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Free 30 day low carb cookbook and meal plan from diabetes.co.uk
Free 30 day low carb cookbook and meal plan from diabetes.co.uk

Free 30 day low carb cookbook and meal plan from diabetes.co.uk

Free low carb cookbook and 30 day meal plan. It includes low carb offerings for breakfast lunch and dinner. Seems to offer a bit of variety.

It's a PDF and clocks in at over 30MB so be careful if you're on a mobile.

18 Comments

Thanks for this. I'll have a look on pc later on. I've been on atkins since January so hoping some good Ideas for me x

Thank you for this. Will be useful to get my diabetes back on track after the Christmas excesses!

I'm a somewhat underweight diabetic... An unusual beast according. to the doc!
I wonder if reading this back to front will help!?!

Thank OP for the find nice one
Thanks also to BrumGB for the link saved filling out the form
Wife is a member but not noticed the cookbook to be honest she only goes on there a few times a year.

There's a lot of stuff in there that couldn't possibly be considered low carb and definitely not suitable for type 2 diabetics.

I downloaded it, read it, then deleted it. Virtually nothing in there that's suitable for me to eat.

Thanks

shakeyjake66

There's a lot of stuff in there that couldn't possibly be considered low … There's a lot of stuff in there that couldn't possibly be considered low carb and definitely not suitable for type 2 diabetics.I downloaded it, read it, then deleted it. Virtually nothing in there that's suitable for me to eat.



Tks for the review so I don't waste my time (just in the hope that they FINALLY got to the point!).

So is it the same old story: have healthy whole grains for breakfast, low-fat sandwich for lunch and lean chicken breast with mash for dinner, washed down with a healthy orange juice at only 200g carbs/day? And don't you worry, we are here to medicate you.

Hmm, i think you can eat anything in moderantion. Obviously orange juice is a no go, any type of juice for breakfast. tea minus sugar, basically just try to keep away from sugar. and thing pasta. any mashed potato as its startchy, you have have a little bit, but whole potatoes are better for you as they havent been squished to release more startch/sugar. you do need a lil bit of sugar, jelly babies are good supposedly when you feel `funny`. you can have a few biscuits, plain/digestive ones. its basically not to go crazy on sugar. also try to keep to low fats, very few chips, or things cooked in fat. one of my family got Diabetes last year,

Polly_P

Hmm, i think you can eat anything in moderantion. Obviously orange juice … Hmm, i think you can eat anything in moderantion. Obviously orange juice is a no go, any type of juice for breakfast. tea minus sugar, basically just try to keep away from sugar. and thing pasta. any mashed potato as its startchy, you have have a little bit, but whole potatoes are better for you as they havent been squished to release more startch/sugar. you do need a lil bit of sugar, jelly babies are good supposedly when you feel `funny`. you can have a few biscuits, plain/digestive ones. its basically not to go crazy on sugar. also try to keep to low fats, very few chips, or things cooked in fat. one of my family got Diabetes last year,



How does low fat affect glucose levels?

That's a lot of mixed up information you've got there. Lots of it pretty bogus too. This is why most diabetics have serious side effects. They blindly believe what the dietician tells them to eat.

If I followed my dietician's advice, my glucose levels would be out of control and I'd be suffering from some of the unpleasant effects of uncontrolled Diabetes.

Luckily, living in Wales, I was given a blood glucose meter when I was diagnosed, and after six months regular testing, discovered what my body could and could not tolerate. I say my body, because everyone is different and the only way to find out what's suitable for your own body as a diabetic is to test your body's reaction to each food and keep a log. It won't take long before you have a comprehensive list of good/medium/bad things for you to eat.

Carbohydrates and the Glycemic index are the things to take note of.

(Wheat is the carbohydrate equivalent of sugar pretty much, and should be avoided even in wholegrain.)

If you keep your blood glucose low then there is nothing that could go up and down. Eat as much (good) fat as you want to keep you satiated, lots of low-carb veggies and moderate amounts of protein.

Only that if you do that, you can remove the need of medication. Ups!

Comment

MmMd

If you keep your blood glucose low then there is nothing that could go up … If you keep your blood glucose low then there is nothing that could go up and down. Eat as much (good) fat as you want to keep you satiated, lots of low-carb veggies and moderate amounts of protein.Only that if you do that, you can remove the need of medication. Ups!

I do hope that isn't a type 1 recommendation

MmMd

I do hope that isn't a type 1 recommendation



I don't see why that would be bad for type 1 diabetes. It's a healthy way of eating and would need low doses of insulin to cope with the low glucose levels associated with it. After all, the whole purpose of insulin injections is to keep the blood glucose levels low , but without being so low as to cause a hypo.

What do you think the problem would be ?

Edited by: "shakeyjake66" 13th Dec 2014

shakeyjake66

I don't see why that would be bad for type 1 diabetes. It's a healthy way … I don't see why that would be bad for type 1 diabetes. It's a healthy way of eating and would need low doses of insulin to cope with the low glucose levels associated with it. After all, the whole purpose of insulin injections is to keep the blood glucose levels low , but without being so low as to cause a hypo. What do you think the problem would be ?


The removing the medication part would be the bad part for type 1 diabetes. I have a friend whose crazy father thought it was ok to stick her on such diets and refuse to let her get any medication because 'he knew better'. She ended up in a coma and barely survived. Since then she has had 2 strokes because of the irreparable vascular damage it has caused and probably has a much shorter lifespan. There's is nothing wrong with the diet suggestions, but anyone advising that can remove the need for medication ie. insulin, is irresponsible and naive

Don't th

dreamager

The removing the medication part would be the bad part for type 1 … The removing the medication part would be the bad part for type 1 diabetes. I have a friend whose crazy father thought it was ok to stick her on such diets and refuse to let her get any medication because 'he knew better'. She ended up in a coma and barely survived. Since then she has had 2 strokes because of the irreparable vascular damage it has caused and probably has a much shorter lifespan. There's is nothing wrong with the diet suggestions, but anyone advising that can remove the need for medication ie. insulin, is irresponsible and naive



Don't think anyone would suggest stopping insulin injections for somebody who's body has completely stopped producing insulin. Pretty much the only medication where it wouldn't be possible to negate the need for it using dietary restrictions would be insulin.

Anybody who produces at least some insulin can have their insulin resistance improved by exercise, dietary changes and also, limiting the amount of carbohydrates in their meals decreases the need for large amounts of insulin to be produced.

It's quite possible to come off medication in many cases, as long as blood glucose levels are monitored.

shakeyjake66

Don't thDon't think anyone would suggest stopping insulin injections for … Don't thDon't think anyone would suggest stopping insulin injections for somebody who's body has completely stopped producing insulin. Pretty much the only medication where it wouldn't be possible to negate the need for it using dietary restrictions would be insulin. Anybody who produces at least some insulin can have their insulin resistance improved by exercise, dietary changes and also, limiting the amount of carbohydrates in their meals decreases the need for large amounts of insulin to be produced. It's quite possible to come off medication in many cases, as long as blood glucose levels are monitored.


Hence me asking for the clarification

:p:p

great:)
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