Ford Focus 1.0 EcoBoost 140 ST-Line Navigation Car Lease (6+23 8,000mpa) £4564.53 total @ Nationwide vehicle contracts
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Ford Focus 1.0 EcoBoost 140 ST-Line Navigation Car Lease (6+23 8,000mpa) £4564.53 total @ Nationwide vehicle contracts

100
Found 13th Feb
Came across this deal on Nationwide, pretty good -
£150.57/m on a 23 + 6 meaning:
£150.57 x 23 = £3463.11
£150.57 x 6 = £903.42
Processing Fee = £198.00
Total = £4564.53 or £190.19/m
With an RRP of £21,805 this is about 21% of the value over 2 years. Anything under 25% of RRP over 2 years is considered good value.
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Includes Metallic or Mica paint finishes.

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Heat for not being VW Group cr4p
ezzer7238 m ago

Heat for not being VW Group cr4p



The reason a lot of lease at VW group is down to their strong residuals.

I am more then happy for VW to keep giving us cheap leases any cheap motoring is good in my eyes.


Also are Ecoboost engines the ones that go pop a lot ?
Edited by: "jordan210" 13th Feb
jordan2107 m ago

Also aunt Ecoboost engines the ones that go pop a lot ?


No, that’s Uncle Zetecs
ezzer7233 m ago

They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances e …They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances even.What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore the majority of buyers end up with severe negative equity.Those poor people then have matters made worse by the market being flooded with ex cheap lease cars - as I have said previously, a big bubble is gonna burst.


What a load of bull, and from a car salesman too who should know exactly how PCPs work.

If you have a PCP and the GFV on a car is say £12k after 3 years and the car is only worth £10k in p/x towards your next one then you simply hand the car back at the end of the term and walk away. Bubbles bursting on residuals for people with a PCP puts all the risk on the dealership or finance underwriter and none on the consumer.

Dealerships of all brands might soon be feeling the sting in their diesel engined midels as the government are now trying to scare everyone into petrols to significantly increase their fuel duty, VAT and VED revenue.

All the car companies were fiddling diesel NOx and CO2 figures with software optimised for the EU test cycle, VW got caught by the litigation happy yanks who'd never pursue one of their own but will help themselves to free German money.. Since that happened, most car companies upped their official CO2 figures and adjusted running software to avoid being stung.

NOx generation only became an issue with the higher operating temps of DPF equipped diesels, the old soot chuckers ran much cooler. Modern direct injection petrols chuck out soot, its a lot finer - so you may not see black clouds coming out of your exhaust, but you will see soot depositing on your tailpipes.

Particulate filters are coming for petrols too, 2 VW petrol models already have them (up! GTI and 1.4TSI Tiguan).
100 Comments
Heat for not being VW Group cr4p
ezzer7238 m ago

Heat for not being VW Group cr4p



The reason a lot of lease at VW group is down to their strong residuals.

I am more then happy for VW to keep giving us cheap leases any cheap motoring is good in my eyes.


Also are Ecoboost engines the ones that go pop a lot ?
Edited by: "jordan210" 13th Feb
ezzer725 m ago

Heat for not being VW Group cr4p


As long as the turbo coolant pipe doesn't fracture...
m5rcc2 m ago

their, you mean?More likely to be due to Volkswagen wanting to keep annual …their, you mean?More likely to be due to Volkswagen wanting to keep annual production at over 10M and leasing/finance gives them artificatal sale.



I do mean their..

They can do what ever they like if It keep lease prices cheap.
jordan2104 m ago

The reason a lot of lease at VW group is down to there strong residuals. I …The reason a lot of lease at VW group is down to there strong residuals. I am more then happy for VW to keep giving us cheap leases any cheap motoring is good in my eyes.Also aunt Ecoboost engines the ones that go pop a lot ?



their, you mean?

More likely to be due to Volkswagen wanting to keep annual production at over 10M and leasing/finance gives them artificial sale.
Think you should add that it’s for 8000 miles a year
m5rcc5 m ago

As long as the turbo coolant pipe doesn't fracture...


Sure, I know Fords are not without their issues, but at least people know what they are getting into - no false reputations.
jordan2107 m ago

Also aunt Ecoboost engines the ones that go pop a lot ?


No, that’s Uncle Zetecs
jordan21013 m ago

The reason a lot of lease at VW group is down to their strong residuals.


They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances even.

What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore the majority of buyers end up with severe negative equity.

Those poor people then have matters made worse by the market being flooded with ex cheap lease cars - as I have said previously, a big bubble is gonna burst.
m5rcc14 m ago

As long as the turbo coolant pipe doesn't fracture...


Surely that's the beauty of a lease deal? The car is in warranty for the whole time - if it goes pop, Ford fix it, give you a courtesy car while they're doing it - only a minor hiccup.

If you're really worried about it you could always pay the £19 a month extra for servicing...
ezzer722 m ago

as I have said previously, a big bubble is gonna burst.


And many people are in complete denial about this. Add Dieselgate as the catalyst...
ezzer723 m ago

They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances e …They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances even.What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore the majority of buyers end up with severe negative equity.Those poor people then have matters made worse by the market being flooded with ex cheap lease cars - as I have said previously, a big bubble is gonna burst.


Who cares what the car is worth at the end of the PCP. Just hand it back.
iwansdad3 m ago

Surely that's the beauty of a lease deal? The car is in warranty for the …Surely that's the beauty of a lease deal? The car is in warranty for the whole time - if it goes pop, Ford fix it, give you a courtesy car while they're doing it - only a minor hiccup.


Well it's an inconvenience isn't it? You rather not have to breakdown, call Ford/AA/RAC, tow it, wait, get a courtesy car.

iwansdad3 m ago

If you're really worried about it you could always pay the £19 a month …If you're really worried about it you could always pay the £19 a month extra for servicing...


Servicing would not have solved that particilar issue. It was a design fault.
ezzer727 m ago

What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore …What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore the majority of buyers end up with severe negative equity.


Surely that doesn't apply to PCH? As long as you have gap insurance (in case you write the car off) then it's the lease company's problem if it's worth less than they thought when you hand it back.
markymark348 m ago

Who cares what the car is worth at the end of the PCP. Just hand it back.


A couple of problems with that.

VW Group PCPs are generally 48 months, and their troublesome cars only come with a 36 month warranty (I’m sure they’d love to go back to the old 12 months warranty days if they could).

48 months is a long time to keep a car, and I get people coming to see me every day trying to escape early, but very rarely can, due to huge neg eq.

The record breaker recently was a guy with a Leon estate, it was some high spec thing, a Cupra DSG I think.

Car worth £11,250, outstanding finance £18,800 😳😳
iwansdad5 m ago

Surely that doesn't apply to PCH? As long as you have gap insurance (in …Surely that doesn't apply to PCH? As long as you have gap insurance (in case you write the car off) then it's the lease company's problem if it's worth less than they thought when you hand it back.


You are right mate, but mustn’t have read the full conversation, take another look
ezzer725 m ago

Car worth £11,250, outstanding finance £18,800 😳😳


Genius!
ezzer7233 m ago

They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances e …They don’t have particularly good residuals, poor in some instances even.What confuses people is on PCPs they have very high GFVs, and therefore the majority of buyers end up with severe negative equity.Those poor people then have matters made worse by the market being flooded with ex cheap lease cars - as I have said previously, a big bubble is gonna burst.


What a load of bull, and from a car salesman too who should know exactly how PCPs work.

If you have a PCP and the GFV on a car is say £12k after 3 years and the car is only worth £10k in p/x towards your next one then you simply hand the car back at the end of the term and walk away. Bubbles bursting on residuals for people with a PCP puts all the risk on the dealership or finance underwriter and none on the consumer.

Dealerships of all brands might soon be feeling the sting in their diesel engined midels as the government are now trying to scare everyone into petrols to significantly increase their fuel duty, VAT and VED revenue.

All the car companies were fiddling diesel NOx and CO2 figures with software optimised for the EU test cycle, VW got caught by the litigation happy yanks who'd never pursue one of their own but will help themselves to free German money.. Since that happened, most car companies upped their official CO2 figures and adjusted running software to avoid being stung.

NOx generation only became an issue with the higher operating temps of DPF equipped diesels, the old soot chuckers ran much cooler. Modern direct injection petrols chuck out soot, its a lot finer - so you may not see black clouds coming out of your exhaust, but you will see soot depositing on your tailpipes.

Particulate filters are coming for petrols too, 2 VW petrol models already have them (up! GTI and 1.4TSI Tiguan).
monkeyhanger752 m ago

If you have a PCP and the GFV on a car is say £12k after 3 years and the …If you have a PCP and the GFV on a car is say £12k after 3 years and the car is only worth £10k in p/x towards your next one then you simply hand the car back at the end of the term and walk away.


It's probably more likely that dealer will offer a contribution towards your next PCP. They don't want to lose your custom, surely?
monkeyhanger7510 m ago

What a load of bull, and from a car salesman too who should know exactly …What a load of bull, and from a car salesman too who should know exactly how PCPs work. If you have a PCP and the GFV on a car is say £12k after 3 years and the car is only worth £10k in p/x towards your next one then you simply hand the car back at the end of the term and walk away. Bubbles bursting on residuals for people with a PCP puts all the risk on the dealership or finance underwriter and none on the consumer.Dealerships of all brands might soon be feeling the sting in their diesel engined midels as the government are now trying to scare everyone into petrols to significantly increase their fuel duty, VAT and VED revenue. All the car companies were fiddling diesel NOx and CO2 figures with software optimised for the EU test cycle, VW got caught by the litigation happy yanks who'd never pursue one of their own but will help themselves to free German money.. Since that happened, most car companies upped their official CO2 figures and adjusted running software to avoid being stung. NOx generation only became an issue with the higher operating temps of DPF equipped diesels, the old soot chuckers ran much cooler. Modern direct injection petrols chuck out soot, its a lot finer - so you may not see black clouds coming out of your exhaust, but you will see soot depositing on your tailpipes. Particulate filters are coming for petrols too, 2 VW petrol models already have them (up! GTI and 1.4TSI Tiguan).


I know exactly how it all works, and have quoted no bull at all. I know that a car can be handed back at the END of a PCP, but that doesn’t change the fact that the vast majority of VWG ‘owners’ will be in a position of negative equity, with no alternative than to wait the full term and walk away with zero equity.

As I have said a few times already recently, the cheating situation is STILL known as the Volkswagen Emissions Scandal over 2 years later. Only VW employees have been jailed.

p.s. By the burst bubble, I was referring to how much trouble VWG themselves are in, rather than customers - wait and see

p.p.s. Negative equity doesn’t cost dealers anything, apart from loss of repeat business. As VW have their own finance division, they are going to feel all the pain
Edited by: "ezzer72" 13th Feb
ezzer7232 m ago

A couple of problems with that.VW Group PCPs are generally 48 months, and …A couple of problems with that.VW Group PCPs are generally 48 months, and their troublesome cars only come with a 36 month warranty (I’m sure they’d love to go back to the old 12 months warranty days if they could).48 months is a long time to keep a car, and I get people coming to see me every day trying to escape early, but very rarely can, due to huge neg eq.The record breaker recently was a guy with a Leon estate, it was some high spec thing, a Cupra DSG I think.Car worth £11,250, outstanding finance £18,800 😳😳


Worth £11250 to you, will be worth more to a dealership of the beand that the car belongs to. Take a Kia to a BMW dealership in p/x and you'll gave your pants pulled down as much as taking a Seat to a Kia dealer. No-one goes to a Kia dealer to buy a Seat and vice-versa.

Sounds to me that whoever brought that Seat in negotiated very little discount when they bought it and are looking to get out very esrly in the PCP term - more fool.them.

Most VAG PCP examples are over 3 years, not 4, although you can tailor to suit. Generally though, the monthlies differences between 3 and 4 years are coppers. Most go for 3 years as the dealerships would rather sell on a 3 year old car.
monkeyhanger756 m ago

Most go for 3 years as the dealerships would rather sell on a 3 year old …Most go for 3 years as the dealerships would rather sell on a 3 year old car.


Or that customers do not want to be lumbered with an MOT and warrnty expiration...
monkeyhanger757 m ago

Worth £11250 to you, will be worth more to a dealership of the beand that …Worth £11250 to you, will be worth more to a dealership of the beand that the car belongs to.


£7,500 more?

You are actually showing your lack of knowledge now.

ALL brands/dealers use the same guides, primarily CAP. We called a couple of SEAT dealers, it was one of those that bid £11,250.

The only difference in reality is an overpriced BMW has a larger profit margin than a sensibily priced Kia. Therefore, against another ‘expensive’ car, a bit of an over allowance will be offered to make the deal artificially attractive, but there are no magic solutions to neg eq.
ezzer7216 m ago

I know exactly how it all works, and have quoted no bull at all. I know …I know exactly how it all works, and have quoted no bull at all. I know that a car can be handed back at the END of a PCP, but that doesn’t change the fact that the vast majority of VWG ‘owners’ will be in a position of negative equity, with no alternative than to wait the full term and walk away with zero equity.As I have said a few times already recently, the cheating situation is STILL known as the Volkswagen Emissions Scandal over 2 years later. Only VW employees have been jailed.p.s. By the burst bubble, I was referring to how much trouble VWG themselves are in, rather than customers - wait and seep.p.s. Negative equity doesn’t cost dealers anything, apart from loss of repeat business. As VW have their own finance division, they are going to feel all the pain


No matter what car you buy under PCP, you will be in negative equity for most of the term.unless you put a massive deposit down which more than covers year 1 depreciation. This is true of all marques - PCP covers depreciation under your term of "ownership".

You're either paying big deposits and then monthlies which would not cover monthly depreciation as the deposit erodes over the term, or a small/no deposit and pay higher monthlies than the monthly depreciation to "catch up" on the negative equity you start with.

Your point of negative equity is not a VAG thing, it is a PCP thing. What I have stated above is as applicable to a Kia as it is a VAG.
monkeyhanger758 m ago

No matter what car you buy under PCP, you will be in negative equity for …No matter what car you buy under PCP, you will be in negative equity for most of the term.unless you put a massive deposit down which more than covers year 1 depreciation. This is true of all marques - PCP covers depreciation under your term of "ownership".You're either paying big deposits and then monthlies which would not cover monthly depreciation as the deposit erodes over the term, or a small/no deposit and pay higher monthlies than the monthly depreciation to "catch up" on the negative equity you start with.Your point of negative equity is not a VAG thing, it is a PCP thing. What I have stated above is as applicable to a Kia as it is a VAG.


To be fair, that is more accurate than your other posts, but I have never come across a Kia in almost 7 years with the brand with anything like £7,000 negative equity. Usually if people want to change a year early they might have minus £500 on a Picanto or Rio, and +£1000 on a Sportage.

If they wait until the end, probably £500-£1000 positive equity on one of the smaller cars, £2000-£4000 on a Sportage.

Kia only do 36m PCPs btw.
Edited by: "ezzer72" 13th Feb
ezzer727 m ago

£7,500 more?You are actually showing your lack of knowledge now.ALL …£7,500 more?You are actually showing your lack of knowledge now.ALL brands/dealers use the same guides, primarily CAP. We called a couple of SEAT dealers, it was one of those that bid £11,250.The only difference in reality is an overpriced BMW has a larger profit margin than a sensibily priced Kia. Therefore, against another ‘expensive’ car, a bit of an over allowance will be offered to make the deal artificially attractive, but there are no magic solutions to neg eq.


Read the post you responded to properly and take it all in context. If someone tries to get out of a PCP very early (before 2/3 of their term is up) and didn't put a massive deposit down then they will be in negative equity.
Thought i'd clicked on the wrong thread. Deal is for a Ford but nearly all the comments are about VAG.

Reasonable deal, just be mindful an all new Focus is due out this year.
ezzer723 m ago

To be fair, that is more accurate than your other posts, but I have never …To be fair, that is more accurate than your other posts, but I have never come across a Kia in almost 7 years with the brand with anything like £7,000 negative equity. Usually if people want to change a year early they might have -£500 on a Picanto or Rio, and +£1000 on a Sportage


£7000 negative equity has everything to do with wanting out of a PCP very early and little to nothing to do with Seat residuals (that you have implied were very low and the cause of such a large amount of negative equity).
Guzzle1 m ago

Thought i'd clicked on the wrong thread. Deal is for a Ford but nearly all …Thought i'd clicked on the wrong thread. Deal is for a Ford but nearly all the comments are about VAG.Reasonable deal, just be mindful an all new Focus is due out this year.


Ezzer hates VAGs because his ex ran off with an Audi salesman.
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monkeyhanger752 m ago

Ezzer hates VAGs because his ex ran off with an Audi salesman.


Haha

They didn’t get far though - the car broke down.
Edited by: "ezzer72" 13th Feb
monkeyhanger752 m ago

£7000 negative equity has everything to do with wanting out of a PCP very …£7000 negative equity has everything to do with wanting out of a PCP very early and little to nothing to do with Seat residuals (that you have implied were very low and the cause of such a large amount of negative equity).


He was only about halfway through, but no excuse for over £7,000.
Suggest people who post lease deals to include car RRP and % of the total cost of lease of RRP. Anything costing less than 25% of cars value over two years is good value. That's the main indicator of a good or bad lease deal.
How about the seat (vw group)?
Ghostrecon8 m ago

How about the seat (vw group)?


I don’t understand the question sorry mate?
ezzer7238 m ago

To be fair, that is more accurate than your other posts, but I have never …To be fair, that is more accurate than your other posts, but I have never come across a Kia in almost 7 years with the brand with anything like £7,000 negative equity. Usually if people want to change a year early they might have minus £500 on a Picanto or Rio, and +£1000 on a Sportage.If they wait until the end, probably £500-£1000 positive equity on one of the smaller cars, £2000-£4000 on a Sportage.Kia only do 36m PCPs btw.


If someone buys a Sportage from you on a 3 year PCP with minimal deposit and wants out after 8 months and takes it to a Ford/BMW/Renault/Whatever garage (or even back to Kia) then they'll be in massive negative equity too. Simple maths, nowt to do with the marque chosen. How much are Sportages new, mid range? £25k? Can you negotiate 15% off (Broker price)? So you have the ability to buy a "£25k" car for a smidge over £21k. You buy it new on Monday and want out 2 days later, dealer will offer you £17k tops. They want 15% margin to sell it again for £20k (it has to be cheap enough to want it over a factory order to your spec/colour that was bought at heavy discount). There's £8k lost in a matter of days if you paid RRP or £4250 if you got 15% off. That's an extreme but plausible example for someone that changed their mind after 2 days. Months down the line to chop in and it won't be quite that bad as PCP payments nibble into that negative equity every month.

Most likely for Mr/Mrs Seat, they had their car rammed with optional exrras, which always cost a lot over the term, to be in such negative equity. So to put your Seat story in context, how far in to their PCP were they, what was their full term length and what was their GFV figure?
Edited by: "monkeyhanger75" 13th Feb
A good price for the lease but the excess mileage charges are rather excessive.
m5rcc1 h, 26 m ago

Well it's an inconvenience isn't it? You rather not have to breakdown, …Well it's an inconvenience isn't it? You rather not have to breakdown, call Ford/AA/RAC, tow it, wait, get a courtesy car. Servicing would not have solved that particilar issue. It was a design fault.


Is it fixed now? Just bought a Fiesta with this engine.
Besford3 m ago

Is it fixed now? Just bought a Fiesta with this engine.


Yes - as long as relatively new or you've taken an early model through the dealer network for a service. The problem was with the degas pipe that takes superheated steam from the watercooled turbo back to the coolant expansion tank. Great Ford design allowed for a weak union in the pipe that could fracture, leading to the engine losing its coolant and since it is a tiny engine with a very small coolant capacity, it lead to some fatal incidents. The problem was realised and the degas pipe was redesigned some years ago. These days, the problem would only arise where the cars have been independently serviced and the degas pipe has not been replaced.
monkeyhanger7510 m ago

If someone buys a Sportage from you on a 3 year PCP with minimal deposit …If someone buys a Sportage from you on a 3 year PCP with minimal deposit and wants out after 8 months and takes it to a Ford/BMW/Renault/Whatever garage then they'll be in massive negative equity too. Simple maths, nowt to do with the marque chosen. How much are Sportages new, mid range? £25k? Can you negotiate 15% off (Broker price)? So you have the ability to buy a "£25k" car for a smidge over £21k. You buy it new on Monday and want out 2 days later, dealer will offer you £17k tops. They want 15% margin to sell it again for £20k (it has to be cheap enough to want it over a factory order to your spec/colour). There's £8k lost in a matter of days if you paid RRP or £4250 if you got 15% off.Most likely for Mr/Mrs Seat, they had their car rammed with optional exrras, which always cost a lot over the term, to be in such negative equity. So to put your Seat story in context, how far in to their PCP were they, what was their full term length and what was their GFV figure?


Honestly, those Sportage figures are nothing like how they stack up in reality, however, you are totally right in that if someone came in REALLY early, like 8 months (which never really happens, people usually get bored of a car somewhere between 24 and 36 months - there are stats that prove this is the most popular change time) and had paid no deposit, they would be in negative equity.

Even then though, I would think £2000 tops, nothing like the £7500 in my genuine example.
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