Free Blood Glucose Monitor
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Free Blood Glucose Monitor

33
Found 27th Oct 2013Made hot 27th Oct 2013
neTouch® is offering their latest OneTouch® Verio®IQ Blood Glucose Monitoring System, absolutely FREE* to those who are on insulin therapy. Available in the UK and the Republic of Ireland.
Shared Via The HUKD App For Android.

33 Comments

I have applied for and am being sent one. I am not on insulin but other injection therapy. this monitor looks good

quine

I have applied for and am being sent one. I am not on insulin but other … I have applied for and am being sent one. I am not on insulin but other injection therapy. this monitor looks good



thanks for informing those who need it that you've reduced their stock by 1

I certainly do need it as I have to test my blood glucose three times a day the same as those on insulin. I also have to keep a diary of the readings to report to my diabetic consultant when I go to hospital. I was merely saying that to help other people.
Please think twice before being so judgmental about something you clearly have the wrong information about.

there are other types of injection used for diabetes that is not insulin. and no it us not heroin. why so insulting about something you don't know about. unlike you I was trying to help other people.

I agree with the others.

Leave this for those who need it, don't be taking it just because it looks like a 'cool gadget'.

I do need it. I use a monitor and the application process asks which kind of treatment you use which I answered truthfully. it then told me I qualified. I am sorry if I gave upset people by telling the truth and only as I thought it would help othets. pleade get off your high horse

Quine your initial comment gave the wrong impression hence us high horse riders responses with the trusty sword of truthfulness and shield of condemnation.

I'm sure your forgiven - this time

superflyguy

I'm sure your forgiven - this time




But will you be?

If a person NEEDS to test their sugars as stipulated by a Doctor or Consultant you are given one on the NHS, you can then get the test strips on prescription - so no - I don't understand why anyone would really need one as they are supplied TO THOSE THAT NEED IT anyway.
If you NEED a glucose monitor and haven't got one ASK your GP or Consultant for one, if they say no, ask them why you can't get one on the NHS. Usually the answer will be is because you do not actually need it.
Basically, the 'worried well' want one, everyone else will already have one.
Edited by: "lljwagg" 27th Oct 2013

Ordered 20 to make a fortune profit down the local clinic......

Seriously, haven't ordered but have informed someone who would be interested and have a need for one. Thanks Bozza

have ordered for my dad, he will be very happy, thanks
he's been insulin based for years and nearly lost him a few years ago
heat added

just be sure that your surgery/gp will prescribe the test strips !!!

these are usually supplied free to your local health centre, i think the companies make the money from the testing strips, so if you need a new one then just ask your nurse at the diabetes clinic, think i am on my 3rd one now as i think when they push up the price of the test strips then i am issued a new machine again

My hubby is type 2 diabetic - he's on tablets. Would he benefit from this device? He has his blood sugar tested every 3 months at surgery, atm. Thanks!

Lyniced16

My hubby is type 2 diabetic - he's on tablets. Would he benefit from … My hubby is type 2 diabetic - he's on tablets. Would he benefit from this device? He has his blood sugar tested every 3 months at surgery, atm. Thanks!



No, T2DM's on oral therapy only do not need at home BM machines and thr advicde from SIGN/NICE is that they do not need to regularly record BM's as it will not alter the treatment they are on.
Hope that helps.

Great find.....For those who need it.

Thanks OP...Hot

Cool gadget.

I'm T1 and I'm currently using the Glucomen LX tester. I think the one in the deal does not test for keytones.

Let my boyf know and he says he already has one (?), can't say I'm an expert on these monitors. But yes, please let these go to people who really need it

He has Addisons and Type I Diabetes "rarer than rocking horse sh*t", as he puts it.
Edited by: "louiselouise" 27th Oct 2013

free to thoses on insulin ?

err my daughter is type 1 and her accucheck meters are free ?

how is this a deal ?

Makes a great Christmas gift for my diabetic friends

Sounds a good offer

I put in for a free glucose monitor from an offer on a diabetic forum a while back because I thought maybe it would save my surgery a few quid as the one they'd provided me with needed replacing. But when I rang to ask about having the test strips on prescription I was told they didn't do them for that machine, so the surgery provided me with a brand new machine anyway.
I agree that this is how the companies make their money. The costs on test strips can be a fair amount. And if you're having to test your bloods two or three times a day it soon eats them up.
I would echo the advice given before that said if you need a meter, you will be given one free by your surgery/clinic.

For people living with type 1 diabetes a blood glucose monitor is obviously vital. Not all GP's or clinics will give them free, and even if they do, they may not have the one your want. It's good that the OP posted this deal, some people may think that the monitor supplied by a clinic or their HCP is the only one that they can use. Try as many as possible, and use the one that helps you manage the condition best. Managing diabetes is not easy and every BG monitor is different, some fit in a pocket, and have fewer features such as BG trends and carb analysis, some have sticks and finger pricker built in. Some work with iPhones, some communicate with insulin pumps and others can upload results to your health care team. To manage the condition well the most important thing is that a patient has a machine they will use regularly, carry with them and that they understand. Some people may have a machine they carry around, a machine at work and a machine by the bed. It is very advisable to have a spare, these monitors are used 4 - 8 times each day to make vital treatment decisions. The biggest cost to the NHS is from complications caused by poorly managed diabetes.

This meter requires a very small sample size, has a light to help see the sample sight, has a colour screen and memory for around 750 results. It's not suitable for alternative sight testing, and uniquely has a rechargeable battery, it comes with a USB charger, and should last 7-14 days between charges. The strips make it easy to apply blood from either hand as it can take the sample from the left or right of the strip. The meter looks for patterns of low and high readings and provides 7, 14, 30 and 90 day averages, from easy to access and understand menus. You can add meal and carb tags to each reading to help identify changes to your treatment.

Free? Well, yeah, but they sell on Amazon for $9.99 - just over 6 quid. What's not free are the consumables - the strips cost over $65 / 40 quid for 100, which will last most users less than a month.

No, T2DM's on oral therapy only do not need at home BM machines and the … No, T2DM's on oral therapy only do not need at home BM machines and the advicde from SIGN/NICE is that they do not need to regularly record BM's as it will not alter the treatment they are on.



Rubbish - The advice is incorrect, as is the majority of advice given out by the NHS. The simple fact is that without checking bloods you as an individual will not know what foods work and what doesn't. If you have no idea of this what chance do you have of controlling it? The meds will only do so much. The long term effects of what you are eating and how it affects you could lead to much more drastic consequences down the line. It needs an effort on the patients behalf to make sure that they are pro-active in their own care. IMHO monitors and regular testing is vital for ANYONE with diabetes. If you think you can wing it solely on meds and WITHOUT monitoring the effects of foodstuffs then good luck, that's all I can say.

Oh I'm type 2 but the way and I pay for my strips. My recent logging of blood levels has determined that the meds I am on were not working correctly, and after consultation I have been changed to a different type. Without checking my own levels I would still be on the same meds which coincidently were doing more damage to my body than good.
Edited by: "Simon_G" 29th Oct 2013

razorhorde

thanks for informing those who need it that you've reduced their stock by … thanks for informing those who need it that you've reduced their stock by 1



Dude, lay off! The poster said he's on other injection therapy - i.e. he's diabetic, and on injections, just not insulin! Who are you to judge if he needs the monitor? There are other injection therapies out there besides insulin, you know. You can be type 2 and be on injections (including insulin!). I guess the poster is on exenatide injections, which means his type 2 diabetes is quite bad and requires more intense monitoring.

Edited by: "Prufrock" 29th Oct 2013

DrJayDee86

No, T2DM's on oral therapy only do not need at home BM machines and thr … No, T2DM's on oral therapy only do not need at home BM machines and thr advicde from SIGN/NICE is that they do not need to regularly record BM's as it will not alter the treatment they are on.Hope that helps.



You're wrong - even those on oral medication need to test their bloods regularly to see if there's any big change. If there is, they could well be put on injections such as insulin or exenatide. Put it another way; if what you said is true, there would be no type 2 diabetics on insulin or exenatide injections, as you seem to insinuate that type 2 diabetes doesn't get worse even with careful control! Incidentally, I have an uncle who is on insulin for his type 2 diabetes and my dad's on exenatide (type 2 also).

Prufrock

You're wrong - even those on oral medication need to test their bloods … You're wrong - even those on oral medication need to test their bloods regularly to see if there's any big change. If there is, they could well be put on injections such as insulin or exenatide. Put it another way; if what you said is true, there would be no type 2 diabetics on insulin or exenatide injections, as you seem to insinuate that type 2 diabetes doesn't get worse even with careful control! Incidentally, I have an uncle who is on insulin for his type 2 diabetes and my dad's on exenatide (type 2 also).



I think 'you're wrong' is a little blunt, as it depends what tabs her hubby is on. I guess he has not yet been supplied with a meter for a reason, and if GP or endo was concerned, they would be ensuring he did his BN's regularly. In people with well controlled DM on just metformin with satisfactory BM's, random BM's here and there is not going to alter management; that is the role of HbA1c - if it were not at satisfactory levels, then they may introduce a BM machine and get the person to do recordings. People on exenatide are, as you know, fairly far down the line of T2DM and this is only introduced when the only other option is insulin and the person is overweight and yes indeed those on exenatide and insulin DO need to do regular BM recordings, as do certain other situations as outlined below.

My point is that your relatives on insulin and exenatide are far away from this person's simple likely metformin treatment, and those management is very different. Even so, the continuation of exenatide relies on a person's HbA1c and body weight falling over 6 months, so the regular BM's do not actually alter management anyway.
NICE guideline:

Self
-monitoring of plasma glucose should be available to those on insulin treatment, to those on oral glucose-lowering medications, to provide information on hypoglycaemia, to assess changes in glucose control resulting from medications and lifestyle changes, to
monitor changes during intercurrent illnesstoensure safety during activities, including driving




Please note metformin does NOT lower plasma glucose and does NOT cause hypoglycaemia.

DrJayDee86

My point is that your relatives on insulin and exenatide are far away … My point is that your relatives on insulin and exenatide are far away from this person's simple likely metformin treatment, and those management is very different. Even so, the continuation of exenatide relies on a person's HbA1c and body weight falling over 6 months, so the regular BM's do not actually alter management anyway.NICE guideline:Self-monitoring of plasma glucose should be available to those on insulin treatment, to those on oral glucose-lowering medications, to provide information on hypoglycaemia, to assess changes in glucose control resulting from medications and lifestyle changes, tomonitor changes during intercurrent illnesstoensure safety during activities, including drivingPlease note metformin does NOT lower plasma glucose and does NOT cause hypoglycaemia.



I don't know where your point comes from considering the poster in question stated in his initial reply that he's on injection therapy for his diabetes, just not insulin. In other words, he's probably on exenatide, thus his BMs require closer monitoring (as you have just stated in your reply). At no point did he say he was only taking oral medication. The opposite is true, in fact. As for my relatives; my dad went from being diagnosed with type 2 and put on a diet controlled therapy to metformin, then metformin and glicazide, then finally being put on exenatide within a year of initial diagnosis. That's how quickly diabetes can get worse. He's been on exenatide for 3 years now, with no substantial weight loss after the first 3 months, but his BMs are remaining steady.
Edited by: "Prufrock" 29th Oct 2013

Please note metformin does NOT.....cause hypoglycaemia.



It may not cause it but it certainly increases the chance of having a hypo (this is a confirmed side effect as stated in the paperwork that comes with the tablets). I was on normal release metformin and was getting hypos due to the tablets. Put on the slow release with the same diet, and not had any ill effects for months. The thing with diabetes is that its not a one size fits all illness. What meds/diet works for one person will not always work for another. For example, I was having hypos at normal blood sugar levels, which by all accounts "could never happen", but the tests proved otherwise.

I think that it is totally irresponsible for people to make claims like there have been in this thread due to the fact that everyone is different and will react differently. Even the medical staff, the ones who are supposed to know, know very little in my experiences and in a lot of cases are part of the cause of the incorrect information that is being given out to newly diagnosed patients.

My advice is to do your own research, take an active role in your own care and see what works and doesn't work for YOU.
Edited by: "Simon_G" 31st Oct 2013

Prufrock

Dude, lay off! The poster said he's on other injection therapy - i.e. … Dude, lay off! The poster said he's on other injection therapy - i.e. he's diabetic, and on injections, just not insulin! Who are you to judge if he needs the monitor? There are other injection therapies out there besides insulin, you know. You can be type 2 and be on injections (including insulin!). I guess the poster is on exenatide injections, which means his type 2 diabetes is quite bad and requires more intense monitoring.



dude chill

Thank you
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