Free Test at Lloyds Chemist for Type 2 Diabetes
860°Expired

Free Test at Lloyds Chemist for Type 2 Diabetes

63
Found 7th Jul
Have I got diabetes?

If you think you may have developed Type 2 Diabetes, we’re here to help. The free test is for people aged 16 and over who may be at risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, a condition characterised by what is known as insulin resistance.

This is where the body does not effectively respond to the insulin produced, as a result blood sugar levels become too high. It can be managed by taking tablets such as Metformin and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app X2 to see if your sugar levels ok. Go for the free test to see if your sugar level is a problem in the first place. NHS might survive longer if ppl stopped wasting gp apps unless really needing them. P.s. well done posting this OP. Nice.
snappyfish6 h, 7 m ago

Serious question, isn't it free at docters?


Yes. A doctor can refer you on to a nurse to take samples and test properly for free, but it takes up quite a few appointments in the process.

It's better to see the pharmacist for this free screening, and then go for official diagnosis and treatment through the doctor if this was positive.

Stops you wasting more of your time, stops wasting some NHS Time (and money) and frees us appointment slots for those who more urgently need them.
63 Comments
Thank you for posting!
It's better to see your GP and get referred for a proper glucose tolerance test
Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app X2 to see if your sugar levels ok. Go for the free test to see if your sugar level is a problem in the first place. NHS might survive longer if ppl stopped wasting gp apps unless really needing them. P.s. well done posting this OP. Nice.
trojan3425 m ago

Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app …Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app X2 to see if your sugar levels ok. Go for the free test to see if your sugar level is a problem in the first place. NHS might survive longer if ppl stopped wasting gp apps unless really needing them. P.s. well done posting this OP. Nice.


But this is just a discussion/risk screening in the first instance. If they're going to do a test that's actually diagnostically useful (FBG), you have to come back to a 2nd appointment. Then if the result indicates you may be diabetic, they're not going to diagnose you then because they're not doctors and they're certainly not going to start you on medication. Arguably much simpler to get a GP appointment, ask to discuss your symptoms/risk factors if you're worried or have reason to, and they can request a HbA1c test (no need to fast, can be taken any time and is diagnostic) that you can have done at a phlebotomy department. If it's normal, no worries, if it's high, they call you in to discus further. Simple.
Serious question, isn't it free at docters?
Edited by: "snappyfish" 8th Jul
Jumpingphil4 m ago

What's a docter?


IF you cant work it out, try to find one
snappyfish6 h, 7 m ago

Serious question, isn't it free at docters?


Yes. A doctor can refer you on to a nurse to take samples and test properly for free, but it takes up quite a few appointments in the process.

It's better to see the pharmacist for this free screening, and then go for official diagnosis and treatment through the doctor if this was positive.

Stops you wasting more of your time, stops wasting some NHS Time (and money) and frees us appointment slots for those who more urgently need them.
The issue with this is that the poster hasn't indicated that each customer has to complete a risk assessment sheet to ascertain if they are at high risk of Diabetes... these tests aren't "free" the pharmacy gets funding from the NHS to complete them however you have to be of high likely hood of having Diabetes (asks about age, weight, smoking general health etc.) so even though it may be available from age 16 it's unlikely anyone that young would qualify.

it's a good idea that relieves pressure on GP's but if your not in an at risk group and you suspect diabetes then you should still speak to your GP or a Pharmacist to discuss why you feel you may have diabetes.
Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are very high.

There's actually a new KFC opened round the corner, just 5 minutes drive away... And I blame them.

Have a nice day.

Kindest regards
firstofficer10 m ago

Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are …Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are very high.There's actually a new KFC opened round the corner, just 5 minutes drive away... And I blame them.Have a nice day.Kindest regards


You don't catch diabetes, it's not contagious!
firstofficer19 m ago

Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are …Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are very high.There's actually a new KFC opened round the corner, just 5 minutes drive away... And I blame them.Have a nice day.Kindest regards



Best to ignore Diabetes. There are far too many people with eyesight.
Edited by: "GDB2222" 8th Jul
GDB222212 h, 1 m ago

It's better to see your GP and get referred for a proper glucose tolerance …It's better to see your GP and get referred for a proper glucose tolerance test



Not needed. hBA1C will suffice...
trojan3411 h, 51 m ago

Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app …Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app X2 to see if your sugar levels ok. Go for the free test to see if your sugar level is a problem in the first place. NHS might survive longer if ppl stopped wasting gp apps unless really needing them. P.s. well done posting this OP. Nice.


Well considering you cant really get same day GP appointments anymore if it’s urgent I wouldn’t recommend waiting to see your GP.
Thanks
Main factors of increased risk of Type 2 diabetes are:
Being overweight and/or a history of the disease within your family.

Typical symptoms to look out for:
- Increased thirst
- Going to the toilet more often
- Weight loss
- Blurred vision
- Tiredness / Lack of Energy

It may only be one of the above, or many.

If diagnosed depending on what your glucose levels are at, they will start you on Metformin. A tablet you take with a meal. If this doesn't work, then a combination drug such as Metformin and Sitagliptin, and if that fails, more than likely insulin injections.

Another misconception is 'just avoid sugar'. When essentially all carbohydrates turn to sugar in your body. So it's not just things like sugar you have to watch, its food like: Bread (White mainly), rice, pasta, potatoes. Going for the wholegrain versions help as the fibre slows down the conversion of carbohydrates to glucose.
It would be most cost effective if everyone had an annual MOT with a number of tests being carried before seeing a qualified doctor, he would then see the patient with all of the medical records and the recent test results in front of him. Health problems can often be treated more effectively in the early stages. In addition, lifestyle advice and reassuring the worried well is usually better when offered by a doctor.
Or get naked ,look in the mirror, if you see a fat barsteward looking back at you get some exercise,eat healthy and dont become dependant on a drug company for the rest of your life.

And of course this doesnt apply to the folks with Type 1 diabetes which is a totally different situation.
hooray.henry3 h, 38 m ago

Or get naked ,look in the mirror, if you see a fat barsteward looking back …Or get naked ,look in the mirror, if you see a fat barsteward looking back at you get some exercise,eat healthy and dont become dependant on a drug company for the rest of your life.And of course this doesnt apply to the folks with Type 1 diabetes which is a totally different situation.


.... or folk with numerous other conditions, weight management isn't THAT easy, or weight watchers would be bankrupt.
Stop reading the daily mail, and towing the tory line ffs.
trojan3418 h, 1 m ago

Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app …Don't think that's the solution. Waste a gp app and then get a nurse app X2 to see if your sugar levels ok. Go for the free test to see if your sugar level is a problem in the first place. NHS might survive longer if ppl stopped wasting gp apps unless really needing them. P.s. well done posting this OP. Nice.


I looked for a free test like the submitted one recently and found none. As it happens, I didn't do anything, but if that's what the NHS would have put me through then the blame for waste is on them; the process is theirs, not mine. It's a totally different thing from getting paracetamol prescriptions or who knows what that .
firstofficer7 h, 36 m ago

Not needed. hBA1C will suffice...


I've never really understood that argument. Sure, a sky-high HbA1C indicates a diabetic, but it's less help for someone pre-diabetic, who may just need cajoling to take more exercise and watch the carbs. I thought the GTT is the gold standard test?
GDB22228 m ago

I've never really understood that argument. Sure, a sky-high HbA1C …I've never really understood that argument. Sure, a sky-high HbA1C indicates a diabetic, but it's less help for someone pre-diabetic, who may just need cajoling to take more exercise and watch the carbs. I thought the GTT is the gold standard test?



It used to be I think. From what I understand, it is averaged out over 6-8 weeks so more representative, and is less affected by short term fluctuations. Don't they use it to detect pre-diabetics rather than GTT nowadays?
Edited by: "firstofficer" 8th Jul
I'd rather not know... Kindest regards
GDB222224 m ago

I've never really understood that argument. Sure, a sky-high HbA1C …I've never really understood that argument. Sure, a sky-high HbA1C indicates a diabetic, but it's less help for someone pre-diabetic, who may just need cajoling to take more exercise and watch the carbs. I thought the GTT is the gold standard test?


Hba1c has a diagnostic threshold for diabetes and a range below this which represents pre diabetes.
If you can read this thread, you don't need the appointment
RoosterNo12 h, 57 m ago

.... or folk with numerous other conditions, weight management isn't THAT ….... or folk with numerous other conditions, weight management isn't THAT easy, or weight watchers would be bankrupt. Stop reading the daily mail, and towing the tory line ffs.


Poor & lazy effort there pal.
Edited by: "hooray.henry" 8th Jul
firstofficer2 h, 3 m ago

I'd rather not know... Kindest regards


I think you would, after a while you would find out anyway because your symptoms would become unbearable, what with the toxicity of high levels of glucose eating away at every cell in your body.
Edited by: "britboy28" 8th Jul
hooray.henry1 h, 6 m ago

Poor & lazy effort there pal.


It was henry but we forgive you
britboy288 m ago

I think you would, after a while you would find out anyway because your …I think you would, after a while you would find out anyway because your symptoms would become unbearable, what with the toxicity of high levels of glucose eating away at every cell in your body.


I'll wait for that moment.. and enjoy my KFCs until that time comes...

Kindest regards
firstofficer20 m ago

I'll wait for that moment.. and enjoy my KFCs until that time …I'll wait for that moment.. and enjoy my KFCs until that time comes...Kindest regards


Kfc is fine just bin the chips
blueflash3 m ago

Kfc is fine just bin the chips



Tbh I usually just have it neat, and allow the fries... Sometimes have to refry when I get home if the meat gets too cold..

Normally a 12 piece bucket goes down nicely, sunk with a litre of diet coke..

Kindest regards
Edited by: "firstofficer" 8th Jul
britboy288 h, 35 m ago

Main factors of increased risk of Type 2 diabetes are:Being overweight …Main factors of increased risk of Type 2 diabetes are:Being overweight and/or a history of the disease within your family.Typical symptoms to look out for:- Increased thirst- Going to the toilet more often- Weight loss- Blurred vision- Tiredness / Lack of EnergyIt may only be one of the above, or many.If diagnosed depending on what your glucose levels are at, they will start you on Metformin. A tablet you take with a meal. If this doesn't work, then a combination drug such as Metformin and Sitagliptin, and if that fails, more than likely insulin injections.Another misconception is 'just avoid sugar'. When essentially all carbohydrates turn to sugar in your body. So it's not just things like sugar you have to watch, its food like: Bread (White mainly), rice, pasta, potatoes. Going for the wholegrain versions help as the fibre slows down the conversion of carbohydrates to glucose.



Just to clear up some slight misinformation on this thread - I am a doctor specialising in diabetes.

GTTs arn't really used anymore - other than in pregnancy

HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose are the tests generally used for testing for diabetes or non-diabetic hyperglycaemia (the more recent term for pre-diabetes - adopted because most people with pre-diabetes won't actually develop diabetes).

HbA1c has the advantage of not needing fasting but is not suitable for everyone - can't be used in anaemia, 'unusual' haemoglobin forms like sickle cell, abnormal red cell turnover - while FPG can be used in everyone reliably

If you are concerned about your risk of type 2 diabetes then google the Diabetes UK know your risk tool - it's pretty good - and can give you an idea of if you need further testing.

The vast majority of people with type 2 diabetes will not have any symptoms at all - the symptoms tend to be for type 1 (i.e. the absence of insulin rather than insulin resistance) - so don't rely on symptoms before getting tested!

Someone mentioned that it would be great if the NHS tested everything for people - including for diabetes - they do, it's called the NHS Health Check - offered every 5 years to everyone aged 40-74 without pre-existing cardiovascular disease (as they will get all the tests yearly anyway). Take up the offer - national uptake is pretty poor.

Metformin is used first line in treating type 2 diabetes - the other drug mentioned in the post I am replying to isn't used much. There are many other drugs / classes of drugs available before insulin - such as the glitazones, GLP1s, SGLT2s etc.

The most effective measure for reducing risk of diabetes is weight loss. Increasing physical activity is also independently reduces risk (i.e. even if your weight stayed the same, being more active reduces your risk)
chiggy12314 m ago

Just to clear up some slight misinformation on this thread - I am a doctor …Just to clear up some slight misinformation on this thread - I am a doctor specialising in diabetes.GTTs arn't really used anymore - other than in pregnancyHbA1c or fasting plasma glucose are the tests generally used for testing for diabetes or non-diabetic hyperglycaemia (the more recent term for pre-diabetes - adopted because most people with pre-diabetes won't actually develop diabetes).HbA1c has the advantage of not needing fasting but is not suitable for everyone - can't be used in anaemia, 'unusual' haemoglobin forms like sickle cell, abnormal red cell turnover - while FPG can be used in everyone reliablyIf you are concerned about your risk of type 2 diabetes then google the Diabetes UK know your risk tool - it's pretty good - and can give you an idea of if you need further testing.The vast majority of people with type 2 diabetes will not have any symptoms at all - the symptoms tend to be for type 1 (i.e. the absence of insulin rather than insulin resistance) - so don't rely on symptoms before getting tested!Someone mentioned that it would be great if the NHS tested everything for people - including for diabetes - they do, it's called the NHS Health Check - offered every 5 years to everyone aged 40-74 without pre-existing cardiovascular disease (as they will get all the tests yearly anyway). Take up the offer - national uptake is pretty poor.Metformin is used first line in treating type 2 diabetes - the other drug mentioned in the post I am replying to isn't used much. There are many other drugs / classes of drugs available before insulin - such as the glitazones, GLP1s, SGLT2s etc.The most effective measure for reducing risk of diabetes is weight loss. Increasing physical activity is also independently reduces risk (i.e. even if your weight stayed the same, being more active reduces your risk)


Does this count as CPD for appraisal?? Claiming it anyway.
If you give blood do they not test for diabetes?
If you're overweight you should check your blood sugars, there are devices you can buy for £30 quid which will give you a basic test that takes less than 10 seconds. Essentially you prick your finger and place a droplet on a test strip that an electronic reader analyses. I am a Type 2 Diabetic and I'm on Metformin, but since I avoided seeing the doctor for many years, I wasn't diagnosed until it was too late, but at least now I'm adopting a healthier lifestyle (except for the few Ferrero Rocher Deals!). No matter what method you use, this deal, your GP, the home device - Check it, because you don't want to start having parts of your being amputated due to Diabetes. I realise now that for me, the first signs were hot hands and feet, and tingling sensations (Pins and Needles) in my joints which is called peripheral neuropathy. Since I have adopted a healthier diet my blood sugars have lowered and so I experience less of these effects, but unfortunately there is no cure for nerve damage and diabetes is a progressive disease. However I have read some interesting studies where some patients have seen remarkable improvement on an 800 calorie low carb diet (Check the Newcastle Diet - named after the place it took place). I don't endorse it but I have had a lot of success with low carb and intermittent fasting and am steadily dropping about half a kilo a week with it and exercise for 2-3 times a week. Just wished I started earlier, and had know about my high blood sugar. So get checking!
firstofficer13 h, 51 m ago

Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are …Tbh, I'd rather not know if I've caught early diabetes as the chances are very high.There's actually a new KFC opened round the corner, just 5 minutes drive away... And I blame them.Have a nice day.Kindest regards


You'd rather not know? You mean you are content to possibly go blind, suffer amputations of your limbs, have heart attack or stroke and many other very nasty conditions? And inflict your care on your loved ones? When all this can be prevented with some medication, moderate exercise and sensible diet? Seriously, pal, you need to wake up to reality.
chiggy1233 h, 27 m ago

Metformin is used first line in treating type 2 diabetes - the other drug …Metformin is used first line in treating type 2 diabetes - the other drug mentioned in the post I am replying to isn't used much.


I'm going by the USA here, but is that because Sitagliptin costs an average cash price of $541.48 (£407.30) per box of 30x tablets (100mg) per patient, per month? and is maybe a last ditch resort before insulin?
Edited by: "britboy28" 9th Jul
Md19802 h, 47 m ago

However I have read some interesting studies where some patients have seen …However I have read some interesting studies where some patients have seen remarkable improvement on an 800 calorie low carb diet (Check the Newcastle Diet - named after the place it took place).


I haven't read that particular one, but I have heard of similar. I think that was more focused on people who are newly diagnosed?
But anyway, there are all kinds of theories. Exercise is key though.

I've read all kinds of things from Cinnamon lowering BS, to having a shot of vodka with your meal
electriclinux2 h, 57 m ago

If you give blood do they not test for diabetes?


If your blood sugar is not controlled correctly, and I suppose the medication you are on has a say - You can't give blood.
So I pressume this would be checked in anyone giving blood.
renard9 m ago

You'd rather not know? You mean you are content to possibly go blind, …You'd rather not know? You mean you are content to possibly go blind, suffer amputations of your limbs, have heart attack or stroke and many other very nasty conditions? And inflict your care on your loved ones? When all this can be prevented with some medication, moderate exercise and sensible diet? Seriously, pal, you need to wake up to reality.



The way I see it is that I'm doing everything I can to prevent diseases. Exercising , keeping weight down, don't smoke etc. Despite everything , one cannot control fully who has a heart attack and who does not.. a lot is a random occurrence...

Just my tuppence worth..
Md19806 h, 13 m ago

If you're overweight you should check your blood sugars, there are devices …If you're overweight you should check your blood sugars, there are devices you can buy for £30 quid which will give you a basic test that takes less than 10 seconds. Essentially you prick your finger and place a droplet on a test strip that an electronic reader analyses. I am a Type 2 Diabetic and I'm on Metformin, but since I avoided seeing the doctor for many years, I wasn't diagnosed until it was too late, but at least now I'm adopting a healthier lifestyle (except for the few Ferrero Rocher Deals!). No matter what method you use, this deal, your GP, the home device - Check it, because you don't want to start having parts of your being amputated due to Diabetes. I realise now that for me, the first signs were hot hands and feet, and tingling sensations (Pins and Needles) in my joints which is called peripheral neuropathy. Since I have adopted a healthier diet my blood sugars have lowered and so I experience less of these effects, but unfortunately there is no cure for nerve damage and diabetes is a progressive disease. However I have read some interesting studies where some patients have seen remarkable improvement on an 800 calorie low carb diet (Check the Newcastle Diet - named after the place it took place). I don't endorse it but I have had a lot of success with low carb and intermittent fasting and am steadily dropping about half a kilo a week with it and exercise for 2-3 times a week. Just wished I started earlier, and had know about my high blood sugar. So get checking!


Been told I'm pre diabetic for many years. Going for nerve damage tests tomorrow. Hot hands and feet and tingling but nobody seems to be able to tell me what it is. Sounds like you have the same as me. Have you anymore info about this. It's driving me insane!
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text