Focal Point Wall Hung Gas Fire Glass Front was £296, adds to basket at £147 delivered @ B&Q
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Focal Point Wall Hung Gas Fire Glass Front was £296, adds to basket at £147 delivered @ B&Q

SuperEd 10
SuperEd
Found 20th Jul 2015
Add to basket to get £147 price with free delivery

Pretty good reviews + Guarantee for 3 years

10 Comments

Catalytic so lots of moisture to deal with and a fair bit of soot.

james-young

Catalytic so lots of moisture to deal with and a fair bit of soot.


what does mean catalytic in this case?? anyway, is this a high performance compared to consumption?than you

Focal Point = Gash

This is a flueless gas fire. British Gas don't work on them due to concerns over there safety. You couldn't pay me to have one.

I have had one for 3 years with no problems at all.

Moisture? Soot?

'Concerns over safety'? And yet the likes of B & Q, John Lewis etc all sell such killing machines.

The only problem with this type of gas fire is that legally you need to have an air brick situated within a certain distance of the gas fire, so it really defeats the purpose. The air brick will bring in cold air (especially in winter) which will mean you'll end up using this more, equalling to a higher gas bill. Which is why I went for an electric gas fire.. No air brick needed.

gsj87

The only problem with this type of gas fire is that legally you need to … The only problem with this type of gas fire is that legally you need to have an air brick situated within a certain distance of the gas fire, so it really defeats the purpose. The air brick will bring in cold air (especially in winter) which will mean you'll end up using this more, equalling to a higher gas bill. Which is why I went for an electric gas fire.. No air brick needed.



​Agree. This was my first thought when I read the details. Doesn't make any sense. What worries me is someone moving into a propert with one of these and covering up the vent (like most people do) without knowing it's a flue less. In my personal view these should contain a carbon monoxide alarm.

heathead

​Agree. This was my first thought when I read the details. Doesn't make a … ​Agree. This was my first thought when I read the details. Doesn't make any sense. What worries me is someone moving into a propert with one of these and covering up the vent (like most people do) without knowing it's a flue less. In my personal view these should contain a carbon monoxide alarm.



Totally agree, carbon monoxide alarm is a must if you're planning on installing one of these. For the sake of a tenner to get one, it's just not worth the risk.

djdaz01

This is a flueless gas fire. British Gas don't work on them due to … This is a flueless gas fire. British Gas don't work on them due to concerns over there safety. You couldn't pay me to have one.


flueless because uses the chimney chamber which is far bigger than an ordinary pipework, so where is the problem?? can someone explain, it is only 2kw max after all, even if the chimney would be full of stuff the gases would still get out. Can someone more expert explain in details what are the danger with this gas fire??
We still got very old gas fire places not in use as we got proper central heating. When younger I remember forgetting that on all night but I never felt any minor problems at all in the morning despite the fact that I know it does use the oxygen in the room. I would like to replace what we got but just to use it as an initial booster hoping that they also look good
Edited by: "neroneuk" 21st Jul 2015

Flueless gas fired by description are fires which do not require a flue (chimney). So I'm not really sure what you mean I your question above? The fumes from the fire enter the room after passing through a catalytic converter or filter which is located at the top of the fire. Flueless fires require a fixed air vent direct to outside air to provide oxygen for combustion. This is commonly 100cm squared free area, but is dependant on the heat input (Kw) of the fire and the manufacturers specification.
The main concern for safety is the failure of the fires catalytic converter. If this were to fail then the products of combustion (fumes) would enter the room potentially causing a carbon monoxide problem. Flueless fires have obviously been tested and passed as safe to use by the powers that be. However a great number of gas fitters would recommend you steer clear of them. ( me included ). They look nice but are low powered and you get a draught from the air vent so they are kind of pointless as heating device.
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