so you rely on your bike to take it.

I suspect something with tiny wheels like this and a low center of gravity will do badly in such a scenario. And it will happen, if you plan on taking this about town.
I find the law very vague and confusing which may be the situation for the police. While it says you cannot propel the vehicle with throttle alone what if your e-bike cannot work without pedalling but while peddling you can vary the power output up to 250W or 15.5mph by using a throttle? Reading the law that seems legal.

Also many commercial legal e-bikes have the same motors that can be configured to higher output for different countries and sometimes its just a matter of button presses or minor changes to get that higher output mode here in the UK you don't have to go back to the factory to change it so are those bikes illegal as not hardwired for 250W 15.5mph output only? Are such shops selling bikes illegal for the road?

What is the difference of buying a 1000W hub motor kit and using the 250W output mode for road use? If you can buy a big brand 350W/400W motor e-bike configured as 250W from the factory but easily changed at home? Both can be set beyond 250W easily?

I don't get the 250W restriction anyway, 250W can easily get you up to high speeds on the flats but can be too weak up hills. Surely the point of an e-bike is helping you up hills so you arrive at work comfortably making e-bikes more viable. There are lots of safety features that could be integrated into an e-bike electronically cheaply. Like a GPS chip that senses speed and cuts out over 15.5mph and a incline angle type chip that senses you are on a hill and delivers more power. I've done up to 42mph on a conventional bike going down hill and maybe up to 25 or 28mph on flat roads for short periods so riding a conventional bike can go well beyond an e-bike and when I go fast on a normal bike I'm physically working really hard and less aware of what is going on around me. If anything I would of thought 30mph should be a safe limit of assistance for an e-bike.

Just seems the e-bike laws are in an early stage of development and that is one of the reasons the police don't bother with e-bikes.
bonzobanana13/12/2019 11:38

I find the law very vague and confusing which may be the situation for the …I find the law very vague and confusing which may be the situation for the police. While it says you cannot propel the vehicle with throttle alone what if your e-bike cannot work without pedalling but while peddling you can vary the power output up to 250W or 15.5mph by using a throttle? Reading the law that seems legal.Also many commercial legal e-bikes have the same motors that can be configured to higher output for different countries and sometimes its just a matter of button presses or minor changes to get that higher output mode here in the UK you don't have to go back to the factory to change it so are those bikes illegal as not hardwired for 250W 15.5mph output only? Are such shops selling bikes illegal for the road?What is the difference of buying a 1000W hub motor kit and using the 250W output mode for road use? If you can buy a big brand 350W/400W motor e-bike configured as 250W from the factory but easily changed at home? Both can be set beyond 250W easily?I don't get the 250W restriction anyway, 250W can easily get you up to high speeds on the flats but can be too weak up hills. Surely the point of an e-bike is helping you up hills so you arrive at work comfortably making e-bikes more viable. There are lots of safety features that could be integrated into an e-bike electronically cheaply. Like a GPS chip that senses speed and cuts out over 15.5mph and a incline angle type chip that senses you are on a hill and delivers more power. I've done up to 42mph on a conventional bike going down hill and maybe up to 25 or 28mph on flat roads for short periods so riding a conventional bike can go well beyond an e-bike and when I go fast on a normal bike I'm physically working really hard and less aware of what is going on around me. If anything I would of thought 30mph should be a safe limit of assistance for an e-bike.Just seems the e-bike laws are in an early stage of development and that is one of the reasons the police don't bother with e-bikes.


ditto the awareness point, im far more conscious on an ebike
Arrives tomorrow... beauty 👌🏼
bonzobanana13/12/2019 11:38

I find the law very vague and confusing which may be the situation for the …I find the law very vague and confusing which may be the situation for the police. While it says you cannot propel the vehicle with throttle alone what if your e-bike cannot work without pedalling but while peddling you can vary the power output up to 250W or 15.5mph by using a throttle? Reading the law that seems legal.Also many commercial legal e-bikes have the same motors that can be configured to higher output for different countries and sometimes its just a matter of button presses or minor changes to get that higher output mode here in the UK you don't have to go back to the factory to change it so are those bikes illegal as not hardwired for 250W 15.5mph output only? Are such shops selling bikes illegal for the road?What is the difference of buying a 1000W hub motor kit and using the 250W output mode for road use? If you can buy a big brand 350W/400W motor e-bike configured as 250W from the factory but easily changed at home? Both can be set beyond 250W easily?I don't get the 250W restriction anyway, 250W can easily get you up to high speeds on the flats but can be too weak up hills. Surely the point of an e-bike is helping you up hills so you arrive at work comfortably making e-bikes more viable. There are lots of safety features that could be integrated into an e-bike electronically cheaply. Like a GPS chip that senses speed and cuts out over 15.5mph and a incline angle type chip that senses you are on a hill and delivers more power. I've done up to 42mph on a conventional bike going down hill and maybe up to 25 or 28mph on flat roads for short periods so riding a conventional bike can go well beyond an e-bike and when I go fast on a normal bike I'm physically working really hard and less aware of what is going on around me. If anything I would of thought 30mph should be a safe limit of assistance for an e-bike.Just seems the e-bike laws are in an early stage of development and that is one of the reasons the police don't bother with e-bikes.


The law seems pretty clear to me regarding a throttle, you can not have a conventional throttle like you might find on a moped to make it go without pedalling, the motor must instead assist pedalling.

You can have a device to adjust the power level of the motor assistance when you pedal, as there's nothing in the law to prohibit that, and many (probably most) E-bikes have a simple hall sensor that is used solely to detect that the pedals are being turned and the motor power level is selected with a control on the handlebars, like my father's, but it is usually selection buttons to save the rider from having to continuously hold, twist or press a control.

The law was changed to bring it in line with the rest of the EU, so that manufacturers would produce e-bikes that could be sold and used across the whole EU, not for any safety reason.

That change was also an impediment to people who buy e-bikes so they can continue to cycle despite medical conditions, as it prevents them riding home without pedalling when they get short of breath, unless they find a secondhand e-bike that had a throttle fitted before the revision in the the UK law.

I looked into the possibility to use more powerful e-bike conversion kits on the road and limiting the output to 250 watts, but my reading of the law is that it would most definitely not be road legal.

If limiting high power output motors was legal, it would be very easy to flout the law, which I would have done, by constructing a controller that would perform perfectly legally, except while it detects a bluetooth signal from your phone, or after a Morse code tapped out on the controls, so that even if the police stopped you and tested the bike, they would not be able to prove you were using it, or that it was even capable of being used on the road in a non-lawful higher power mode.

As for the 15.5mph speed limit, I think that originates from the laws that covered the lowest class of mopeds when the law originally was introduced, which were intended for younger riders first moped.

I agree 15.5mph is quite slow for a conventional road/racing bicycle, I'm horrendously unfit, yet I comfortably cruse above 20mph on the flat without effort. I have gone out with my father on his e-bike, it's got small wheels and low gearing and quite heavy so he couldn't exceed the 25kph limit, which mean't I was constantly looking back and coasting waiting for him to catch up, but he'd give me a good run for my money up the hills, especially as if I'd been on my own, I would have picked up speed before the hill.

We actually had E-bikes laws since about 1983, when Clair Sinclive introduced his C5, which had a then legal throttle, and pedals which I gather aren't very practical.
Edited by: "melted" 15th Dec 2019
melted15/12/2019 13:25

The law seems pretty clear to me regarding a throttle, you can not have a …The law seems pretty clear to me regarding a throttle, you can not have a conventional throttle like you might find on a moped to make it go without pedalling, the motor must instead assist pedalling. You can have a device to adjust the power level of the motor assistance when you pedal, as there's nothing in the law to prohibit that, and many (probably most) E-bikes have a simple hall sensor that is used solely to detect that the pedals are being turned and the motor power level is selected with a control on the handlebars, like my father's, but it is usually selection buttons to save the rider from having to continuously hold, twist or press a control.The law was changed to bring it in line with the rest of the EU, so that manufacturers would produce e-bikes that could be sold and used across the whole EU, not for any safety reason. That change was also an impediment to people who buy e-bikes so they can continue to cycle despite medical conditions, as it prevents them riding home without pedalling when they get short of breath, unless they find a secondhand e-bike that had a throttle fitted before the revision in the the UK law.I looked into the possibility to use more powerful e-bike conversion kits on the road and limiting the output to 250 watts, but my reading of the law is that it would most definitely not be road legal. If limiting high power output motors was legal, it would be very easy to flout the law, which I would have done, by constructing a controller that would perform perfectly legally, except while it detects a bluetooth signal from your phone, or after a Morse code tapped out on the controls, so that even if the police stopped you and tested the bike, they would not be able to prove you were using it, or that it was even capable of being used on the road in a non-lawful higher power mode. As for the 15.5mph speed limit, I think that originates from the laws that covered the lowest class of mopeds when the law originally was introduced, which were intended for younger riders first moped.I agree 15.5mph is quite slow for a conventional road/racing bicycle, I'm horrendously unfit, yet I comfortably cruse above 20mph on the flat without effort. I have gone out with my father on his e-bike, it's got small wheels and low gearing and quite heavy so he couldn't exceed the 25kph limit, which mean't I was constantly looking back and coasting waiting for him to catch up, but he'd give me a good run for my money up the hills, especially as if I'd been on my own, I would have picked up speed before the hill. We actually had E-bikes laws since about 1983, when Clair Sinclive introduced his C5, which had a then legal throttle, and pedals which I gather aren't very practical.


I've seen many posts where people seem to think any throttle is illegal unless it was registered before 2016 or whenever it was and I couldn't get my head around that looking at the summary of the law.

You also get commercial companies clearly selling 1000W hub motors restricted to 250W as legal such as this one.

ezebike.co.uk/

Lastly any hub motor will be more powerful if you give it more voltage and current. So surely the legal aspect is in the controller more than anything and that is the part that dictates power. This seems to be the solution with huge bike brands too with the motors themselves happy to use more current but restricted by the electronics not the motor and pushing boundaries too with peak power output above 250W.

If you followed your logic or interpretation of the law ever single hub motor e-bike would be illegal as all hub motors are capable of going well beyond 250W as far as I understand as they are all fairly simple motors that have no ability to restrict power themselves.

I'm pretty sure I've seen comments on e-bike forums that for direct drive hub motors people who bought 1500W or 2000W hub motors found that the hub motor was identical to the 250-1000W model and only the controller changed that could handle higher current.

It does seem to be the legal aspect of e-bikes is centred around the controller not the motor and if it isn't pretty much every e-bike is illegal.

It also seems like a huge percentage of e-bike owners whether they are home made kits or £7,000 high end bikes are de-restricting their bikes and still using them on the road.
Great bike. It’s an absolute cracker and great having a seat and pedals over a M365. Merry Christmas to me
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