Free off peak energy for Economy 7 customers, for 12 months, with Ebico Night Owl
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Free off peak energy for Economy 7 customers, for 12 months, with Ebico Night Owl

37
Found 19th Nov
Ebico recently launched this 12 month deal, that gives 'free' off peak energy for Economy 7 customers.

There is a reasonable use term in the contract that means you must not use more than 60% of your annual energy during the free off peak period. (Apologies for missing the word, 'not')

Ebico is an ethical company and aims to help those in fuel poverty

Top comments

and here is the deatail, as I suspected it is a numbers game, and you get ripped off during the day, inc a ridiculous standing charge

18.1705p per kWh
Night unit rate 0.0000p per kWh
Standing charge 41.59p per day

89quidyoucantgowrong6 m ago

Based on average UK household electricity consumption being 4,600kWh, if …Based on average UK household electricity consumption being 4,600kWh, if 60% was at 0p and 40% at 18.175p, you pay £334 vs £552 at 12p per kWh, plus perhaps another 15p per day = £54 for the high standing charge.


There's no need to guess - MSE have already ran the numbers and it only becomes economical if you're maxing out the 60% limit (and even then you're only saving 15 quid a year) moneysavingexpert.com/new…eap

you should not consume more than 60% of your energy during the free period

your description says the opposite
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 19th Nov

Very expensive energy during the day though. The issue is you can only use upto 60%, and it only becomes economical around 57%-58% according to MSE: moneysavingexpert.com/new…eap
Edited by: "Uns" 19th Nov
37 Comments

you should not consume more than 60% of your energy during the free period

your description says the opposite
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 19th Nov

You need to edit deal so it states you must not use more than 60%....

No, the terms state that your night time use must not exceed 60% of overall consumption. The opposite of what you posted. This tariff is also open to smart meter customers without Economy 7. Bear in mind the day rate might be higher. Could work out pretty good for EV car owners.

I declare adamspencer95 the winner!

I own an electric car, the problem comes if I charge every night I can see that being more than 60%, the devil is in the detail so will take a look, thx OP

Aeschylus2 m ago

I own an electric car, the problem comes if I charge every night I can see …I own an electric car, the problem comes if I charge every night I can see that being more than 60%, the devil is in the detail so will take a look, thx OP


If it looked like being a problem, you could start charging earlier in the evening to make sure you don't go over the 60%.

Very expensive energy during the day though. The issue is you can only use upto 60%, and it only becomes economical around 57%-58% according to MSE: moneysavingexpert.com/new…eap
Edited by: "Uns" 19th Nov

and here is the deatail, as I suspected it is a numbers game, and you get ripped off during the day, inc a ridiculous standing charge

18.1705p per kWh
Night unit rate 0.0000p per kWh
Standing charge 41.59p per day

89quidyoucantgowrong1 m ago

If it looked like being a problem, you could start charging earlier in the …If it looked like being a problem, you could start charging earlier in the evening to make sure you don't go over the 60%.


Yes, but then you're paying way over the odds to charge it. The day rates are much more expensive than your average tariff.

I would just run everything on off peak until spring then leave them paying the early penalty levy.

Great deal if you need to heat a greenhouse too
Edited by: "hooray.henry" 19th Nov

Yeah, that standing charge is criminal. Ironic that Ebico are one of the very few suppliers who still do a no standing charge tariff for very low users.

Based on average UK household electricity consumption being 4,600kWh, if 60% was at 0p and 40% at 18.175p, you pay £334 vs £552 at 12p per kWh, plus perhaps another 15p per day = £54 for the high standing charge.
Edited by: "89quidyoucantgowrong" 19th Nov

89quidyoucantgowrong6 m ago

Based on average UK household electricity consumption being 4,600kWh, if …Based on average UK household electricity consumption being 4,600kWh, if 60% was at 0p and 40% at 18.175p, you pay £334 vs £552 at 12p per kWh, plus perhaps another 15p per day = £54 for the high standing charge.


There's no need to guess - MSE have already ran the numbers and it only becomes economical if you're maxing out the 60% limit (and even then you're only saving 15 quid a year) moneysavingexpert.com/new…eap

what a rip off... 150 pounds of standing charge!!

If you had an EV, your annual kWh is highly likely to be at least double the UK average and the split between day/night could be tweaked to keep on that 60% sweet spot with a little record keeping and planning. MSE's figures are just for an average user, not an EV car owner.

89quidyoucantgowrong6 m ago

If you had an EV, your annual kWh is highly likely to be at least double …If you had an EV, your annual kWh is highly likely to be at least double the UK average and the split between day/night could be tweaked to keep on that 60% sweet spot with a little record keeping and planning. MSE's figures are just for an average user, not an EV car owner.



don't think you can charge EV on e7 meters... these are for storage heaters.

This tariff (and EBICO in general) is designed to help people who struggle to pay their bills. I.E power their storage radiators, if they are unfortunate enough to have them as a primary source of heating. I doubt that Ebico had any thought of subsidising EV users and their inefficient vehicles.

airbus3301 h, 2 m ago

This tariff (and EBICO in general) is designed to help people who struggle …This tariff (and EBICO in general) is designed to help people who struggle to pay their bills. I.E power their storage radiators, if they are unfortunate enough to have them as a primary source of heating. I doubt that Ebico had any thought of subsidising EV users and their inefficient vehicles.



My own experience from checking comparison websites and as mentioned above, Ebico are very expensive and you'd be better off elsewhere

airbus3301 h, 47 m ago

inefficient vehicles.


Costs me 96p to fully charge my EV from empty. I can drive 100 miles on that. More efficient than any ICE car I’ve ever owned.

for cryptomining - this is a godsend

arma_gera7 h, 35 m ago

don't think you can charge EV on e7 meters... these are for storage …don't think you can charge EV on e7 meters... these are for storage heaters.


Yes you can. I do. It's a tariff not a type.

Rastafari5 h, 1 m ago

Costs me 96p to fully charge my EV from empty. I can drive 100 miles on …Costs me 96p to fully charge my EV from empty. I can drive 100 miles on that. More efficient than any ICE car I’ve ever owned.


How does it cost 96p? I have a night rate of 7.9p and charging our 30kwh leaf costs £2.37 which will do around 125miles.....

What car at what rate?

Original Poster

Apologies for missing the word 'not' in the original post .

You have to look at your own figures to see if it suits you. This is around £160 a year cheaper than the tariff I'm currently on but I'd fall foul by using around 74% of my energy at night, so won't switch. However, if you can use around 60% then it's a good deal.

89quidyoucantgowrong9 h, 35 m ago

If you had an EV, your annual kWh is highly likely to be at least double …If you had an EV, your annual kWh is highly likely to be at least double the UK average and the split between day/night could be tweaked to keep on that 60% sweet spot with a little record keeping and planning. MSE's figures are just for an average user, not an EV car owner.


The average UK household uses 4600kWh per year. The average driver does 7900 miles per year. 3.5 miles per kWh works for a low-end average measure of efficiency. Add a buffer of about 20% to allow for losses during charging. The average EV will use about 2800kWh per year, probably less as my estimates are on the generous side.

In practice, my electricity usage has only gone up by about 1200kWh per year for 7000 miles. So the losses during charging are some way below 20%. Plus, I do some public charging. My electricity usage has increased about 50%, or £20/month.

airbus3308 h, 39 m ago

This tariff (and EBICO in general) is designed to help people who struggle …This tariff (and EBICO in general) is designed to help people who struggle to pay their bills. I.E power their storage radiators, if they are unfortunate enough to have them as a primary source of heating. I doubt that Ebico had any thought of subsidising EV users and their inefficient vehicles.


A gallon of Diesel contains 158.73MJ of energy. That's 0.38 miles per megajoule, based on consumption of 60 miles per gallon.

One kilowatt hour of electricity contains 3.6MJ of energy. Being generous to the diesel by using a low efficiency figure for the EV (3.5 miles per kilowatt hour) gives 0.97 miles per megajoule. Using an efficient EV like the Ioniq, that could be up as high as 1.53 miles per megajoule.

There's fair criticisms to level at EVs. And then there's nonsense like them being "inefficient".
Edited by: "satchef1" 20th Nov

satchef128 m ago

The average UK household uses 4600kWh per year. The average driver does …The average UK household uses 4600kWh per year. The average driver does 7900 miles per year. 3.5 miles per kWh works for a low-end average measure of efficiency. Add a buffer of about 20% to allow for losses during charging. The average EV will use about 2800kWh per year, probably less as my estimates are on the generous side.In practice, my electricity usage has only gone up by about 1200kWh per year for 7000 miles. So the losses during charging are some way below 20%. Plus, I do some public charging. My electricity usage has increased about 50%, or £20/month.A gallon of Diesel contains 158.73MJ of energy. That's 0.38 miles per megajoule, based on consumption of 60 miles per gallon.One kilowatt hour of electricity contains 3.6MJ of energy. Being generous to the diesel by using a low efficiency figure for the EV (3.5 miles per kilowatt hour) gives 0.97 miles per megajoule. Using an efficient EV like the Ioniq, that could be up as high as 1.53 miles per megajoule.There's fair criticisms to level at EVs. And then there's nonsense like them being "inefficient".


Your fuel like-for-like comparison is correct, but as your last sentence alludes to, rather glosses over the hidden 'costs' of running an EV. By that I mean the costs to the environment from manufacture and disposal of the EV plus the hitherto unknown future costs of producing all the extra electricity to run them. But I would guess that you know this already. It just depends on where you are viewing the word 'inefficient' from.

As the OP stated, Ebico is trying to help those dealing with fuel poverty, not subsidise EV owners.
Edited by: "airbus330" 20th Nov

CheapoChaser2 h, 5 m ago

How does it cost 96p? I have a night rate of 7.9p and charging our 30kwh …How does it cost 96p? I have a night rate of 7.9p and charging our 30kwh leaf costs £2.37 which will do around 125miles.....What car at what rate?


22kW Renault Zoe. Consumers 24kW to charge 0-100%. E7 rate is 4p/kWh. 24*0.04=£0.96.

Rastafari21 m ago

22kW Renault Zoe. Consumers 24kW to charge 0-100%. E7 rate is 4p/kWh. …22kW Renault Zoe. Consumers 24kW to charge 0-100%. E7 rate is 4p/kWh. 24*0.04=£0.96.


Our Zoe didn't manage 100 miles on a charge best I got was 70.
Who is the energy supplier and what's the day rate?
Oh and do they allow FIT? I'm on the old solar scheme that pays me ~£400/annum not every supplier supports this.
Edited by: "CheapoChaser" 20th Nov

That daily standing charge is more than double the charge when I was an Ebico customer 24 months ago, so they arent losing out much.

This is a publicity stunt to regain customers after we all left - who wouldnt, when they upped their prices so much, the main stream suppliers were cheaper.

Original Poster

I was a previous customer of Ebico, when I had low usage, (whilst working away) due to the zero standing charge. On my return, Scottish Power was best for me. Scottish Power are nowhere near the cheapest available to me now, so have just left them, to go to Utilita. Since switching, this tariff came out, which if it wasn't for the 60% rule, I'd jump at.

I'm an electric only customer, (no gas here), so my heating and hot water is all electric, so it's important for me to find the best deal I can. I use 1,900 KWh in the day and 5,400 KWh at night. Even with the high standing charge, the price to me would be £41.99 a month with Ebico, (if I could meet the criteria).

it's important to look at the whole picture, not just the standing charge

CheapoChaser1 h, 18 m ago

Our Zoe didn't manage 100 miles on a charge best I got was 70.Who is the …Our Zoe didn't manage 100 miles on a charge best I got was 70.Who is the energy supplier and what's the day rate?Oh and do they allow FIT? I'm on the old solar scheme that pays me ~£400/annum not every supplier supports this.


My record is 112 miles on a single charge. Have attained over 100 miles many times. If you’re only getting 70 there’s something wrong. Tariff is Sainsbury’s Fixed Price May 2017, extended til May 2018.

Gas standing charge: £0.2477 ex vat (£0.26 inc VAT).
Gas unit charge: £0.0226 ex vat (£0.02373 inc VAT).

Elec standing charge: £0.2477 ex vat (£0.26 inc VAT).
Elec day charge: £0.0896 ex vat (£0.09408 inc VAT).
Elec night charge: £0.0381 ex vat (£0.040005 inc VAT).

for those of us who own EV's don't forget OVO's tariff where you get free public charging for 2 years

Original Poster

Rastafari3 h, 5 m ago

My record is 112 miles on a single charge. Have attained over 100 miles …My record is 112 miles on a single charge. Have attained over 100 miles many times. If you’re only getting 70 there’s something wrong. Tariff is Sainsbury’s Fixed Price May 2017, extended til May 2018. Gas standing charge: £0.2477 ex vat (£0.26 inc VAT).Gas unit charge: £0.0226 ex vat (£0.02373 inc VAT). Elec standing charge: £0.2477 ex vat (£0.26 inc VAT). Elec day charge: £0.0896 ex vat (£0.09408 inc VAT). Elec night charge: £0.0381 ex vat (£0.040005 inc VAT).


That is a very good tariff you're on there, sadly not available anymore. Standby for a big increase in May 18

Microwave18 m ago

That is a very good tariff you're on there, sadly not available anymore. …That is a very good tariff you're on there, sadly not available anymore. Standby for a big increase in May 18



Indeed.

Nissan leaf and electric car owners take note!

Is there a maximum daily/weekly/monthly usage?

Original Poster

robodan91821st Nov

Is there a maximum daily/weekly/monthly usage?


The only stipulation I see is that no more than 60% of your electric usage is during the off peak period.

Microwave1 h, 20 m ago

The only stipulation I see is that no more than 60% of your electric usage …The only stipulation I see is that no more than 60% of your electric usage is during the off peak period.


Excellent
This could save me a bundle!
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