Free Diabetes Awareness Necklaces
714°

Free Diabetes Awareness Necklaces

67
Found 12th Nov
Free Diabetes Necklace. Email or ring them. Details further down the web page. It does ask for a donation of £2 but it's not mandatory.

Top comments

I read that tag on the picture as saying "I HATE DIABETES!"

Yeah, I hate it too. it's shit.

penfold281 h, 20 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.

You couldn't be more wrong.
I (and many others) came away from any type of metal round my wrist, including the gold medic alert I had, for a forearm tattoo.
Not everyone with diabetes will be able to afford such things, so this type of thing, could save a life.
If it saved one single life, it would be MUCH more to the family associated than a cheap piece of metal.
Edited by: "burgyuk" 12th Nov

penfold2824 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.


And you know this because? As a first aid teacher one of the first things we teach is to check for ID or alerts, neck or other. Paramedics don’t necessarily check for medi alerts but the likelihood of being found by a paramedic is low.. being found by a first aider on the other hand..

Heat added OP

SixtyFive6 h, 54 m ago

Research into type 2 says eat less pre prepared meals & cook your …Research into type 2 says eat less pre prepared meals & cook your own...get some exercise & limit your carbohydrates. The majority of those with type 2 diabetes have it due to being overweight.



Problem is that with the jobs that we do these days, you may creep into type 2 without even realising it and then BANG! There's no way back. If you think 80+ kgs won't get you to type 2 then think again. I was 83kgs when diagnosed. Was even cycling to work and back twice a week. There was a programme on tele with Michael Mosely in it which explains "Thin on the Outside, Fat on the Inside" or TOFI, as many so called "thin" people were getting diabetes. The old understanding was that 80-90% of Type 2s are overweight. So just because you're are thin-ish doesn't mean you are not susceptible to Type 2. Check often. I think that modern diets don't help - absolutely no to pre-prepared meals.

See also: en.wikipedia.org/wik…OFI
67 Comments

That's awesome 👏
Ordered me one

Would this be for Diabetes 1 or type 2 ??? I know it says free, but they are trying to raise some funds

Original Poster

summerof764 m ago

Would this be for Diabetes 1 or type 2 ??? I know it says free, but they …Would this be for Diabetes 1 or type 2 ??? I know it says free, but they are trying to raise some funds


Hi,
sorry...I have no knowledge about that... why don't you email enquiries@drwf.org.uk or call 023 9263 7808.

Original Poster

thisisgiftx0x10 m ago

That's awesome 👏 Ordered me one


Also don't forget to fill in the emergency details on your phone that the emergency services can access.

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.

DealJourno4 m ago

I agree. Would only ever fund type 1 research.



Would you care to elaborate?

penfold2824 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.


And you know this because? As a first aid teacher one of the first things we teach is to check for ID or alerts, neck or other. Paramedics don’t necessarily check for medi alerts but the likelihood of being found by a paramedic is low.. being found by a first aider on the other hand..

Heat added OP

penfold2825 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.


This is HUKD - only price matters and free is even better!

I read that tag on the picture as saying "I HATE DIABETES!"

Yeah, I hate it too. it's shit.

Original Poster

cenedra1313 m ago

And you know this because? As a first aid teacher one of the first things …And you know this because? As a first aid teacher one of the first things we teach is to check for ID or alerts, neck or other. Paramedics don’t necessarily check for medi alerts but the likelihood of being found by a paramedic is low.. being found by a first aider on the other hand..Heat added OP


Hi,
Thanks for explaining others why it's nessesary....

DealJourno25 m ago

I agree. Would only ever fund type 1 research.


Why? Type 2 is by far the bigger (and ever growing) global healthcare burden. Better detection, treatments and prevention of harmful sequelae would save and/or improve many more lives. Arguably research into type 2 presents a much more attractive prospect of healthcare cost reduction. Correct me if I'm way off, but perhaps you feel that type 2 sufferers don't deserve research funding because it's 'self-inflicted'? I don't have diabetes by the way nor does anyone in my family that I know of, just happen to know a bit about it.

I happen to think a necklace like this is kinda pointless. If you're not in a state to tell a healthcare professional yourself that you're diabetic i.e. if you're having a severe hypo or in DKA and delirious, one of the first things anyone would do routinely is check your blood glucose! Unless perhaps you're demented or learning disabled and can't tell anyone in any situation that you're diabetic, in which case hopefully someone is looking after you at all times and already knows. Even then they would be checking for a wristband rather than a necklace. I suppose it can't do any harm though!

OK, monologue over.

Its kind of pointless. All medical staff are trained to take bloods in an emergency. Glucose testing is included!

penfold281 h, 20 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.

You couldn't be more wrong.
I (and many others) came away from any type of metal round my wrist, including the gold medic alert I had, for a forearm tattoo.
Not everyone with diabetes will be able to afford such things, so this type of thing, could save a life.
If it saved one single life, it would be MUCH more to the family associated than a cheap piece of metal.
Edited by: "burgyuk" 12th Nov

Pro Tip: Give to a loved one starting to look a little heavy as a subtle reminder that they might need to hit the gym. Remember to say "Not that you need it now, but I already got you something for Christmas."

cannibalwombat4 h, 24 m ago

Why? Type 2 is by far the bigger (and ever growing) global healthcare …Why? Type 2 is by far the bigger (and ever growing) global healthcare burden. Better detection, treatments and prevention of harmful sequelae would save and/or improve many more lives. Arguably research into type 2 presents a much more attractive prospect of healthcare cost reduction. Correct me if I'm way off, but perhaps you feel that type 2 sufferers don't deserve research funding because it's 'self-inflicted'? I don't have diabetes by the way nor does anyone in my family that I know of, just happen to know a bit about it.I happen to think a necklace like this is kinda pointless. If you're not in a state to tell a healthcare professional yourself that you're diabetic i.e. if you're having a severe hypo or in DKA and delirious, one of the first things anyone would do routinely is check your blood glucose! Unless perhaps you're demented or learning disabled and can't tell anyone in any situation that you're diabetic, in which case hopefully someone is looking after you at all times and already knows. Even then they would be checking for a wristband rather than a necklace. I suppose it can't do any harm though!OK, monologue over.



Type 2 diabetes is unrelated to type 1......Type two used to be called 'fat peoples' diabetes as it's your own fault if you get it....Type 1 is not.
Edited by: "SixtyFive" 13th Nov

oligreen15 m ago

Pro Tip: Give to a loved one starting to look a little heavy as a subtle …Pro Tip: Give to a loved one starting to look a little heavy as a subtle reminder that they might need to hit the gym. Remember to say "Not that you need it now, but I already got you something for Christmas."



or eat less & more green veg to fill.

penfold286 h, 36 m ago

Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on …Completely pointless. Anyone with a serious illness wears a medical tag on their wrist not some piece of cheap metal round their neck. How this has heat is beyond me.


My brother is type 1 diabetic and doesn't wear anything to say he's diabetic. I gave him a credit card thing to put in his wallet that says he's diabetic which I know is fairly pointless but if he's somewhere there's a firstaider who finds him and opens his wallet to look for his name/ID, they'll see it.

raschoudhury5 h, 36 m ago

Its kind of pointless. All medical staff are trained to take bloods in an …Its kind of pointless. All medical staff are trained to take bloods in an emergency. Glucose testing is included!



I think this is more for when diabetics who are hypo or hyper in public and are found by a member of the public who might think the diabetic person is drunk/on drugs/mentally ill etc because it can seem that way to someone who doesn't know the symptoms.

If someone was slumped over or comatose on the floor and this necklace was hanging out and seen, the member of the public who is looking after them can tell 999 etc and it can save time.


I think the medicalert bracelets are better, and don't think I'd automatically look at someone's necklace - plus this doesn't have the official medical snake sign - but it's not like it can do any harm at all to anyone!
Edited by: "sicklysweet" 13th Nov

ScroopEgerton4 h, 38 m ago

I read that tag on the picture as saying "I HATE DIABETES!"Yeah, I hate it …I read that tag on the picture as saying "I HATE DIABETES!"Yeah, I hate it too. it's shit.



I had type 1 but now after a transplant I no longer have diabetes......It's an unbelievably destructive illness as I know from my kidney/pancreas transplant....Let me tell you now.....ANYONE with type 1 try as hard as you can to control it.....We all know it's out to do us over from the inside.

SixtyFive19 m ago

Type 2 diabetes is unrelated to type 1......Type two used to be called …Type 2 diabetes is unrelated to type 1......Type two used to be called 'fat peoples' diabetes as it's your own fault if you get it....Type 1 is not.


I know the difference. Full disclosure: my 'self-inflicted' comment was not my view, just a cheeky straw man to try to make a point/spur debate.

They are related, in the sense that they're both disorders of glucose homeostasis. Not everyone with type 2 gets it because they're fat. Some people develop it secondary to medications (antipsychotics are particular culprits), some have a genetic predisposition, some even have a mixture of type 1 (insulin underproduction, usually autoimmune) and type 2 (insulin resistance).

My point was, irrespective of the cause(s) and people's prejudices, type 2 is by far the bigger healthcare burden. So even taking the purely utilitarian view, surely research into it is a good thing and should be supported? What do you think?
Edited by: "cannibalwombat" 13th Nov

cannibalwombat4 m ago

I know the difference. They are related, in the sense that they're both …I know the difference. They are related, in the sense that they're both disorders of glucose homeostasis. Not everyone with type 2 gets it because they're fat. Some people develop it secondary to medications (antipsychotics are particular culprits), some have a genetic predisposition, some even have a mixture of type 1 (insulin underproduction, usually autoimmune) and type 2 (insulin resistance). My point was, irrespective of the cause(s) and people's prejudices, type 2 is by far the bigger healthcare burden. So even taking the purely utilitarian view, surely research into it is a good thing and should be supported?



Research into type 2 says eat less pre prepared meals & cook your own...get some exercise & limit your carbohydrates. The majority of those with type 2 diabetes have it due to being overweight.

SixtyFive6 h, 54 m ago

Research into type 2 says eat less pre prepared meals & cook your …Research into type 2 says eat less pre prepared meals & cook your own...get some exercise & limit your carbohydrates. The majority of those with type 2 diabetes have it due to being overweight.



Problem is that with the jobs that we do these days, you may creep into type 2 without even realising it and then BANG! There's no way back. If you think 80+ kgs won't get you to type 2 then think again. I was 83kgs when diagnosed. Was even cycling to work and back twice a week. There was a programme on tele with Michael Mosely in it which explains "Thin on the Outside, Fat on the Inside" or TOFI, as many so called "thin" people were getting diabetes. The old understanding was that 80-90% of Type 2s are overweight. So just because you're are thin-ish doesn't mean you are not susceptible to Type 2. Check often. I think that modern diets don't help - absolutely no to pre-prepared meals.

See also: en.wikipedia.org/wik…OFI

Bogami2 h, 27 m ago

Problem is that with the jobs that we do these days, you may creep into …Problem is that with the jobs that we do these days, you may creep into type 2 without even realising it and then BANG! There's no way back. If you think 80+ kgs won't get you to type 2 then think again. I was 83kgs when diagnosed. Was even cycling to work and back twice a week. There was a programme on tele with Michael Mosely in it which explains "Thin on the Outside, Fat on the Inside" or TOFI, as many so called "thin" people were getting diabetes. The old understanding was that 80-90% of Type 2s are overweight. So just because you're are thin-ish doesn't mean you are not susceptible to Type 2. Check often. I think that modern diets don't help - absolutely no to pre-prepared meals. See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOFI


Spot on, my 52 year old dad was recently diagnosed with Type 2 and he’s as thin as a toothpick with a ‘pop’ belly.

He has a rare liver condition, but I believe it’s down to his poor food choices - he heaped sugar in tea and coffee, scoffed chocolate bars and other junk throughout the day and only had two or three proper home cooked meals a week.

The sad thing is, 5-6 weeks after diagnosis not much has changed, he’s one of the laziest people you will meet, he can’t be bothered to prepare his own meals for work and continues to buy McDonalds/KFC on lunch breaks, he signed up to a gym but has only been once and it has caused arguments every other day with myself, sister and mother.. he just cannot help himself and I fear he will end up dead soon.

I myself have made massive changes to my diet recently with cutting out meat and eating more plant based meals with the intention of going vegan one day as I felt I was heading down the path of diabetes too.

Why are so many people on here slating this? Its free what do you expect?
I'm diabetic and have ordered one.
I suppose the haters would like a gold or silver chain. Get a life folks free is free. Don't knock it.

Original Poster

oligreen13 h, 46 m ago

Pro Tip: Give to a loved one starting to look a little heavy as a subtle …Pro Tip: Give to a loved one starting to look a little heavy as a subtle reminder that they might need to hit the gym. Remember to say "Not that you need it now, but I already got you something for Christmas."


I've been type 1 for 45 years.
I wear a bright pink rubber bracelet which stands out and has saved me twice.
Anything that alerts help when you'having a HYPO is worth having.

BTW...Type 2 is reversible...plenty of people have reversed it and my ex diabetoligist (one of the world's leading diabetic specialists) Prof.Robert Taylor did a TV show about it earlier this year.

32426048-QI909.jpg32426048-lmCbD.jpg32426048-j2k6d.jpg

cannibalwombat14 h, 17 m ago

type 2 is by far the bigger healthcare burden.


I disagree. My wife has been diabetic for 40 years. She has an insulin pump that is replaced every 3 years at the cost of around £5k and accessories to change her pump every 2 days which per 10 come into serious money. That doesn't take into account the frequent consultant and diabetic specialist appointments and the medicine for her diabetic neuropathy and the surgeries and check ups for her diabetic retinopathy issues. I can't see how type 2 is a bigger burden but I do agree with a fair few of your other points.

nickann124 m ago

I disagree. My wife has been diabetic for 40 years. She has an insulin …I disagree. My wife has been diabetic for 40 years. She has an insulin pump that is replaced every 3 years at the cost of around £5k and accessories to change her pump every 2 days which per 10 come into serious money. That doesn't take into account the frequent consultant and diabetic specialist appointments and the medicine for her diabetic neuropathy and the surgeries and check ups for her diabetic retinopathy issues. I can't see how type 2 is a bigger burden but I do agree with a fair few of your other points.


Sorry for your wife's troubles. All the hassle associated with managing something that seems so simple (keeping blood sugar within a certain range) is such a burden over a lifetime. However it's a simple fact that type 2 is FAR more prevalent and burdensome, and carries with it much the same complications. About 90% of all diabetes in the UK is type 2. Those with type 1 certainly tend to get more specialist input earlier, particularly as many are diagnosed as children (and we as a country spend massively on paediatric healthcare vs e.g. older adults) but as a result they also get generally better care (including education and a degree of pastoral support) and aren't left undiagnosed/untreated to descend into organ damage. Indeed an estimated 50% of those with type 2 are undiagnosed. These people can also end up on insulin, in specialist clinics, and the end organ damage follows a similar pattern (kidneys, eyes, feet, heart and liver to an extent). About £10 billion a year is spent on diabetes management, roughly £9 billion of that on type 2. You don't even need to do the maths, I've done it for you!

SixtyFive15 h, 41 m ago

Type 2 diabetes is unrelated to type 1......Type two used to be called …Type 2 diabetes is unrelated to type 1......Type two used to be called 'fat peoples' diabetes as it's your own fault if you get it....Type 1 is not.


You CAN get type 2 without being overweight!!! Do some research and don't insult people like me who have type 2! Those with Type 1 don't always help themselves. Two in my family with Type 1 have eaten or drunk the wrong things and had their diabetes run out of control.

cannibalwombat48 m ago

Sorry for your wife's troubles. All the hassle associated with managing …Sorry for your wife's troubles. All the hassle associated with managing something that seems so simple (keeping blood sugar within a certain range) is such a burden over a lifetime. However it's a simple fact that type 2 is FAR more prevalent and burdensome, and carries with it much the same complications. About 90% of all diabetes in the UK is type 2. Those with type 1 certainly tend to get more specialist input earlier, particularly as many are diagnosed as children (and we as a country spend massively on paediatric healthcare vs e.g. older adults) but as a result they also get generally better care (including education and a degree of pastoral support) and aren't left undiagnosed/untreated to descend into organ damage. Indeed an estimated 50% of those with type 2 are undiagnosed. These people can also end up on insulin, in specialist clinics, and the end organ damage follows a similar pattern (kidneys, eyes, feet, heart and liver to an extent). About £10 billion a year is spent on diabetes management, roughly £9 billion of that on type 2. You don't even need to do the maths, I've done it for you!


I know of someone with Type 2 who had to stay in hospital with something unrelated to diabetes. They were told she couldn't possibly be having a hypo with type 2 and didn't need food. Wasn't until she did a blood test and showed a 4.6 result to the nurse that they got her something! And that was a medically trained nurse.

Spookirules21 m ago

You CAN get type 2 without being overweight!!! Do some research and don't …You CAN get type 2 without being overweight!!! Do some research and don't insult people like me who have type 2! Those with Type 1 don't always help themselves. Two in my family with Type 1 have eaten or drunk the wrong things and had their diabetes run out of control.



Any 'normal' person CANNOT get type 2 diabetes unless they are classed as overweight. Most claim they had something wrong with their glands...The only gland they have trouble with it their mouths being unable to close & stop eating. If you have type 2 & consider yourself normal then you have been overweight. Being overweight does not mean you look like Billy or Bessie bunter. I have done almost 50 years of research having had type one diabetes for that time. Please do not try to teach your grandfather how to suck eggs.

Spookirules19 m ago

I know of someone with Type 2 who had to stay in hospital with something …I know of someone with Type 2 who had to stay in hospital with something unrelated to diabetes. They were told she couldn't possibly be having a hypo with type 2 and didn't need food. Wasn't until she did a blood test and showed a 4.6 result to the nurse that they got her something! And that was a medically trained nurse.



4.6 is NOT considered hypo. Anything below that is.

cannibalwombat1 h, 12 m ago

Sorry for your wife's troubles. All the hassle associated with managing …Sorry for your wife's troubles. All the hassle associated with managing something that seems so simple (keeping blood sugar within a certain range) is such a burden over a lifetime. However it's a simple fact that type 2 is FAR more prevalent and burdensome, and carries with it much the same complications. About 90% of all diabetes in the UK is type 2. Those with type 1 certainly tend to get more specialist input earlier, particularly as many are diagnosed as children (and we as a country spend massively on paediatric healthcare vs e.g. older adults) but as a result they also get generally better care (including education and a degree of pastoral support) and aren't left undiagnosed/untreated to descend into organ damage. Indeed an estimated 50% of those with type 2 are undiagnosed. These people can also end up on insulin, in specialist clinics, and the end organ damage follows a similar pattern (kidneys, eyes, feet, heart and liver to an extent). About £10 billion a year is spent on diabetes management, roughly £9 billion of that on type 2. You don't even need to do the maths, I've done it for you!



There is one BIG difference.....Type 1's get offered transplants & type 2 don't generally get given them as it's their own fault they have type 2 which is self induced due to being unable to control their food intake....They are the primary reason we have to have a 'nanny state' limiting the size of portions & reducing their size. Self control is the key with diabetes & it's lacking in the majority of type 2 prone individuals. Harsh but true.

buckm2 h, 8 m ago

I've been type 1 for 45 years.I wear a bright pink rubber bracelet which …I've been type 1 for 45 years.I wear a bright pink rubber bracelet which stands out and has saved me twice.Anything that alerts help when you'having a HYPO is worth having.BTW...Type 2 is reversible...plenty of people have reversed it and my ex diabetoligist (one of the world's leading diabetic specialists) Prof.Robert Taylor did a TV show about it earlier this year.[Image] [Image] [Image]



Yep type 2 is reversible unlike our type. Type 2 is self induced. I think of them as lesser diabetics with no self control

SixtyFive41 m ago

There is one BIG difference.....Type 1's get offered transplants & type 2 …There is one BIG difference.....Type 1's get offered transplants & type 2 don't generally get given them as it's their own fault they have type 2 which is self induced due to being unable to control their food intake....They are the primary reason we have to have a 'nanny state' limiting the size of portions & reducing their size. Self control is the key with diabetes & it's lacking in the majority of type 2 prone individuals. Harsh but true.


For someone who's done "50 years of research" on this subject (surely you'd be verging on professor territory?), you come across as rather reductionist and, may I say, pretty ignorant.

Type 1s get offered transplants (or at least some do because organs are in short supply, but that's another debate) because THEIR PANCREAS DOESN'T WORK! Type 2s generally have a (to some degree) functional pancreas, but peripheral insulin resistance is a much bigger part of the problem. Though it is more complicated than that. It is simply false to say that type 2s are denied pancreas transplants because it's 'self-inflicted'. Utter nonsense.

Also, to say that you CANNOT get diabetes without being overweight is, again, just wrong. I've already given the example of medications (particularly antipsychotics) having a well-established causative link. Top tip: when considering aetiological factors, 'always' and 'never' are very rarely sensible positions!

Pre-diabetes necklace.
32427253-lLh2R.jpg

MoogleV32 m ago

Pre-diabetes necklace.[Image]


A diabecklace.

cannibalwombat1 h, 14 m ago

For someone who's done "50 years of research" on this subject (surely …For someone who's done "50 years of research" on this subject (surely you'd be verging on professor territory?), you come across as rather reductionist and, may I say, pretty ignorant.Type 1s get offered transplants (or at least some do because organs are in short supply, but that's another debate) because THEIR PANCREAS DOESN'T WORK! Type 2s generally have a (to some degree) functional pancreas, but peripheral insulin resistance is a much bigger part of the problem. Though it is more complicated than that. It is simply false to say that type 2s are denied pancreas transplants because it's 'self-inflicted'. Utter nonsense. Also, to say that you CANNOT get diabetes without being overweight is, again, just wrong. I've already given the example of medications (particularly antipsychotics) having a well-established causative link. Top tip: when considering aetiological factors, 'always' and 'never' are very rarely sensible positions!



I am a confirmed expert in type 1 diabetes because I have it. The majority of type 2 diabetics have no will power & that's why they are type 2. They nearly always get angry when told it's self induced & look for any excuse to find a different reason for them having type 2 but there is not one. If you have type 2 then you bought it on yourself & it's pointless you raging at others for your lack of will power.
Just sayin'

SixtyFive10 m ago

I am a confirmed expert in type 1 diabetes because I have it. The majority …I am a confirmed expert in type 1 diabetes because I have it. The majority of type 2 diabetics have no will power & that's why they are type 2. They nearly always get angry when told it's self induced & look for any excuse to find a different reason for them having type 2 but there is not one. If you have type 2 then you bought it on yourself & it's pointless you raging at others for your lack of will power.Just sayin'


I pay taxes, does that make me a tax lawyer? I also drive a car, so I'm a mechanic too! I suppose the fact that I live in a house also makes me an architect.

cannibalwombat9 m ago

I pay taxes, does that make me a tax lawyer? I also drive a car, so I'm a …I pay taxes, does that make me a tax lawyer? I also drive a car, so I'm a mechanic too! I suppose the fact that I live in a house also makes me an architect.



If you cannot control what you eat then it's your own problem. Don't rage at me for your lack of control over your health. It's your own fault but luckily the 'nanny state' will make sure your portion size is restricted on the ready meals you buy.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text