Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Aqua One Horizon Aquarium and Cabinet 130 Litre £210 @ Pets at Home
184° Expired

Aqua One Horizon Aquarium and Cabinet 130 Litre £210 @ Pets at Home

£210£30030%Pets at Home Deals
26
Posted 27th Dec 2019

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

130l fish tank with cabinet, light and filter.
A very good beginner set up as everything ready to go.
Free shipping aswell
Community Updates
If you click through or buy, retailers may pay hotukdeals some money, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.

Groups

Top comments
Murgatr0yd27/12/2019 12:55

Thankfully Pets at Home no longer allow people to buy a tank and fish on …Thankfully Pets at Home no longer allow people to buy a tank and fish on the same day, although idiots who know better will still try and fully stock it with fish long before a proper cycle has been established.


Exactly, it needs to take at least 2 weeks fully running until its gonna be ready for the fishes. I've spend years in this hobby so if any of readers have some questions, I'm more then happy to help
sagem27/12/2019 13:27

I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping …I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?


Really? The whole point in cycling a tank is to grow the bacteria for dealing with the ammonia from your livestock. Set the tank up in a suitable level location not in direct sunlight, add washed gravel and any other landscaping, if you plan on planting the tank add a suitable substrate below the gravel. Add filter (after rinsing media) and heater. Now add normal tap water and treat with tap water conditioner. When the water is at level turn on the heater and filter and let the tank settle. Adjust your heater temperature to the correct setting and monitor over a few days. You can add chemicals to speed up the tank cycle or you can just add a bit of fish food every few days. The food breaking down will grow the bacteria you require. Test daily to monitor you nitrate, nitrate and ammonia levels. You'll know when the tank is cycled. You can also cycle the tank using a hardy fish but that isn't recommended as you are risking the fish. You won't need lighting until you have livestock on the tank.

There is a ton of info online about setting up cycling an aquarium. Do your research before starting this hobby. I've successfully kept both planted tropical and reef tanks for many years. It is a great and rewarding hobby but you need to research and make sure you have the knowledge and equipment before you rush into things, it's not a goldfish bowl!!
26 Comments
Thankfully Pets at Home no longer allow people to buy a tank and fish on the same day, although idiots who know better will still try and fully stock it with fish long before a proper cycle has been established.
Murgatr0yd27/12/2019 12:55

Thankfully Pets at Home no longer allow people to buy a tank and fish on …Thankfully Pets at Home no longer allow people to buy a tank and fish on the same day, although idiots who know better will still try and fully stock it with fish long before a proper cycle has been established.


Exactly, it needs to take at least 2 weeks fully running until its gonna be ready for the fishes. I've spend years in this hobby so if any of readers have some questions, I'm more then happy to help
I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?
sagem27/12/2019 13:27

I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping …I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?


Really? The whole point in cycling a tank is to grow the bacteria for dealing with the ammonia from your livestock. Set the tank up in a suitable level location not in direct sunlight, add washed gravel and any other landscaping, if you plan on planting the tank add a suitable substrate below the gravel. Add filter (after rinsing media) and heater. Now add normal tap water and treat with tap water conditioner. When the water is at level turn on the heater and filter and let the tank settle. Adjust your heater temperature to the correct setting and monitor over a few days. You can add chemicals to speed up the tank cycle or you can just add a bit of fish food every few days. The food breaking down will grow the bacteria you require. Test daily to monitor you nitrate, nitrate and ammonia levels. You'll know when the tank is cycled. You can also cycle the tank using a hardy fish but that isn't recommended as you are risking the fish. You won't need lighting until you have livestock on the tank.

There is a ton of info online about setting up cycling an aquarium. Do your research before starting this hobby. I've successfully kept both planted tropical and reef tanks for many years. It is a great and rewarding hobby but you need to research and make sure you have the knowledge and equipment before you rush into things, it's not a goldfish bowl!!
sagem27/12/2019 13:27

I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping …I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?


Not sure if serious. Someone's having you on, mate. Plenty of guides online, or YouTube. Make sure you know what you're doing, before buying any living creatures.
Anyone any thoughts on the deal though?
Also worth mentioning that most shops that sell tanks and fish will also test your water FOC. If you stock with fish before a cycle is established, you’ll spend the next few weeks watching the fish die and wondering why you wasted your money.
phatbhoy27/12/2019 14:07

Anyone any thoughts on the deal though?


Good deal. Voted hot.
I bought it, I started with fish a year a go, just with a 60l biorb with a few fish in and I'm hooked, this is my next step, mine being delivered next week
Seems like a good deal to me, especially with the cabinet included, as these sometimes are as expensive as the tank. I have a store 5 mins away, I might Pop up and see if they have it on display. Thanks OP. I've had tanks before with tropical fish, but might go for marine fish, although their harder to maintain, they have a beautiful selection of fish.
As above, this is a good deal. I bought an aqua one tank from pets at home recently and I used the chrome extension honey which auto adds any voucher codes. It ended up using an extra 20% off which has now expired but worth trying it to see if it has anymore codes for anything.
You can speed up the process by using someone elses filter media and take a few litres of their water if you know anyone that is, make sure their system is disease free or ask the store if you can purchase some ceramic media from them to help, and/or live rock if going marine, also invest in a decent protein skimmer ( mesh wheel ) no need for one of those for fresh water though.

I used to run a tropical marine coral and fish system for years and gained a wealth of knowledge if anyone wants some advice just ask.
Cunning-Stunts27/12/2019 17:53

You can speed up the process by using someone elses filter media and take …You can speed up the process by using someone elses filter media and take a few litres of their water if you know anyone that is, make sure their system is disease free or ask the store if you can purchase some ceramic media from them to help, and/or live rock if going marine, also invest in a decent protein skimmer ( mesh wheel ) no need for one of those for fresh water though.I used to run a tropical marine coral and fish system for years and gained a wealth of knowledge if anyone wants some advice just ask.


Taking a few litres of someone’s water won’t do much as the majority of beneficial bacteria is held in the filter media and gravel. But can definitely speed up a cycle by adding someone’s filter media, the dirtier their filter media the better for a new tank 😁
sagem27/12/2019 13:27

I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping …I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?


Surely this is a wind up!?
Nice looking tank, agreed with the cycling, get some plants in there to produce more ammonia to help speed up the process
Thyseus27/12/2019 19:27

Nice looking tank, agreed with the cycling, get some plants in there to …Nice looking tank, agreed with the cycling, get some plants in there to produce more ammonia to help speed up the process


You’d be better placing some fish food in the tank as a source of ammonia, obviously no fish, just drop some flakes in to start producing ammonia 😁 🏻
Been on the lookout for a new tank as i’m looking to replace my 46ltr fluval edge but 130ltr is to big a tank for me. Superb deal tho & heat added.
mmmbacon201627/12/2019 14:20

Seems like a good deal to me, especially with the cabinet included, as …Seems like a good deal to me, especially with the cabinet included, as these sometimes are as expensive as the tank. I have a store 5 mins away, I might Pop up and see if they have it on display. Thanks OP. I've had tanks before with tropical fish, but might go for marine fish, although their harder to maintain, they have a beautiful selection of fish.


This would be quite a small marine tank. You’d need to be cautious regarding stocking and changes in water chemistry, as this will occur far more quickly with smaller volumes of water.
JAMAL27/12/2019 19:26

Surely this is a wind up!?


This is what happens when you get your aquarium advice from the fishmongers.
Well my fish are still going strong!?
Murgatr0yd27/12/2019 20:23

This would be quite a small marine tank. You’d need to be cautious r …This would be quite a small marine tank. You’d need to be cautious regarding stocking and changes in water chemistry, as this will occur far more quickly with smaller volumes of water.


Thanks for the info! What size tank would you recommend?
sagem27/12/2019 22:30

Well my fish are still going strong!?


You mean they are alive....
mmmbacon201627/12/2019 23:40

Thanks for the info! What size tank would you recommend?


I wouldn’t be comfortable going too much below a 4ft/200 litre tank. Ideally you will want a small sump tank (often located underneath your main tank in the cabinet) as this will allow greater surface skimming.
If you wanted to keep with the same manufacturer, the below tank is a reasonable size. It is currently reduced, but not sure if best deal out there.

elmpets.co.uk/aqua-one-horizon-182-aquarium-cabinet-p-11061.html

There are specific marine tank setups from the same manufacturer (Aquareef). There is a 195 litre with smaller dimensions, however I’d be inclined to go towards the 300 or 400 due to the increased swimming space. I believe this rang have an integrated sump in the cabinet.

You can use a smaller tank, depending on how you want to stock it but, on the basis of chemistry changes occurring faster in smaller volumes of water and the cost of marine fishkeeping, I’d suggest going for the largest tank you can accommodate.

As with any live animals, the more research you can do, the better. If you have a specific fish/type of fish in mind, find out what its living requirements are before buying it. Alternatively, you can decide what tank size you can accommodate and research good setups for that size of tank.

Beware of forums, as everyone has different (and not always correct) advice. There are plenty of sites (search practicalfishkeeping - uk site etc.) which have information pages for all different types of fish to help you make up your mind.

If you ensure you don’t buy anything that requires a larger volume of water when fully grown than your tank can provide and you don’t over stock, you won’t run into future issues regarding insufficient tank size.
Edited by: "Murgatr0yd" 28th Dec 2019
Murgatr0yd28/12/2019 17:53

I wouldn’t be comfortable going too much below a 4ft/200 litre tank. I …I wouldn’t be comfortable going too much below a 4ft/200 litre tank. Ideally you will want a small sump tank (often located underneath your main tank in the cabinet) as this will allow greater surface skimming.If you wanted to keep with the same manufacturer, the below tank is a reasonable size. It is currently reduced, but not sure if best deal out there.elmpets.co.uk/aqua-one-horizon-182-aquarium-cabinet-p-11061.htmlThere are specific marine tank setups from the same manufacturer (Aquareef). There is a 195 litre with smaller dimensions, however I’d be inclined to go towards the 300 or 400 due to the increased swimming space. I believe this rang have an integrated sump in the cabinet.You can use a smaller tank, depending on how you want to stock it but, on the basis of chemistry changes occurring faster in smaller volumes of water and the cost of marine fishkeeping, I’d suggest going for the largest tank you can accommodate.As with any live animals, the more research you can do, the better. If you have a specific fish/type of fish in mind, find out what its living requirements are before buying it. Alternatively, you can decide what tank size you can accommodate and research good setups for that size of tank.Beware of forums, as everyone has different (and not always correct) advice. There are plenty of sites (search practicalfishkeeping - uk site etc.) which have information pages for all different types of fish to help you make up your mind.If you ensure you don’t buy anything that requires a larger volume of water when fully grown than your tank can provide and you don’t over stock, you won’t run into future issues regarding insufficient tank size.



Murgatr0yd28/12/2019 17:53

I wouldn’t be comfortable going too much below a 4ft/200 litre tank. I …I wouldn’t be comfortable going too much below a 4ft/200 litre tank. Ideally you will want a small sump tank (often located underneath your main tank in the cabinet) as this will allow greater surface skimming.If you wanted to keep with the same manufacturer, the below tank is a reasonable size. It is currently reduced, but not sure if best deal out there.elmpets.co.uk/aqua-one-horizon-182-aquarium-cabinet-p-11061.htmlThere are specific marine tank setups from the same manufacturer (Aquareef). There is a 195 litre with smaller dimensions, however I’d be inclined to go towards the 300 or 400 due to the increased swimming space. I believe this rang have an integrated sump in the cabinet.You can use a smaller tank, depending on how you want to stock it but, on the basis of chemistry changes occurring faster in smaller volumes of water and the cost of marine fishkeeping, I’d suggest going for the largest tank you can accommodate.As with any live animals, the more research you can do, the better. If you have a specific fish/type of fish in mind, find out what its living requirements are before buying it. Alternatively, you can decide what tank size you can accommodate and research good setups for that size of tank.Beware of forums, as everyone has different (and not always correct) advice. There are plenty of sites (search practicalfishkeeping - uk site etc.) which have information pages for all different types of fish to help you make up your mind.If you ensure you don’t buy anything that requires a larger volume of water when fully grown than your tank can provide and you don’t over stock, you won’t run into future issues regarding insufficient tank size.


Wow, thanks for all your information, much appreciated
sagem27/12/2019 13:27

I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping …I got told to fill a new tank with ice cubes let it thaw and keep topping it up? That way no bacteria in the water and fish can go straight in when it’s melted?


This is insane
Please research cycling an aquarium before buying this
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text