Flavel FCMSB Arundel Black DEFRA Aproved Multifuel Stove £399.99 @ Gas Superstore
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Flavel FCMSB Arundel Black DEFRA Aproved Multifuel Stove £399.99 @ Gas Superstore

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I was wondering what's the cost of rest of thr job? What I need to buy?
and it'll cost you three times that to have it "professionally" installed (mandatory ) but good price, looks nice
a professional fit including new chimney pot and flue liner cost me approx 900 quid 2 yrs ago. a straight swap for another stove or an installation without line should be a fair bit cheaper.
Good price. Our fitting was £450 1.5 years ago. Def worth it.
Who did you get to fit it ? Can you recommend ?
As a 'Professional' the amount of money that I've spent on training, re-occuring fees, insurance, tools, and advertising, plus then labour for a second man, personal risk of getting on the roof with 8 - 12 meters of metal liner, responsibility of putting my name to a job that if wrong I could poison an entire family with Carbon Monoxide or burn their house down, warrants the cost of a £900 - £1000 installation cost including VAT and materials.
Just had a stove fitted for £1100.

Hopefully we can recoup the costs back from the savings in gas
Good looking stove, though its only a 5KW output, so suitable for smaller rooms
its this price everywhere
obviously pimping their own company
japes

and it'll cost you three times that to have it "professionally" installed … and it'll cost you three times that to have it "professionally" installed (mandatory ) but good price, looks nice


It is NOT mandatory to have it professionally installed. You can self install but must submit an application to building control at you local council who will check the install complies with building regs and approve if so. There is a fee which varies (for me is £270) for building control. If you're having an external chimney/flue fitted then a self install can save you a fortune if you buy and install, but be mindful of the dangers working at height, and follow the building regs.
glennhoward007

It is NOT mandatory to have it professionally installed. You can self … It is NOT mandatory to have it professionally installed. You can self install but must submit an application to building control at you local council who will check the install complies with building regs and approve if so. There is a fee which varies (for me is £270) for building control. If you're having an external chimney/flue fitted then a self install can save you a fortune if you buy and install, but be mindful of the dangers working at height, and follow the building regs.



I thought this was a multifuel stove, so assume it connects to gas? so would not be about to self install
glennhoward007

It is NOT mandatory to have it professionally installed. You can self … It is NOT mandatory to have it professionally installed. You can self install but must submit an application to building control at you local council who will check the install complies with building regs and approve if so. There is a fee which varies (for me is £270) for building control. If you're having an external chimney/flue fitted then a self install can save you a fortune if you buy and install, but be mindful of the dangers working at height, and follow the building regs.



Check out this website - stovefittersmanual.co.uk/
A mine of useful information and good prices for parts too!
bojangles

I thought this was a multifuel stove, so assume it connects to gas? so … I thought this was a multifuel stove, so assume it connects to gas? so would not be about to self install



​I think multifuel means coal or wood, I guess having a gas supply in the same unit as naked flames could be rather dangerous.
bojangles

I thought this was a multifuel stove, so assume it connects to gas? so … I thought this was a multifuel stove, so assume it connects to gas? so would not be about to self install



Multifuel = the ability to burn SEPARATELY either Wood based fuel or coal based fuel. (never together)
Bojangles, you scare the hell out of me! oO X)
mrkaroshi

Good looking stove, though its only a 5KW output, so suitable for smaller … Good looking stove, though its only a 5KW output, so suitable for smaller rooms


5kw will cook you in a small room
I dont think you can buy a quality stove for this price.Looks good at first but ask a few questions,can i buy spares and will they be available in the future,will the stove last a few years etc.I paid £1500 for my Esse five years ago and spares are available .Some of these cheap Chinese stoves will not last.Better to get a quality stove in the first place.
dumb question but do these stoves only heat the one room? unlike central heating the whole house.
you can use it to hear water and drive central heating... although obviously this is a much more expensive install... and you would possibly need a more powerful stove
japes

and it'll cost you three times that to have it "professionally" installed … and it'll cost you three times that to have it "professionally" installed (mandatory ) but good price, looks nice


I don't think it's mandatory. HETAS recommend it but there's no law as such. That's what my sweep was telling me just this morning. I find myself looking at a £2000 scaffold bill to get a liner in. He suggested that as long as the chimney was sound, then there was no reason I couldn't fit one myself. Ensure the output pipe doesn't go too far up the flue as otherwse you will get condensation forming lower down. Ensure you use a decent fire sheet to seal up the flue. Sit it on a solid hearth (marble, quarry stone etc) and USE GOOD SEASONED WOOD. This will ensure minimal resins and a good clean burn. If you use rubbish wood, then you may face issues...

I'm not a professional, this is just advice that I have received.
billythefish

5kw will cook you in a small room



what this man said. Don't under-estimate the heat from a wood burner. I've got a 2-up, 2-down property and was advised against a stove in the front room for this reason. It would bake us and we'd have to run it inefficiently to keep the temperature reasonable. The front room is about 2.5m x 2.5m. We have an open fire in there and that is sufficient.

Off the back downstairs room, we have a kitchen / bathroom extension going further back (and up a small level), we also have a staircase going up to the bedrooms. For this reason, a small log burner would be suitable as the heat would dissipate to the extension and the upstairs. Again, it would be a small burner though!

Hope this helps.
5kW is enough for a pretty big room and it can save you money as you can just heat one room and leave the central heating off. I would have it installed professionally though, you might need a new hearth and a chimney liner - expensive job but you run a risk of serious injury or death if it's not working properly. Bear in mind that the whole thing gets hot enough to burn you, so if you have kids you would want to install it in a place where a substantial guard is feasible. You also have to ensure your wood is seasoned or buy kiln dried for immediate use. logs2u.co.uk are good (their heatlogs are excellent mixed with wood).

Best thing I ever bought.
HEAT op (excuse the pun ) agree with the comments about expensive to install, but remember it is your family's lives you are dealing with! I understand that it is now against regulations to have a wood / multi fuel burner without a chimney liner - not an expert but was told by installers when getting quotes for mine.
robertoegg

I don't think it's mandatory. HETAS recommend it but there's no law as … I don't think it's mandatory. HETAS recommend it but there's no law as such. That's what my sweep was telling me just this morning. I find myself looking at a £2000 scaffold bill to get a liner in. He suggested that as long as the chimney was sound, then there was no reason I couldn't fit one myself. Ensure the output pipe doesn't go too far up the flue as otherwse you will get condensation forming lower down. Ensure you use a decent fire sheet to seal up the flue. Sit it on a solid hearth (marble, quarry stone etc) and USE GOOD SEASONED WOOD. This will ensure minimal resins and a good clean burn. If you use rubbish wood, then you may face issues...I'm not a professional, this is just advice that I have received.


£2000 for scaffolding? That seems really expensive> I have just had my 4 bed house completly surrounded with scaffolding for 2 weeks whilst I had a new roof fitted and that only cost £900.
coolcat21

HEAT op (excuse the pun ) agree with the comments about expensive to … HEAT op (excuse the pun ) agree with the comments about expensive to install, but remember it is your family's lives you are dealing with! I understand that it is now against regulations to have a wood / multi fuel burner without a chimney liner - not an expert but was told by installers when getting quotes for mine.



Please don't perpetuate myths. There are no 'regulations' that state you have to have a liner. A simple search online will confirm this. There are reasons you would use a liner but it is not necessary if your existing flue will do the job.
To any woodburning stove owner, how much do you save per month using one of these as apposed to your GCH.
ford652

£2000 for scaffolding? That seems really expensive I have just had my 4 … £2000 for scaffolding? That seems really expensive> I have just had my 4 bed house completly surrounded with scaffolding for 2 weeks whilst I had a new roof fitted and that only cost £900.



might be because mine is for a platform around the chimney stack which has to be built up from behind the property only, due to road closures?
I've been wanting a stove for years. This has just prompted me to contact the local independent stove fitter in my town for a quote.

My (small) living room is 17ft x 11ft, so this should be OK?
Edited by: "illbuythatforadollar" 6th Oct 2015
monitor1

I dont think you can buy a quality stove for this price.Looks good at … I dont think you can buy a quality stove for this price.Looks good at first but ask a few questions,can i buy spares and will they be available in the future,will the stove last a few years etc.I paid £1500 for my Esse five years ago and spares are available .Some of these cheap Chinese stoves will not last.Better to get a quality stove in the first place.



What makes you think this is "one of these cheap Chinese stoves"?

It's British made.

I just hope people don't take comments here as gospel because many are completely misleading.

Flavel is a brand of BFM. Been around for years and spares are readily available.

If you want to pay more, you can choose a fire from one of their 'premium ranges'.

Their fires are sold through many independent fire retailers and website based stores across the country: bfm-europe.com/

I've had one of their fancy high efficiency hole in the wall fires for the last 7 years and it's been great. Watched it being installed and I know the components are well engineered (I have an engineering background).


Edited by: "aleem" 6th Oct 2015
the only building regs regarding stoves is that it is a legal requirement that a CO2 alarm must be fitted in the same room that the appliance has been installed in. if you want to check regarding linnings etc then the Building Regulations Approved Document J (ADJ), paragraph 1.36 gives guidance on why a chimney might need to be relined and how to check a chimney.
Edited by: "billythefish" 6th Oct 2015
robertoegg

Please don't perpetuate myths. There are no 'regulations' that state you … Please don't perpetuate myths. There are no 'regulations' that state you have to have a liner. A simple search online will confirm this. There are reasons you would use a liner but it is not necessary if your existing flue will do the job.


Sorry I should explain, my house was built in the 40s, so the chimney didn't have any kind of flue or liner. It was previously used for an open fire so needed a liner when the wood burner was installed. Didn't mean to perpetuate any myths.
5kw will cook you in a small room unless you learn the art of setting the right fire, with the appropriate wood or smokeless fuel and getting the airflow just right, then it's quite possible to get a very long slow burn that lasts 12+hrs on a single fill without the need to remove all your clothes.
From experience a stove will not heat the whole house.Mine is 9kw and will not heat the whole house,who wants to leave the lounge door open all the time.If you do you could treat yourself to a stove fan.I dont save very much on the gas central heating.There is a myth that these stoves are cheap to run ,well mine is certainly not.You have to factor in these costs IE,. smokeless fuel,logs,spares are mega expensive,chimney brushing annualy,liners if you need one,replacement glass rope and cement and dont forget you need a working carbon monoxide detector in the room.If you have a small room you need fresh air from an outside air brick.They are expensive to run if you dont have a free supply of logs.
hamza123

To any woodburning stove owner, how much do you save per month using one … To any woodburning stove owner, how much do you save per month using one of these as apposed to your GCH.



How long is a piece of string!? ..too many variables, you need to look into everything, insulation, fuel source, hours lit etc etc etc..
billythefish

the only building regs regarding stoves is that it is a legal requirement … the only building regs regarding stoves is that it is a legal requirement that a CO2 alarm must be fitted in the same room that the appliance has been installed in. if you want to check regarding linnings etc then the Building Regulations Approved Document J (ADJ), paragraph 1.36 gives guidance on why a chimney might need to be relined and how to check a chimney.



CO alarm, not CO2.
mrkaroshi

Good looking stove, though its only a 5KW output, so suitable for smaller … Good looking stove, though its only a 5KW output, so suitable for smaller rooms



If you have your windows fully open maybe,
Right gang, I've been doing more research today seeing as I'm likely to go ahead and put one in myself.

A useful site you may (or may not!) want to peruse --> thegreenlivingforum.net/for…2bb

An interesting sticky on hearths as well. Seems that if you invest in a decent enough burner, you can d away with the need for a constructional hearth....

Ultimately, there are lots of factors to consider and costs saved in some areas may cause a greater bill in others. Also note their advice on starting stoves slowly to allow for heating up and expansion. That way you avoid buckling them.

hope this helps...
It is £379.99 now.
niceeee added thanks
MR GUS

Multifuel = the ability to burn SEPARATELY either Wood based fuel or coal … Multifuel = the ability to burn SEPARATELY either Wood based fuel or coal based fuel. (never together)Bojangles, you scare the hell out of me! oOX)



Why never together? we do and it was advised by our installer yes he is HETAS etc to do so if we have both available. We tend to chuck coal on later on in the evening and then a lump of wood before bed and load up with coal for the overnight burn.
tafarrant

Why never together? we do and it was advised by our installer yes he is … Why never together? we do and it was advised by our installer yes he is HETAS etc to do so if we have both available. We tend to chuck coal on later on in the evening and then a lump of wood before bed and load up with coal for the overnight burn.



I've been swatting up in preparation for having a stove in the near future, this might answer your question.. (from stovesonline.co.uk).....

We do not recommend that you burn wood and coal at the same time: burning coal produces sulphuric acid and wood can contain a lot of moisture - this combination can coat your chimney in sulphuric acid solution which can quickly eat away at anything. Plus the conditions for burning wood efficiently are not the same as those for burning coal efficiently.
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