Free DSD vs FLAC vs WAV audio sampler
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Free DSD vs FLAC vs WAV audio sampler

2
Found 15th Nov 2016
Free download (2.6Gb) of 3 tracks in high resolution- DSD, FLAC and WAV.

All you need is to fill in the form with your name & email + a friend's name & email.

Tracks are:
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings in C Op 48 Waltz - Moderato Tempo di Valse

Ludwig van Beethoven Piano Sonata No 23 in F minor Op 57 Appassionata Allegro ma non troppo

Franz Xaver Richter Sinfonia a Quattro in B flat Andante

Going to load all on my DAP and compare - on my computer the DSD format is downsampled to 192kHz due to hardware limit.

Good luck!

2 Comments

Their website is a disaster; too many broken links and not enough detailed information about the recordings: Cross-Pair, Direct To Disk, etc., If they want their remasters to be taken seriously they need to provide potential customers with the information required to determine if spending money on their productions is worthwhile. Most of the works they are offering for sale can be got far cheaper elsewhere. Decca produced some of the finest orchestral recordings ever, while all later Deutsche Grammophon recordings were bastardised by Karajan's constant edits and re-edits. Any half decent replaying equipment will instantly reveal all the Dolby induced compressive effects that accompanied DG recorded performances with HvK as conductor.

Early - mid 20.th Century recordings of orchestral works are amongst the best ever produced. It was a golden age when members of an orchestra displayed total deference to the conductor. These are recordings in which the orchestras can be heard to work their magic. Most modern recordings of classic orchestral works (Karajan leading the fray) are subject to the whims of lead soloists who insist they are heard above all else. When I attend concerts now (actually I stopped wasting my money around 15 years ago) there is hardly a glance made toward the conductor, each musician seems hell-bent on working their own interpretation into the piece; the sum is no longer the performance objective.

If you like classical works, you owe it to yourself to try and obtain Decca or EMI recordings from the 40's, 50's and 60's; a time when the most fabulous orchestral works were captured for posterity.

Original Poster

Thanks for the insight! I recently started to look for Classical music records, will focus on Decca and EMI then!

Cheers-



loiterer

Their website is a disaster; too many broken links and not enough … Their website is a disaster; too many broken links and not enough detailed information about the recordings: Cross-Pair, Direct To Disk, etc., If they want their remasters to be taken seriously they need to provide potential customers with the information required to determine if spending money on their productions is worthwhile. Most of the works they are offering for sale can be got far cheaper elsewhere. Decca produced some of the finest orchestral recordings ever, while all later Deutsche Grammophon recordings were bastardised by Karajan's constant edits and re-edits. Any half decent replaying equipment will instantly reveal all the Dolby induced compressive effects that accompanied DG recorded performances with HvK as conductor.Early - mid 20.th Century recordings of orchestral works are amongst the best ever produced. It was a golden age when members of an orchestra displayed total deference to the conductor. These are recordings in which the orchestras can be heard to work their magic. Most modern recordings of classic orchestral works (Karajan leading the fray) are subject to the whims of lead soloists who insist they are heard above all else. When I attend concerts now (actually I stopped wasting my money around 15 years ago) there is hardly a glance made toward the conductor, each musician seems hell-bent on working their own interpretation into the piece; the sum is no longer the performance objective.If you like classical works, you owe it to yourself to try and obtain Decca or EMI recordings from the 40's, 50's and 60's; a time when the most fabulous orchestral works were captured for posterity.


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