free new boiler if you receive certain benefits such as child tax credits/working tax credit
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free new boiler if you receive certain benefits such as child tax credits/working tax credit

42
Found 4th Aug 2014
if you receive certain benefits such as child tax credits/working tax credit (t&c applies on your total household income), you may be eligible for a new boiler. boiler must be over 7 years old.

this is a new government scheme, many companies out there are providing this service but I have highlighted the link of one the companies which outlines the t&c which makes it easy to check if you qualify.

Unfortunately I don't but hopw it helps others

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42 Comments

Again another scheme for people that don't work

Should be in Freebies.

its called the Green Deal

They provide a free 2 year warranty boiler

So a private landlord, that is already creaming it with high rents, that some will be claiming housing benefits for...... will get a new boiler for their property.
Nice little perk for a rich landlord there.

People that work get it to. We applied as my wee boy is disabled. After months we got a inspector out and they told us as we had neighbours and the heat from there houses made are house fine. She then told us to get a gas man out and ask him to have your boiler condemned then u might get help. It's not easy to get this. My mum had it started and they failed her on her electric. She fought for months for them to finish it as well as having to fix her electric. She did get it but it was a nightmare.

Working tax credits is for those who work- I may look into this as ours is on its last legs.

Jeez, it's bad enough you get the tossers on the phone every five minutes trying to talk you into this.

Just looked and although we do receive working tax credits, our income is more than their required amount

It doesn't help when the "sales" people don't know what they're doing either. My wife started the process with one company, until I asked about the total household income - the "sales" muppet hadn't even asked.

Will have a chat with me mum about this - cheers!

If the government forced landlords to bring up their properties to a certain standard, then we wouldn't need a hare brained scheme like this. Not to mention tax payers having no choice but to pay for it.

tax payers pay for worse things than this!

Original Poster

people are moaning because they dont qualify, I dont qualify either but I'm sure its a benefit to those who are eligible! like I said before if u look closely at the t&c it gives you the list of people who claim certain benefits can apply for this grant. could be your dad on pension credit or ur relative on income support, end of the day its free for someone who needs it. yes I know it angers people that pay their taxes towards these schemes but if you were at the other end im sure you'd benefit

uddinp

people are moaning because they dont qualify, I dont qualify either but … people are moaning because they dont qualify, I dont qualify either but I'm sure its a benefit to those who are eligible! like I said before if u look closely at the t&c it gives you the list of people who claim certain benefits can apply for this grant. could be your dad on pension credit or ur relative on income support, end of the day its free for someone who needs it. yes I know it angers people that pay their taxes towards these schemes but if you were at the other end im sure you'd benefit



I'm all for schemes that help people on low imcomes, I'm even happy to pay taxes towards it.....
But it incenses me that private landlords are effectively saving thousands on a new boiler. They should pay for improvements to their property, not tax payers.

Banned

Those that complain about (having to pay for others) working tax credit are simply a little ignorant. I will help them.

The idea is that those on a lower income are given working tax credits to make up for the shortfall that they are not being paid by the employer to give them more of a living wage.

a) This helps the business to create more work that may not otherwise exist.
b) It helps a person that may have little or few qualifications gain experience and/or qualifications.
c) When they become more experienced / qualified they then rise above the threshold and pay tax which pays for others to have the chance to do the same thing.
d) The money they earn goes back into the economy through them spending.

Working tax credit is a good thing.

Edited by: "Musician" 4th Aug 2014

shame i can only vote cold once for these freeloaders

Yet again I wonder why I bother, i work hard to get good cv and well paying job, don't see enough of my kids because I'm always working overtime to pay for my own boilers and expensive childcare, mortgage, bills etc don't get any help at all from the powers that be and yet again more stuff is being handed out to the lazy, it really makes you wonder why you bother. My new boiler cost me £1500 which I worked hard for and sacrificed time with my kids for. Its just all wrong, bring on the bedroom tax oh and if you can't afford to pay for your own kids then don't breed.

If the government is naive enough to offer these incentives ( for people to stay at the lower end of pay scale) then I am not sure how much I have against it? What about those two massive aircraft carries we are building?

Shame on all of you for your comments and tarring everyone with the unemployed label.
My Mother is deaf, blind and had a stroke, became a widow at 36, brought up 4 children by working 3 jobs that paid no pension - therefore she qualifies for a new boiler.
So you would deny her a free boiler?

It's just not the unemployed that benefit for these schemes!
Edited by: "Sambat" 4th Aug 2014

Original Poster

There are people with legitimate reasons to receive such incentives but as with anything there are ones who do abuse the system. rather than expressing your concerns here (which isn't going to get u anywhere) why dont u take it up with the people who make the rules in the first place? lets just face the fact that we have a rubbish government that gets the working class people to work harder but at least we can say we have earned an honest living and have really helped someone who needed our help most via tax!

Musician

Those that complain about (having to pay for others) working tax credit … Those that complain about (having to pay for others) working tax credit are simply a little ignorant. I will help them. The idea is that those on a lower income are given working tax credits to make up for the shortfall that they are not being paid by the employer to give them more of a living wage. a) This helps the business to create more work that may not otherwise exist.b) It helps a person that may have little or few qualifications gain experience and/or qualifications.c) When they become more experienced / qualified they then rise above the threshold and pay tax which pays for others to have the chance to do the same thing.d) The money they earn goes back into the economy through them spending.Working tax credit is a good thing.


No, they encourage employers to create meaningless part time work rather than full time careers. The super markets being especially guilty as they know that they can employ endless people on cruddy 18 hour contracts and the government (taxpayer) will supplement their wage. Whereas previously it could have been considered a full-time career job in retail, nowadays it's a pretty vacuous profession.

I should add that this is not a comment against the unemployed or low income workers, as I have every sympathy for people in a pretty crappy job market. However, I do believe that working tax credits have ruined the career market for unskilled/low-skilled labour.

Edited by: "N1Andy" 4th Aug 2014

I think we can all agree there is certain people who will genuinely benefit from this deal but in comparison to those who work and can't afford a new boiler yet don't qualify for this deal the numbers will be as high as those claiming on this deal who really don't deserve it.

I work, my fiancee works both on a pretty low wage. Together we earn too much to qualify for any deal and have consciously not had any kids as we can't afford them. We don't drink, smoke or gamble and have not had a holiday in the UK or abroad in 7 years yet we get no working tax credits and because we own our home we can't afford to replace our clapped out back boiler.

On the same street a rented benefit recieving family who are not in receipt of benifits for any of the right reasons. This money and help should go to those deserving like the few cases already mentioned but unfortunately it also goes to this family who sprout kids to keep them in their house and choose not to work yet have more possessions and handouts than they should.

This is the low life's this typically end up funding an not enough deserving souls who actually need benefits for good reason
Edited by: "Kenneth131" 4th Aug 2014

greendan

Again another scheme for people that don't work



Kind of.

Don't be fooled by these companies that are giving away free boilers. They're not free, they're subsidised by the leading energy supplier in your area, e-on, british gas, npower etc. They're not subsidised by the government, and it doesn't come out of the tax payers pocket.

The government introduced the Energy Companies Obligation (ECO) in 2012 to makes sure that 15% of each supplier’s obligation is used improve the energy efficiency of the homes. Mainly for the government's own commitment to keep on track of the EU mandates they've agreed to for our carbon footprint in the UK.


There are some requirements before you'd be considered for this scheme.

Firstly, if you're getting Job Seekers Allowance, or as it's now known, Employment and Support Allowance you don't qualify for a free boiler automatically because ESA is now in two parts. If you're in the ESA's Work-Related Activity Group (formally JSA) you won't qualify at all for a free boiler. The second ESA group, the Support Group (formally Incapacity/disabled) can qualify, but only if they meet other requirements first, as well as having an additional disability premium (wheelchair etc).

So the reality is, the people who're looking for work but haven't found it yet can't get a free boiler. People who're unable to work due to a disability maybe able to get a free boiler if other requirements are met.

In fact, the people that are most able to get a free boiler are people who own their own property and are working limited hours and have kids as they tend to qualify pretty much straight away for the boiler.

Lastly, when it does come to getting the free boiler installed, it's only the actual direct replacement of the boiler that's free. Additional pipes, any electrical work (apart from room thermostat), replacement pumps, motorised Y valves (this is most without a condencing boiler already) etc are additional costs. More so, if your boiler doesn't fit as a redirect replacement, for example, you have a free standing boiler, you simply won't quality in most areas due to the additional costs. Remember this scheme is more about carbon foot print then getting people warm. If they can reduce two homes energy consumption they'll do that before replacing one freestanding boiler or awkward wall mounted one.

So yeah, it's really unlikely that unemployed people are going to qualify for the boiler in the first place and more so unlikely that they'll be able to afford to pay the additional costs that come with it (usually around at least £250 for a Y valve installed).

Si__

Kind of.Don't be fooled by these companies that are giving away free … Kind of.Don't be fooled by these companies that are giving away free boilers. They're not free, they're subsidised by the leading energy supplier in your area, e-on, british gas, npower etc. They're not subsidised by the government, and it doesn't come out of the tax payers pocket. The government introduced the Energy Companies Obligation (ECO) in 2012 to makes sure that 15% of each supplier’s obligation is used improve the energy efficiency of the homes. Mainly for the government's own commitment to keep on track of the EU mandates they've agreed to for our carbon footprint in the UK.There are some requirements before you'd be considered for this scheme. Firstly, if you're getting Job Seekers Allowance, or as it's now known, Employment and Support Allowance you don't qualify for a free boiler automatically because ESA is now in two parts. If you're in the ESA's Work-Related Activity Group (formally JSA) you won't qualify at all for a free boiler. The second ESA group, the Support Group (formally Incapacity/disabled) can qualify, but only if they meet other requirements first, as well as having an additional disability premium (wheelchair etc).So the reality is, the people who're looking for work but haven't found it yet can't get a free boiler. People who're unable to work due to a disability maybe able to get a free boiler if other requirements are met.In fact, the people that are most able to get a free boiler are people who own their own property and are working limited hours and have kids as they tend to qualify pretty much straight away for the boiler.Lastly, when it does come to getting the free boiler installed, it's only the actual direct replacement of the boiler that's free. Additional pipes, any electrical work (apart from room thermostat), replacement pumps, motorised Y valves (this is most without a condencing boiler already) etc are additional costs. More so, if your boiler doesn't fit as a redirect replacement, for example, you have a free standing boiler, you simply won't quality in most areas due to the additional costs. Remember this scheme is more about carbon foot print then getting people warm. If they can reduce two homes energy consumption they'll do that before replacing one freestanding boiler or awkward wall mounted one.So yeah, it's really unlikely that unemployed people are going to qualify for the boiler in the first place and more so unlikely that they'll be able to afford to pay the additional costs that come with it (usually around at least £250 for a Y valve installed).



Since when did JSA change to ESA ?
ESA was always for people who are sick or disabled. With ESA Support for those that cannot do any work and ESA Work Related Activity Group for those that the benefit agency agree they have limited capabilities for work but can do some sort of work.
I'm not aware that this has changed.

Musician

Those that complain about (having to pay for others) working tax credit … Those that complain about (having to pay for others) working tax credit are simply a little ignorant. I will help them. The idea is that those on a lower income are given working tax credits to make up for the shortfall that they are not being paid by the employer to give them more of a living wage. a) This helps the business to create more work that may not otherwise exist.b) It helps a person that may have little or few qualifications gain experience and/or qualifications.c) When they become more experienced / qualified they then rise above the threshold and pay tax which pays for others to have the chance to do the same thing.d) The money they earn goes back into the economy through them spending.Working tax credit is a good thing.



Probably not the place for this but Tax Credits of any kind are NOT a good idea. It was a political con to put a large chunk of the aspiring middle class onto "benefits", so therefore any mention of reform to the "benefits" system would garner mass criticism and, guess what, that's what happened.

Unfortunately, this then meant that the system was accessible to anyone in the country. It would be much more beneficial to all concerned to simply raise the lower threshold for income tax, or extend the bandings across larger brackets lower down.

This is also something which people MISS when they discuss Europe. It is completely impossible for a young family on minimum wage/average income to be net contributors to the UK economy, because they will be in receipt of both working and child tax credits, which will pay them more than is taken in tax; not including the costs associated in schooling their children, providing medical care, etc.

The NHS and benefits system are in fact based on the principle of a legacy system with each generation taking LESS than that before, so there is surplus to cover the ever increasing population (at both ends of the age range); tax credits completely destroy this principle, because it redistributes the contributions by several people, directly back to one person (it does this at great expense too).

This scheme on the other hand was a great idea when LABOUR (because it was them) introduced it at a time of apparent surplus in the national finances, with the intention of also lowering CO2 and reducing use of fossil fuels; it does however seem a bit decadent now to extend it to tenants and housing associations.

And finally, there is no such thing as a BEDROOM TAX (for anyone that uses that expression), social housing has been built with public money, many housing associations were given grants from the Housing Corporation, some European money too, that was until 2010; though the current government are soon to launch an equivalent scheme. Many councils also moved their housing stocks into ALMOs (Arms Length Management Organisations) to prevent right to buy moves from tenants. This is how you arrive at subsidised rents, because they were built with tax payers money, so to apply a rule regarding benefits payments to social housing, as is the case in the private sector is NOT and can NEVER be a tax. What people need to do is demand that their housing association reduce the rent accordingly if they are unable to provide them alternative accommodation; but this is not being challenged by any tenants, or politicians!

Boy, that was good to vent!

Banned

DiggyDown

Probably not the place for this but Tax Credits of any kind are NOT a … Probably not the place for this but Tax Credits of any kind are NOT a good idea. It was a political con to put a large chunk of the aspiring middle class onto "benefits", so therefore any mention of reform to the "benefits" system would garner mass criticism and, guess what, that's what happened.Unfortunately, this then meant that the system was accessible to anyone in the country. It would be much more beneficial to all concerned to simply raise the lower threshold for income tax, or extend the bandings across larger brackets lower down.This is also something which people MISS when they discuss Europe. It is completely impossible for a young family on minimum wage/average income to be net contributors to the UK economy, because they will be in receipt of both working and child tax credits, which will pay them more than is taken in tax; not including the costs associated in schooling their children, providing medical care, etc. The NHS and benefits system are in fact based on the principle of a legacy system with each generation taking LESS than that before, so there is surplus to cover the ever increasing population (at both ends of the age range); tax credits completely destroy this principle, because it redistributes the contributions by several people, directly back to one person (it does this at great expense too).This scheme on the other hand was a great idea when LABOUR (because it was them) introduced it at a time of apparent surplus in the national finances, with the intention of also lowering CO2 and reducing use of fossil fuels; it does however seem a bit decadent now to extend it to tenants and housing associations.And finally, there is no such thing as a BEDROOM TAX (for anyone that uses that expression), social housing has been built with public money, many housing associations were given grants from the Housing Corporation, some European money too, that was until 2010; though the current government are soon to launch an equivalent scheme. Many councils also moved their housing stocks into ALMOs (Arms Length Management Organisations) to prevent right to buy moves from tenants. This is how you arrive at subsidised rents, because they were built with tax payers money, so to apply a rule regarding benefits payments to social housing, as is the case in the private sector is NOT and can NEVER be a tax. What people need to do is demand that their housing association reduce the rent accordingly if they are unable to provide them alternative accommodation; but this is not being challenged by any tenants, or politicians!Boy, that was good to vent!



Nice story, although somewhat missing the point.
Edited by: "Musician" 5th Aug 2014

The main beneficiary of the scheme will actually be the bill-payer, who will pay less for their gas (reduced consumption).
It aims to positively impact on fuel poverty whilst reducing CO2 emissions.
We changed our boiler (with a grant subsidy) about 3 years ago and the gas bill reduced by around 25%.

sad to say, but its a crime to be a OAP or receive any sort of benefit now days. if you work and get a low wage your a scrounging rat and if your old you should be dead according to half these comments made on here. all I'll say is I can't wait till your old or fall on hard times !!!!!!!!!!

To those that are suffering from the green eyed monster, would you like a nice safe home or for your neighbours to be using a deathtrap? Gas leaks and explosions affect others too.

Until landlords are held to account its still a better use of cash then ministers expenses.

caz01

sad to say, but its a crime to be a OAP or receive any sort of benefit … sad to say, but its a crime to be a OAP or receive any sort of benefit now days. if you work and get a low wage your a scrounging rat and if your old you should be dead according to half these comments made on here. all I'll say is I can't wait till your old or fall on hard times !!!!!!!!!!



Jealousy, hatred, bitterness...... everyone points the finger at other sectors of society nowadays.
Divide and rule, a tactic that governments are quite good at.

all while MP's chomp from their trough laughing @ us muppets

The trouble is with these schemes are the people who complain about their taxes paying for it are the ones who employ others on minimum wage and keep it that way regardless of training and personal development. A pay rise is only when this god forsaken government decides to increase the national minimum wage. So really it comes down to stop winging and appreciate the people who do the actual work in this country and maybe reward them for their efforts so that your taxes don't have to pay their working tax credits etc or the little things done to make the environment greener and in return give a better standard of living.

Musician

Nice story, although somewhat missing the point.



Hmmmm?

I didn't really respond to your nonsense about tax credits helping increase an individual's employability, which is certainly does not and was not intended to either. Is that what you meant? It does not create more employment, it simply keeps those on lower wages in that position. And of course, finally, it doesn't help the economy to give someone back (as is more often than not the case) more in tax credits than they are contributing. Is that a more direct answer to your points?

Hello thought this was the place to meet tory daily mail readers otherwise known as tax eh avoiders.
Try looking after someone ill for years on the money I get and bump your gums. clueless.
By the way job seekers is £75 and if someones getting £1,000s its not in their pocket its the landlords.

antonywhite37

shame i can only vote cold once for these freeloaders



says someone looking for freebies

Kenneth131

I think we can all agree there is certain people who will genuinely … I think we can all agree there is certain people who will genuinely benefit from this deal but in comparison to those who work and can't afford a new boiler yet don't qualify for this deal the numbers will be as high as those claiming on this deal who really don't deserve it.I work, my fiancee works both on a pretty low wage. Together we earn too much to qualify for any deal and have consciously not had any kids as we can't afford them. We don't drink, smoke or gamble and have not had a holiday in the UK or abroad in 7 years yet we get no working tax credits and because we own our home we can't afford to replace our clapped out back boiler. On the same street a rented benefit recieving family who are not in receipt of benifits for any of the right reasons. This money and help should go to those deserving like the few cases already mentioned but unfortunately it also goes to this family who sprout kids to keep them in their house and choose not to work yet have more possessions and handouts than they should. This is the low life's this typically end up funding an not enough deserving souls who actually need benefits for good reason



You don't have kids so you don't qualify for a lot of these benefits,my understanding of this deal is,even if people get working tax credits they need to have a child/children to qualify.

Banned

DiggyDown

Hmmmm?I didn't really respond to your nonsense about tax credits helping … Hmmmm?I didn't really respond to your nonsense about tax credits helping increase an individual's employability, which is certainly does not and was not intended to either. Is that what you meant? It does not create more employment, it simply keeps those on lower wages in that position. And of course, finally, it doesn't help the economy to give someone back (as is more often than not the case) more in tax credits than they are contributing. Is that a more direct answer to your points?



More direct yes, correct no, and also rather cynical. I know plenty of people, myself included, that without working tax credit would have struggled. They then have, myself included again, managed to gain a whole set of qualifications and then gone way above the threshold. I now run the international logistics and transport for a respected company within my field. Without working tax credit to make it worth while I would never have gained my basic qualifications; fork lift driving, ERP systems, goods in etc to allow me to move forward into where I am now. I now pay way more in tax than what I took so everyone is a winner.

I fail to see how that doesn't help the economy. I fail to see why that wouldn't create the initial work because a company only has to pay someone say 12k when the rest is subsidised by the government up to 16k, so in effect that job may not exist if the company had to pay so much itself for it. It's not really difficult to understand why it is win win.

As for the "bedroom tax" it's another good idea in theory, just currently badly implemented as replacement properties with fewer rooms are in short supply and on occasion it can have an adverse effect on people such as the disabled when the whole individual situation is not correctly examined. Why a family of 4 for example should be able to keep their house once the children have flown the nest simply makes no sense when there are upcoming families in a need of a property of that size.

The right to buy scheme is another good idea badly implemented. It allows those on social housing the chance to own their property at a discount. It also slowly clears "ghetto" areas where everyone is on social housing, many (not all) not caring about their property; as soon as people own their property they start to care for it, and their neighbourhood better. What is wrong is that there are not enough new houses being built to replace the ones that have been sold off.

The point you were missing is that many do not stay "not being net contributors" they move on, because of these schemes.

Si__

Kind of.Don't be fooled by these companies that are giving away free … Kind of.Don't be fooled by these companies that are giving away free boilers. They're not free, they're subsidised by the leading energy supplier in your area, e-on, british gas, npower etc. They're not subsidised by the government, and it doesn't come out of the tax payers pocket. The government introduced the Energy Companies Obligation (ECO) in 2012 to makes sure that 15% of each supplier’s obligation is used improve the energy efficiency of the homes. Mainly for the government's own commitment to keep on track of the EU mandates they've agreed to for our carbon footprint in the UK.There are some requirements before you'd be considered for this scheme. Firstly, if you're getting Job Seekers Allowance, or as it's now known, Employment and Support Allowance you don't qualify for a free boiler automatically because ESA is now in two parts. If you're in the ESA's Work-Related Activity Group (formally JSA) you won't qualify at all for a free boiler. The second ESA group, the Support Group (formally Incapacity/disabled) can qualify, but only if they meet other requirements first, as well as having an additional disability premium (wheelchair etc).So the reality is, the people who're looking for work but haven't found it yet can't get a free boiler. People who're unable to work due to a disability maybe able to get a free boiler if other requirements are met.In fact, the people that are most able to get a free boiler are people who own their own property and are working limited hours and have kids as they tend to qualify pretty much straight away for the boiler.Lastly, when it does come to getting the free boiler installed, it's only the actual direct replacement of the boiler that's free. Additional pipes, any electrical work (apart from room thermostat), replacement pumps, motorised Y valves (this is most without a condencing boiler already) etc are additional costs. More so, if your boiler doesn't fit as a redirect replacement, for example, you have a free standing boiler, you simply won't quality in most areas due to the additional costs. Remember this scheme is more about carbon foot print then getting people warm. If they can reduce two homes energy consumption they'll do that before replacing one freestanding boiler or awkward wall mounted one.So yeah, it's really unlikely that unemployed people are going to qualify for the boiler in the first place and more so unlikely that they'll be able to afford to pay the additional costs that come with it (usually around at least £250 for a Y valve installed).



Just wondered why a floor-standing boiler should be a problem? We were able to select one (condensing, from the approved list) which replaced the 12 year-old floor-mounted boiler quite nicely with minimal adaptation.

Although I'm a pensioner, my boiler is over 20 years old and I can't afford to replace it, I don't benefit because I'm not eligible to claim any benefits. Nevertheless, I certainly don't begrudge those who can benefit. What does infuriate me is the number of phone calls I get, regarding both this and solar panels, from companies who know nothing about me yet assure me that I can benefit from the government's generosity. I hope they appreciate the advice I give them before I put the phone down.
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