Free Food For Christmas for food banks when you buy a voucher @ Ocado
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Free Food For Christmas for food banks when you buy a voucher @ Ocado

54
Found 11th Nov
Free food for foodbanks (sort of)...

If you buy a voucher via Ocado for a food bank donation they will double it and donate whatever food the foodbank wants. So if you buy a £5 voucher they will donate another £5 worth of food free.

Come on people with just six weeks to Christmas this is the deal to make hot not a 5p tin of beans that may not even be available nationally!

Subject to Ocado's usual home shopping rules but for those putting in an order anyway, you know you want to.

Edit to add terms from Ocado to answer some questions and doubts being raised here:

You give money, we give food. For every pound you give, we'll give at least two pounds' worth of groceries to food banks. So your donation counts for double or more.

Our food bank partners won't just be given boundless baked beans or piles of potatoes. Instead we'll give them exactly what's on their list, whether it be fresh veg, tea bags, or loaves of bread.

Here's how it works:

1. Choose how much you'd like to donate: £2.50, £5, or £10.

2. Add your donation to your trolley, do your weekly shop and check out as usual.

3. We'll match the value of the donation, by the same amount or more, and give products worth the total amount to food banks.

Top comments

Crazy to even think we need food banks in a first world country... Wow.

Fekin tax dodgers.

Im really glad this Post didn't turn out to be what I thought it was when I saw the Tittle, I was about to hit the Roof, yep, you guessed it, I was thinking some Idiot has posted up how to get Free Food from a Christmas Food Bank Charity.

I really relieved, what great Post to help those in need, well done OP, and yes done, keep up the good work, HOT.

I recently gave a lift to my neighbour to the local food bank, who regularly collects dry food and tins nearly every week. I spoke to the lady running the scheme in the church, she informed me that no one donates fresh produce, so I took it upon myself to see what I could do. I went with my son to the local market and spoke to several stall holders, asking them what they did with fruit and vegetables that don't sell, I asked them if they would be able donate to the food bank which is run in the local church. This seemed strange to some, as I'm a muslim woman wearing a headscarf. However, I'm not hindered, the response was overwhelming, now I personally go to the market every week park my car in the middle of the market and they fill it up to the max, I go and deliver it to the church. I was also invited to see the soup kitchen and how they distributed the food. They also took that idea and spoke to other food banks who could approach their local fruit and vegetables shops and stalls

For people on here who just judge others, please go and see for yourself! There were a couple of junkies, but the rest of them were good people (even junkies deserve to eat). Try to actually get involved rather than judging

jaydeeuk113 h, 43 m ago

Brothers old neighbours use food banks in Derby (lived on same road as the …Brothers old neighbours use food banks in Derby (lived on same road as the infamous philpot ). He's moved since though. He says most had sky sub, all smoke dope and drink and the 2 either side of him were rocking iPhone sixes on contract.There probably is a sizeable minority who are desperate (although our benefit system is incredibly generous) but a large number take the p*ss. They really are laughing at you.


You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working poor, disabled and unemployed. I just hope you don't need it one day.
54 Comments

Done thanks good find

Great idea though I can't see any way to donate without ordering a shop. A pity really.

mrty3 m ago

Great idea though I can't see any way to donate without ordering a shop. A …Great idea though I can't see any way to donate without ordering a shop. A pity really.



If you didn't have to order from their shop, it would be far too costly for Ocado. They can make some of their money back via their usual profits from your online shop. Otherwise they are hemorrhaging money. This way they get good Public Relations, Some more orders, and 'do their bit for the community'. Even the UK government only doubles public donations up to a set amount, and only in very rare circumstances. Expecting a private company to do it, when the private company isn't getting any sales at the same time, is a bit too far.

I still think it's a great initiative though!
Edited by: "Firefly1" 11th Nov

Great post

Im really glad this Post didn't turn out to be what I thought it was when I saw the Tittle, I was about to hit the Roof, yep, you guessed it, I was thinking some Idiot has posted up how to get Free Food from a Christmas Food Bank Charity.

I really relieved, what great Post to help those in need, well done OP, and yes done, keep up the good work, HOT.

Crazy to even think we need food banks in a first world country... Wow.

Fekin tax dodgers.

Love this, and voting it hot, of course!

But just pointing out, because it has never been particulary visible on the Ocado website, that it isn't ONLY a Christmas scheme. It's been running a few years and is available year-round. Blog article here:
blog.ocado.com/201…how

The giving season is the perfect time for a valuable reminder, so thank you, OP, most sincerely.

No thanks.

I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless war veterans, living on the streets in Central London.
Edited by: "TheLondonFella" 12th Nov

TheLondonFella12 m ago

No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless …No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless vets, living on the streets in Central London.



What, you don't think these people use food banks as well? I agree though that it's better to go straight to the source if possible, rather than line the pockets of the capitalist scum. It sickens me when I see these collecting boxes for food for causes like this in supermarkets. They see no shame in profiting from people's misfortune.

Great idea!

Firefly13 h, 32 m ago

If you didn't have to order from their shop, it would be far too costly …If you didn't have to order from their shop, it would be far too costly for Ocado. They can make some of their money back via their usual profits from your online shop. Otherwise they are hemorrhaging money. This way they get good Public Relations, Some more orders, and 'do their bit for the community'. Even the UK government only doubles public donations up to a set amount, and only in very rare circumstances. Expecting a private company to do it, when the private company isn't getting any sales at the same time, is a bit too far.I still think it's a great initiative though!


Except that it doesn’t really cost them £5. They have much lower volumes of food past at best to dispose of than a normal supermarket. But they still have to throw food away. Instead, they donate it. Granted there’s still a limit. But for the most part this won’t cost Ocado anything.

ec9wrr43 m ago

Except that it doesn’t really cost them £5. They have much lower volumes of …Except that it doesn’t really cost them £5. They have much lower volumes of food past at best to dispose of than a normal supermarket. But they still have to throw food away. Instead, they donate it. Granted there’s still a limit. But for the most part this won’t cost Ocado anything.



The food banks can ask for any food that they want - not whatever food is already past its best before date. This is a big difference to a current supermarket donating food that has gone past its best before date. Food banks often want long-life food, especially tinned/canned products, that will not have gone past their best before date. Ocado really will not have that much long-life products going past its best before date, since - unlike individual supermarkets - they ship purely from warehouses that will have better date-control than any shop floor.

Say pasta for example. They might sell 1,000 packets of pasta per week from an individual warehouse. They are never going to find pasta that has gone past its best-before date, as they'll simply reduce their buying volume months in advance. It's much easier to control this from a shipping warehouse as opposed to a shop floor. Staff shacking shelves in Tesco's might put all the new pasta in front of all the old pasta, so the oldest pasta in the store never sells. An individual Tesco supermarket relies on the staff in that individual store -- Many more staff involved, leading to poorer processes.

Not sure if I've explained it clearly enough, apologises if you still don't get it. If this were to Tesco on a purely local basis (and that Tesco donating whatever food it wants), I would agree with you to a certain extent - not Ocado.

On the other hand, it wont actually cost Ocado £5 because the food that they sell for £5 might only be bought by themselves for circa £1-£2 before being marked up to £5.

I also seriously doubt that, for this specific 'Deal', Ocado will use any food that has gone past its "Best Before" Date. Customers of Ocado would expect their money to be providing food that has not expired in any way (Including past the Best Before Date).
Edited by: "Firefly1" 11th Nov

how many people that use food banks are in that position because of their bad choices such as drugs!!!!!!
One that lives a few doors from me can't manage one hour per week to deliver local free papers that would put money in her pocket, cash , can routinely manage to walk at least as far to the main shops to buy the smallest most expensive items from small shops such as one stop,

Some places - eg. ShareShop in Chester - help the homeless and you can donate to pay for coffees, sandwiches etc which are then given to those living on the streets. Agree they shouldn't be needed but it's a sad reflection of how vulnerable and in need of support many people are so, imo. the more companies and the general public can help the better

Brothers old neighbours use food banks in Derby (lived on same road as the infamous philpot ). He's moved since though.
He says most had sky sub, all smoke dope and drink and the 2 either side of him were rocking iPhone sixes on contract.

There probably is a sizeable minority who are desperate (although our benefit system is incredibly generous) but a large number take the p*ss. They really are laughing at you.

There are suspended coffee schemes etc all over the country.

I always buy an extra item on every visit to the supermarket to put in the collection crate by the exit.

Wouldn't give money to any person on the street, as there are so many scammers living well off it or just spending it on an addiction. If they ask for money for food, offer to buy the food - quite a few of them are suddenly not interested.

Fantastic ..... will do

ZeroEx3 h, 32 m ago

Crazy to even think we need food banks in a first world country... …Crazy to even think we need food banks in a first world country... Wow.Fekin tax dodgers.

Indeed. And those who are capable to, but can't be bothered working.

kolibri7 m ago

Indeed. And those who are capable to, but can't be bothered working.

Oh of course. And the even worse ones - the ones who work and claim JSA.

Firefly12 h, 13 m ago

The food banks can ask for any food that they want - not whatever food is …The food banks can ask for any food that they want - not whatever food is already past its best before date. This is a big difference to a current supermarket donating food that has gone past its best before date. Food banks often want long-life food, especially tinned/canned products, that will not have gone past their best before date. Ocado really will not have that much long-life products going past its best before date, since - unlike individual supermarkets - they ship purely from warehouses that will have better date-control than any shop floor.Say pasta for example. They might sell 1,000 packets of pasta per week from an individual warehouse. They are never going to find pasta that has gone past its best-before date, as they'll simply reduce their buying volume months in advance. It's much easier to control this from a shipping warehouse as opposed to a shop floor. Staff shacking shelves in Tesco's might put all the new pasta in front of all the old pasta, so the oldest pasta in the store never sells. An individual Tesco supermarket relies on the staff in that individual store -- Many more staff involved, leading to poorer processes.Not sure if I've explained it clearly enough, apologises if you still don't get it. If this were to Tesco on a purely local basis (and that Tesco donating whatever food it wants), I would agree with you to a certain extent - not Ocado.On the other hand, it wont actually cost Ocado £5 because the food that they sell for £5 might only be bought by themselves for circa £1-£2 before being marked up to £5.I also seriously doubt that, for this specific 'Deal', Ocado will use any food that has gone past its "Best Before" Date. Customers of Ocado would expect their money to be providing food that has not expired in any way (Including past the Best Before Date).


I get it.
But no where does it state that they do that. Unless you know they do?
My point is less complicated. In their accounts they mention that they donate food. But they don’t mention what food. Later they indicate their waste is far lower than a traditional supermarket. I’m just joining the dots. Maybe incorrectly!
It doesn’t matter though. All donations are good.
The stock holding is also significantly less than the traditional supermarket as a ratio of sales as well which should reduce their surplus.
Even still, they will definitely have surplus and charitable giving seems a great way to use it. I’m not knocking them, just trying to shed some light on maybe part of the way it’s donated. I believe the surplus is very low single digits as a percentage. I seem to remember reading less than 1%? But if you think of how many people will actually click the add a donation to their order this small % may cover a lot of any donations (if Ocado wanted it to).

There isn’t a gross profit margin in food anywhere near the numbers you mention by the way.
Edited by: "ec9wrr" 11th Nov

ec9wrr15 m ago

I get it.But no where does it state that they do that. Unless you know …I get it.But no where does it state that they do that. Unless you know they do? My point is less complicated. In their accounts they mention that they donate food. But they don’t mention what food. Later they indicate their waste is far lower than a traditional supermarket. I’m just joining the dots. Maybe incorrectly!It doesn’t matter though. All donations are good. The stock holding is also significantly less than the traditional supermarket as a ratio of sales as well which should reduce their surplus. Even still, they will definitely have surplus and charitable giving seems a great way to use it. I’m not knocking them, just trying to shed some light on maybe part of the way it’s donated. I believe the surplus is very low single digits as a percentage. I seem to remember reading less than 1%? But if you think of how many people will actually click the add a donation to their order this small % may cover a lot of any donations (if Ocado wanted it to).There isn’t a gross profit margin in food anywhere near the numbers you mention by the way.




You say they don't mention what food?

The OP clearly states: "If you buy a voucher via Ocado for a food bank donation they will double it and donate whatever food the foodbank wants". On any given today, we are both in agreement (I think!) that there will be only be a limited amount of food past its best before date.


Most of this food, that the food bank places an order for, will not co-incidentally be the food that is past its best before date.

Also, the food banks are paying full price for the food in this deal.... Albeit thanks to the generosity of Ocado customers & Ocado themselves. They are not going to be sold out of date food.

They no doubt donate food as well, but that is completely seperate to this deal.
Edited by: "Firefly1" 11th Nov

Just an idea, but donate food yourself?

Firefly129 m ago

You say they don't mention what food?The OP clearly states: "If you buy a …You say they don't mention what food?The OP clearly states: "If you buy a voucher via Ocado for a food bank donation they will double it and donate whatever food the foodbank wants". On any given today, we are both in agreement (I think!) that there will be only be a limited amount of food past its best before date.Most of this food, that the food bank places an order for, will not co-incidentally be the food that is past its best before date.Also, the food banks are paying full price for the food in this deal.... Albeit thanks to the generosity of Ocado customers & Ocado themselves. They are not going to be sold out of date food. They no doubt donate food as well, but that is completely seperate to this deal.


I agree with you. Although surplus isn’t the same as food vast it’s best before or food past it’s best. Surplus can be identified much earlier than that.

TheLondonFella5 h, 28 m ago

No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless …No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless vets, living on the streets in Central London.


When our cat fell ill, it cost a bloody fortune just for a 10min consultancy and some tablets, there's no way any vets should be on the streets with those fees!!!!

Original Poster

thomasleep1 h, 47 m ago

Just an idea, but donate food yourself?



You do get the point that this doubles the donation don't you?

It is not double the donation, it is a tax right off for the people who make food banks a necessity in the first place.

Original Poster

thomasleep4 m ago

It is not double the donation, it is a tax right off for the people who …It is not double the donation, it is a tax right off for the people who make food banks a necessity in the first place.



Get back under the bridge.

Azureus1 m ago

Get back under the bridge.


and mute the lovely person who just keeps on drooooooooooooooooooning on

congrevecv5 h, 16 m ago

how many people that use food banks are in that position because of their …how many people that use food banks are in that position because of their bad choices such as drugs!!!!!!One that lives a few doors from me can't manage one hour per week to deliver local free papers that would put money in her pocket, cash , can routinely manage to walk at least as far to the main shops to buy the smallest most expensive items from small shops such as one stop,


Well one day you may well be in that position .I remember in the eighties in London near the Festival Hall people coming out of the car parks from sleeping rough with briefcases going to work .No-one knows their future unless you are so arrogant you can control fate .There are always bad examples ,some rich people pay their taxes others avoid it why ,that,s humanity !

Can remember giving to money to some old tramps in London and those with me said your mad they will only go and spend it on alcohol and drugs ,I replied well thats exactly what we are going to spend our money on as well but at least we do not have to sleep on cardboard in the freezing cold , it will at least give them a little pleasure in their lives .They all agreed !

That's brilliant, it's nice to see a company giving something back to the community...... even though the government should be doing more for the country it's running, charity is supposed to start at home after all.

jaydeeuk113 h, 43 m ago

Brothers old neighbours use food banks in Derby (lived on same road as the …Brothers old neighbours use food banks in Derby (lived on same road as the infamous philpot ). He's moved since though. He says most had sky sub, all smoke dope and drink and the 2 either side of him were rocking iPhone sixes on contract.There probably is a sizeable minority who are desperate (although our benefit system is incredibly generous) but a large number take the p*ss. They really are laughing at you.


You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working poor, disabled and unemployed. I just hope you don't need it one day.

3scoops1 h, 39 m ago

You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working …You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working poor, disabled and unemployed. I just hope you don't need it one day.


Hi, as a Chinese who lives in UK, I really think UK's benefit system is too generous (I lived in sweden before and their benefit system is even more generous). You have NHS, free education before university, child benefit and people indeed can survive without a job.
The problem is that nothing is really free, NHS, education and benefits all cost money. The hidden cost to provide all these are huge. The ugly truth is that no one really like to pay taxes.

3scoops2 h, 7 m ago

You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working …You really think our benefits system is generous? Tell that to the working poor, disabled and unemployed. I just hope you don't need it one day.


Yup. Look on a benefits calculator for a non working family with a kid, where one parent has a disability preventing them from working, lives in a council house here in Derby at £600 a month and other partner cares for them. In universal credit alone that's £16500, total benefits £18775. Considering a lot of people can spend up to £5000 a year just commuting to work that's hardly a pittance. For a safety net covering millions of people where cash is also spread thinly on NHS and schools that's pretty damm decent.

I suppose it doesn't matter how much people get in benefits, it'll never be enough.

As I understand it, the welfare system is generous if you have children in particular or a condition that you can exploit, in that many conditions are unpredictable making work difficult

TheLondonFella18 h, 4 m ago

No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless …No thanks.I'd rather give my money to one of the hundreds of homeless vets, living on the streets in Central London.


I know, it's crazy. With the number of sick and injured animals, you'd think there would be jobs available.

5p tin of beans
Have you got a link to this deal I well interested..

My only experience of people who use food banks are drug addicts who from what I have seen have more money than I do working full time. One week at the food bank then the following week a night in a posh hotel by the sea, they have expensive trainers on, run a car, smoke weed and take heroin, I could go on, so that’s why I won’t give to food banks!

Mallow22 h, 7 m ago

I'm embarrassed to admit we are struggling at the moment and unfortunately …I'm embarrassed to admit we are struggling at the moment and unfortunately so is the food bank.We don't smoke, drink or take drugs and have no children.But circumstances that I don't want made public have forced us down this food bank road.So please don't judge everyone and I hope that even though there may be no presents this Christmas that everyone will be able to eat, even if it's a pot noodle from a food bank.



Sad that there is so nuch need in the country and even sadder that so many people lack empathy and think it is self inflicted - they need to get in the real world and realise that hard times can afflict anyone. Hope things improve for you soon. xx

surfbabe1056 m ago

My only experience of people who use food banks are drug addicts who from …My only experience of people who use food banks are drug addicts who from what I have seen have more money than I do working full time. One week at the food bank then the following week a night in a posh hotel by the sea, they have expensive trainers on, run a car, smoke weed and take heroin, I could go on, so that’s why I won’t give to food banks!



What experience do you have as I have never seen that ?
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