Free lump of coal at Lidl McAlpine Road Dundee for first footing
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Free lump of coal at Lidl McAlpine Road Dundee for first footing

65
Found 31st Dec 2017Edited by:"cheekyweegit"
Hi folks,

Not sure if this is national, but on the packing shelves at the Lidl store above is a bag of coal and freezer bags to put them in which you can help yourself to.

Thought this was a lovely gesture and they are not limiting it to to tall, dark and handsome men either.

Not sure if it's national or the time they close tonight but if your passing and looking for a novel first foot it's worth it to pop in.

You could even pop by and get a couple of bits to put away for next year for those naughty children who are not getting presents from Santa Claus.

PS Happy New Year everyone and "lang may yer lum reek!"
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Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first footing' as I had no idea what you're on about. Never heard of this before.
Edited by: "Nealio" 31st Dec 2017
Original Poster
Nealio3 m ago

Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first-foot' as I had no idea what …Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first-foot' as I had no idea what you're on about. Never heard of this before.



It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house you are visiting for the first time after the new year, usually just after midnight to bring luck.

Never even thought about it just being Scottish so thanks for bringing that to my and others attention.
A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when first footing, to ensure the person they are visiting will always have something to eat, drink and keep them warm for the coming year
Honestly had to look up first footing. I thought you were saying the store has just open and first people through the door get a lump of coal!
65 Comments
Clause?
Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first footing' as I had no idea what you're on about. Never heard of this before.
Edited by: "Nealio" 31st Dec 2017
Original Poster
Nealio3 m ago

Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first-foot' as I had no idea what …Being a southerner, I had to look up 'first-foot' as I had no idea what you're on about. Never heard of this before.



It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house you are visiting for the first time after the new year, usually just after midnight to bring luck.

Never even thought about it just being Scottish so thanks for bringing that to my and others attention.
Original Poster
m5rcc7 m ago

Clause?



Edited just for you
cheekyweegit2 m ago

It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house …It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house you are visiting for the first time after the new year, usually just after midnight to bring luck. Never even thought about it just being Scottish so thanks for bringing that to my and others attention.


Also you take some black bun & a drink of something . Usually whisky.
Old Yorkshire Rhyme

Chuck Chuck Chuck
If you don't let me in I'll bring you bad luck
I was the first to ever come here
To wish you good luck and a Happy New Year....

First footers are always given a coin after blessing the house
Or they do around where I live or it's a brick through the window....nice
A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when first footing, to ensure the person they are visiting will always have something to eat, drink and keep them warm for the coming year
cheekyweegit4 m ago

Edited just for you


Clearly not far enough: Santa doesn't exist.

Besides, what is the deal?
Honestly had to look up first footing. I thought you were saying the store has just open and first people through the door get a lump of coal!
Original Poster
gavhtid4 m ago

Honestly had to look up first footing. I thought you were saying the store …Honestly had to look up first footing. I thought you were saying the store has just open and first people through the door get a lump of coal!



It's funny I never in a million years (midnight starting the new one) thought about the north / south divide. It's great seeing the other little bits coming out too.

I don't do the black bun, but do shortbread instead and something to drink too.
I came across this to, and thought how lovely it was, I took one but now wish I had taken a couple more, there was three black pails of it when I was in.
(Good idea on the Santa thing even if it was for an adult)
I was once waylaid (far south from Scotland) to be the first foot for strangers, although they had to give me the items to take in. My wife says I should have had salt and whisky, or at least water - that your house may always have food, drink and warmth. The custom is not unknown in the south, although maybe it's only those of Scottish descent.
Must be clearing all of the Christmas stock all of the children around Dundee must have been good this year
Never heard of this, just asked my Yorkshire wife and she hasn't either! Nice to hear other traditions.
First footing takes me back to when everyone’s door was open on NYE and everyone used to go to their neighbours for a drink and a nibble. Not sure if it was everywhere but I remember it in 80’s Newcastle
Edited by: "diddly08" 31st Dec 2017
Satan_Claws16 m ago

Never heard of this, just asked my Yorkshire wife and she hasn't either! …Never heard of this, just asked my Yorkshire wife and she hasn't either! Nice to hear other traditions.



It's traditional in NI to chuck these over the peace lines at midnight as a gift to your neighbours of a different religion although it's also tradition to hold onto your coal (or more commonly bricks) until July 11th.
Back in the 70s in Glasgow as a young child with black hair i would be given a lump of coal and sent to stand outside the house door about 5 mins before 00:00, then i would come in as the bells struck and be the houses firstfooter, and it was a very important thing at the time, and i have very fond memories of it because i can remember the house full of my parents, my grandparents and even my great grandparents as well, great memories of new years eve and night from that time.

I am sure there are many others who did the same thing around the same time, but it kind of lost it's thing as the older generation passed on, just one of those things i guess.
Edited by: "XP200" 31st Dec 2017
This Welshman has never heard of it either!
First Footing was still very commonly followed when I was a kid in the North East, but think it has become much less common as the years go on. Been too far south for the last 20 years to know for sure!
Wish I was at home for New Year 'cause I live literally 2 minutes from there and I'd nip up there for a bit.

Happy New Year!

Slainte mhath!
Parfy5 m ago

This Welshman has never heard of it either!

Blwyddyn Newydd Dda
Also in Edinburgh.
Got kid's Xmas pressies sorted for next year. Thanks OP.
XP20022 m ago

Back in the 70s in Glasgow as a young child with black hair i would be …Back in the 70s in Glasgow as a young child with black hair i would be given a lump of coal and sent to stand outside the house door about 5 mins before 00:00, then i would come in as the bells struck and be the houses firstfooter, and it was a very important thing at the time, and i have very fond memories of it because i can remember the house full of my parents, my grandparents and even my great grandparents as well, great memories of new years eve and night from that time.I am sure there are many others who did the same thing around the same time, but it kind of lost it's thing as the older generation passed on, just one of those things i guess.


I remember the exact same thing happening in Dundee in the 70s. Then my brother and I would be dragged (walking) to a few more house parties at uncles and friends houses etc. We would get back home at 4/5am ish. Mental! Can't imagine the snowflakes doing that these days haha
buzzard43 m ago

.... The custom is not unknown in the south, although maybe it's only ….... The custom is not unknown in the south, although maybe it's only those of Scottish descent.


Trust the Scots to hang on to a tradition which brings free things!
In Wales we have the Calennig Apple carried house to house with bearers singing as New Year Blessing.
Original Poster
Loving all the comments for the traditions and wondering / curious if I have bumped into / know digitalabacus in real life now having been born and bread in Dundee and still here.

I too was put out the door, although I failled miserably on the dark hair thing being a red head, but mum's reasoning was it was darker than my sisters blonde hair.

It was also a lot colder then and often snow on the ground. Bonus was I lived in Whitefield so at least the pletties helped keep the wind / snow off until you got in. Doors were rarely locked and you went round the neighbours, but only those with the lights on as you knew you were welcome.
XP20028 m ago

Back in the 70s in Glasgow as a young child with black hair i would be …Back in the 70s in Glasgow as a young child with black hair i would be given a lump of coal and sent to stand outside the house door about 5 mins before 00:00, then i would come in as the bells struck and be the houses firstfooter, and it was a very important thing at the time, and i have very fond memories of it because i can remember the house full of my parents, my grandparents and even my great grandparents as well, great memories of new years eve and night from that time.I am sure there are many others who did the same thing around the same time, but it kind of lost it's thing as the older generation passed on, just one of those things i guess.

Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years old?
.
Edited by: "cullies" 31st Dec 2017
Original Poster
cullies3 m ago

Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years …Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years old? .



It's ok, there is no mould on it, I just wouldn't eat it. Pregnant ladies may disagree with this one
midnightraven31 h, 18 m ago

A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when …A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when first footing, to ensure the person they are visiting will always have something to eat, drink and keep them warm for the coming year



I hardly think one lump of coal will keep you warm for longer than a few minutes ....... never mind a year!
Edited by: "mrbenmillion" 31st Dec 2017
cullies14 m ago

Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years …Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years old? .


You mean like a Tescos Turkey?
cheekyweegit19 m ago

Loving all the comments for the traditions and wondering / curious if I …Loving all the comments for the traditions and wondering / curious if I have bumped into / know digitalabacus in real life now having been born and bread in Dundee and still here.I too was put out the door, although I failled miserably on the dark hair thing being a red head, but mum's reasoning was it was darker than my sisters blonde hair.It was also a lot colder then and often snow on the ground. Bonus was I lived in Whitefield so at least the pletties helped keep the wind / snow off until you got in. Doors were rarely locked and you went round the neighbours, but only those with the lights on as you knew you were welcome.



You may have to explain "pletties" as well! Spent many a brilliant New Year in Whitfield housing estate, so we might well have met. Have a good one when it comes. and lang may yer lum hat, as my dad used to say.
FOOTING HELL,red 🔥HOT
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deleted849183
Half of family is scottie so i know the dance and have had to walk out the back and around to the front again for many years to be first through the door with coal lump in hand.

Maybe technically cheating but it always gets done.

EDIT: thinking on i've had crap luck for about the past 8 years or so. Might need to accost someone to do it this year.
Edited by: "deleted849183" 31st Dec 2017
it's not just a Scots tradition, we grew up doing this near Wigan
cullies1 h, 0 m ago

Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years …Beware of this coal its not fresh..............maybe up to a million years old? .



not quite .. try 300-350 million years old
cheekyweegit2 h, 30 m ago

It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house …It a very old Scottish tradition to take a lump of coal to a persons house you are visiting for the first time after the new year, usually just after midnight to bring luck. Never even thought about it just being Scottish so thanks for bringing that to my and others attention.


I'm from oldham northern England and my dad does the same. He leaves the coal in the kitchen drawer all year. At midnight he goes into the garden with the coal and brings in the year and goes around kissing everyone. Once he's done it everyone else does it. But that might be because my mum is from skye
Edited by: "brendanhickey" 31st Dec 2017
what a fantastic tradition, first i heard of it
We do this, my Dad's side are all Scots and we take coal, whisjy (gin this year) money and bread - take the old year oot the back door and bring the new year in. The tallest, darkest haired person has to do this, my Aunt used to wait for my dad to go round and do so because my uncle was a redhead!
midnightraven32 h, 23 m ago

A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when …A Scottish person will always take fruit bun, whisky & a lump of coal when first footing, to ensure the person they are visiting will always have something to eat, drink and keep them warm for the coming year


That's so nice and thoughtfull...
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