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FORTUNE COOKIES -£2 [email protected] LEWIS
FORTUNE COOKIES -£2 DELIVERED@JOHN LEWIS

FORTUNE COOKIES -£2 [email protected] LEWIS

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The Year of the Rat has just started in the Chinese New Year and these fortune cookies may be fun for some.... As people may know, they are edible yummy cookies which have messages of fortune in them. Great for a family treat after a meal or just to try something
cultural after a dinner party.....at £2 this is not prohibitively expensive..Could be a novel valentine present for romantics who want to wish eachother good fortune....!

They also have further reductions in the Chinese range;
Paint your own Chinese bowls and spoons £10 reduced from £20
Chinese Origami set £3 ( only 6 in stock)

7 Comments

Good find Leska & congrats on yours 100 posts

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w302/bucketandbucket/fortunecook.jpg

Not knocking the fortune cookie deal but I found it interesting that John Lewis chose to produce/buy in a "Chinese origami set" as part of this range when it's always traditionally thought of as a JAPANESE art......
...maybe they felt all Asian culture is interchangable??!?!


(If I'm wrong & there is a vast Origami culture in China also, I stand to be corrected)

CHARLIETHIRTYTWO;1566377

Not knocking the fortune cookie deal but I found it interesting that John … Not knocking the fortune cookie deal but I found it interesting that John Lewis chose to produce/buy in a "Chinese origami set" as part of this range when it's always traditionally thought of as a JAPANESE art.........maybe they felt all Asian culture is interchangable??!?!(If I'm wrong & there is a vast Origami culture in China also, I stand to be corrected)



Many common popular things are pervasive right across South East Asia, just like chips, piano, ballet etc. right across Europe. However during the Communist era very little of China was known in this period. Therefore many people had learnt about the South East culture through Japan which was very close to America at the time (and still is). Likewise at the moment very little is known about the Arabic cultures and richness in customs. This is because the news media has self censorship and only has capability to report most of the time any thing begins with the letters terr****. During the 50's, 60's the West , likewise, only had capability to report on items with words which began with comm****. Origami is very common in the Far East because it started with paper and the need to package and to fold up things within it. Closely associated with it is the paper cutting and also cloth origami. During the 50's and 60's there was heavy penetration and expansion of USA influence right across the Pacific rim countries. Origami was one of those items that they heavily promoted as distinctly oriental and as they could not do anything with China , Korean and Vietnam many of the relationships went to Japan instead. After all they could not possibly promote these countries' cultures when USA was at tension with most of them! Similarly many people learnt manga, saki, go from Japan, likewise these have their own versions in other Asian countries. In the main, diversity and progressions ensure that there is not a single traditional version. As to Fortune Cookies, its origin was Chinese thinking but the actual physical object first appeared in China Town in Carlifornia USA. Just like Chop Sui and Mixed Vegetables stirred fries, these are not traditional Chinese items but are emergence of new styles and cultures as part of diversification and evolutionary progression. If one always sticks to the absolute traditional source of everything there will be no new things and no progression. After all in England there are more English people who eat Chicken Tikka Masala rather than Indians.

CHARLIETHIRTYTWO;1566377

Not knocking the fortune cookie deal but I found it interesting that John … Not knocking the fortune cookie deal but I found it interesting that John Lewis chose to produce/buy in a "Chinese origami set" as part of this range when it's always traditionally thought of as a JAPANESE art.........maybe they felt all Asian culture is interchangable??!?!(If I'm wrong & there is a vast Origami culture in China also, I stand to be corrected)


my sister in law is chinese and she does origami and i think they did a lot of it at school but i will ask her more on the subject

It's not that I felt it was totally wrong & that there weren't 'exchanges' of art, cuisine, culture between different Asian cultures it was just that I felt that the art was so closely associated with Japan that maybe John Lewis could have found something more traditionally Chinese & it just seemed like an "Asian" cop-out.....

Thanks to both Splender & Miffy121 for the extra info

out of stock

sold out
:cry:
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