Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Ford Fiesta Hatchback 1.0 EcoBoost Active Edition 5dr Auto 24 x £182 + (£118 admin fees) = £4,486.80 @ Leasing.com
370° Expired

Ford Fiesta Hatchback 1.0 EcoBoost Active Edition 5dr Auto 24 x £182 + (£118 admin fees) = £4,486.80 @ Leasing.com

£4,486.80Leasing.com Deals
25
370° Expired
Ford Fiesta Hatchback 1.0 EcoBoost Active Edition 5dr Auto 24 x £182 + (£118 admin fees) = £4,486.80 @ Leasing.com
Posted 30th Jul

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Another excellent deal this time for those who are after an automatic. In stock. 8k. 1+23.

24 x £182 + (£118 admin fees) = £4,486.80

£186.95 net.

Not sure if metallic paint is included on this deal.
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25 Comments
Good price.
Wish there was a deal for around £300pm net for an automatic petrol family sized vehicle.
..and it's gone
Good deal
Uranus30/07/2020 15:43

Good price.Wish there was a deal for around £300pm net for an automatic …Good price.Wish there was a deal for around £300pm net for an automatic petrol family sized vehicle.


If you stretch a wee bit you'll find something Tiguan, A4, Superb often fall into the £300 mark.
£186 a month for a rental fiesta?? lol yeah ok
Edited by: "581d" 30th Jul
581d30/07/2020 17:12

£186 a month for a rental fiesta?? lol yeah ok


Go get another car. No one is saying you have to have a Fiesta... Always one
^ That picture isn’t an Active
TheRandyPanda6930/07/2020 17:28

Go get another car. No one is saying you have to have a Fiesta... Always …Go get another car. No one is saying you have to have a Fiesta... Always one


And no one in their right mind would pay that for a fiesta
581d31/07/2020 02:17

And no one in their right mind would pay that for a fiesta


What qualifies you to make such an assessment?
Please include "lease" in the description
Uranus31/07/2020 11:27

What qualifies you to make such an assessment?


Big man on the internet is his qualifications.
Why are car leases so popular amongst users of this site? Aren't car leases considered to be the worst possible way (financially) to secure a vehicle? [Asking seriously, not trying to put down anyone]
DK_Bose31/07/2020 13:58

Why are car leases so popular amongst users of this site? Aren't car …Why are car leases so popular amongst users of this site? Aren't car leases considered to be the worst possible way (financially) to secure a vehicle? [Asking seriously, not trying to put down anyone]


I often wonder the same thing (again, serious question, everyone is entitled to their view on this but would like to understand where those who love leasing deals are coming from as my understanding is the same RE it not making financial sense).
Edited by: "arCuThEDOWDr" 31st Jul
arCuThEDOWDr31/07/2020 14:15

I often wonder the same thing (again, serious question, everyone is …I often wonder the same thing (again, serious question, everyone is entitled to their view on this but would like to understand where those who love leasing deals are coming from as my understanding is the same RE it not making financial sense).


In my case I prefer to have a new car, with all the benefits that affords.
I compare the total cost of the leasing over the period I am leasing for (usually 24 months) and then compare how much depreciation the car would have incurred had I bought new.
If the cost of the leasing is equal to, or less than the depreciation, then I know I am getting a good deal.

Consider this: you buy a brand new car for say £30000. You sell it after 2 years for say £21000. It has cost you £9000 to own it for the 2 years. Compare that with the cost of leasing the same car for 2 years.

That is my logic. Others may have their own reasons, for instance some may not want to pay interest and therefore their only real choice is leasing or finding a rare 0% finance deal on a new car. Some may not have the funds to buy a 2nd hand car up front, but the monthly lease payments may be manageable etc

IMO, leasing is not suitable for everyone. It is mostly for those who would want a brand new vehicle. I feel the majority of people would benefit better from a 2 or 3 year old 2nd hand car.
arCuThEDOWDr31/07/2020 14:15

I often wonder the same thing (again, serious question, everyone is …I often wonder the same thing (again, serious question, everyone is entitled to their view on this but would like to understand where those who love leasing deals are coming from as my understanding is the same RE it not making financial sense).



I don't understand it either. But if I wanted to appear that I was successful/minted by driving around in a borrowed car that I'd never be able to afford through actually buying it, I'd consider leasing ;-)

Semi-joking aside, I guess I can see some logic if you do a lot of miles and want something reliable, comfortable but beyond usual financial means. But, then, the lease wouldn't be that cheap for high mileage situations (?)

Mate of mine leased a car through his chum that worked for a main dealer. He got a very favourable deal - some 'friends and family' discount and leased a couple of cars over 4 years before declaring it to be a waste of money and buying a car outright again.

Still, horses for courses. I suppose that, if I purchased a Fiesta brand new and kept it for a couple of years only, the lease makes sense vs the depreciation and hassle of trading it in/flogging it. But, then, I can't see that it'd ever really make financial sense to buy a car brand new and keep it for only 2 years....
JerzyBulovski01/08/2020 00:33

I don't understand it either. But if I wanted to appear that I was …I don't understand it either. But if I wanted to appear that I was successful/minted by driving around in a borrowed car that I'd never be able to afford through actually buying it, I'd consider leasing ;-)


Guess you bought your house out-right cash and would never have a mortgage?
Jonno0203/08/2020 13:10

Guess you bought your house out-right cash and would never have a mortgage?


That comparison is not very useful.

Houses don't generally depreciate like cars.

You're comparing a lease with financing a purchase. You would be more apt to compare renting a house with leasing a car. Mortgaging a house with getting credit to buy a car.

You have options with cars that you don't have with houses. Most people would never be able to pay cash for a house. Many people can pay cash for cars if they are prudent.
leighonigar03/08/2020 13:38

That comparison is not very useful. Houses don't generally depreciate …That comparison is not very useful. Houses don't generally depreciate like cars. You're comparing a lease with financing a purchase. You would be more apt to compare renting a house with leasing a car. Mortgaging a house with getting credit to buy a car. You have options with cars that you don't have with houses. Most people would never be able to pay cash for a house. Many people can pay cash for cars if they are prudent.


Well, it is. Depreciation has absolutely nothing to do with it - nothing at all.

He says "I'd never be able to afford through actually buying it." Using that exact logic, if you mortgage a house, you can't afford it through actually buying it. You should only buy a house/flat that is in your budget paying cash. You ARE renting the house until you pay off the mortgage. The bank own it - you do not. You can tell yourself you own it, but you don't.

As a runoff from his logic - if you can afford to buy a 30k flat cash, but yet you go for a 300k detached house with a mortgage, you're just being flashy and can't really afford the house.

You can look at it from any angle you want and try to move the goalposts, but black and white - unless he bought his house cash, he's a hypocrite.
Jonno0203/08/2020 13:51

Well, it is. Depreciation has absolutely nothing to do with it - nothing …Well, it is. Depreciation has absolutely nothing to do with it - nothing at all.He says "I'd never be able to afford through actually buying it." Using that exact logic, if you mortgage a house, you can't afford it through actually buying it. You should only buy a house/flat that is in your budget paying cash. You ARE renting the house until you pay off the mortgage. The bank own it - you do not. You can tell yourself you own it, but you don't. As a runoff from his logic - if you can afford to buy a 30k flat cash, but yet you go for a 300k detached house with a mortgage, you're just being flashy and can't really afford the house.You can look at it from any angle you want and try to move the goalposts, but black and white - unless he bought his house cash, he's a hypocrite.


No, the analogy is if I decided to rent a million quid house for two years so it looked like I was minted instead of getting mortgage on a £200,000 house to buy as that is what I could afford.

In no way is it hypocritical and I buy everything cash unless it makes good sense not to and paying £4500 for a couple of years motoring compared to half that with a car purchased with cash is proof.
JerzyBulovski03/08/2020 14:51

No, the analogy is if I decided to rent a million quid house for two years …No, the analogy is if I decided to rent a million quid house for two years so it looked like I was minted instead of getting mortgage on a £200,000 house to buy as that is what I could afford. In no way is it hypocritical and I buy everything cash unless it makes good sense not to and paying £4500 for a couple of years motoring compared to half that with a car purchased with cash is proof.


No.

If you get a mortgage on a £200,000 house, you're still RENTING that from the bank. PCP, PCH, mortgage etc - you're renting from the actual owner. If you can't understand that then I don't know what to say.

I might spent £500 a month a car, to some that might be a lot. To me, it might be 10% of my take-home. It's all situational. Leasing a brand new car, you're entirely covered by warranty.
Yep, you don't own a mortgaged house but you do at the end of the mortgage or if you pay it all off years early and then use the spare cash to save money overall by buying cars cash Unless you go for a contract purchase and then commit to the final payment (how many people do that?), it's not at all the same thing.

So, my analogy still stands.

It sounds like you're also not aware that if you buy a new car outright you get at least 3 years warranty at worst up to 7 depending upon the manufacturer. Otherwise, buy it a year old and get two years warranty anyway minimum with the option to extend for a couple of hundred quid a year at most; still much less than leasing and you don't have to worry about how many miles you do.
Edited by: "JerzyBulovski" 3rd Aug
Jonno0203/08/2020 13:51

Well, it is. Depreciation has absolutely nothing to do with it - nothing …Well, it is. Depreciation has absolutely nothing to do with it - nothing at all.He says "I'd never be able to afford through actually buying it." Using that exact logic, if you mortgage a house, you can't afford it through actually buying it. You should only buy a house/flat that is in your budget paying cash. You ARE renting the house until you pay off the mortgage. The bank own it - you do not. You can tell yourself you own it, but you don't. As a runoff from his logic - if you can afford to buy a 30k flat cash, but yet you go for a 300k detached house with a mortgage, you're just being flashy and can't really afford the house.You can look at it from any angle you want and try to move the goalposts, but black and white - unless he bought his house cash, he's a hypocrite.


Cool.
Jonno0203/08/2020 15:08

No.If you get a mortgage on a £200,000 house, you're still RENTING that …No.If you get a mortgage on a £200,000 house, you're still RENTING that from the bank. PCP, PCH, mortgage etc - you're renting from the actual owner. If you can't understand that then I don't know what to say.I might spent £500 a month a car, to some that might be a lot. To me, it might be 10% of my take-home. It's all situational. Leasing a brand new car, you're entirely covered by warranty.


Borrowing money to purchase a depreciating asset is not the same as borrowing to invest/purchase a none depreciating asset.
EbenezerScrooge04/08/2020 00:04

Borrowing money to purchase a depreciating asset is not the same as …Borrowing money to purchase a depreciating asset is not the same as borrowing to invest/purchase a none depreciating asset.


You've just made a point for my side of the argument.

If it depreciates; rent it.
Jonno0204/08/2020 08:20

You've just made a point for my side of the argument. If it depreciates; …You've just made a point for my side of the argument. If it depreciates; rent it.


Up to you mate. Pay a premium for the new car and then pay a premium for the interest on top it. It makes no financial sense though so I really don't see how being financially assaulted is ever a "deal" in any way. Maybe you have already paid of you mortgage and have adequate life savings for retirement but for the rest of us getting a new car on lease is a really bad idea for our finances.
Edited by: "EbenezerScrooge" 4th Aug
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