Freego Raptor Electric Bike £449.00 was £799.00 delivered @ E-bikes Direct
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Freego Raptor Electric Bike £449.00 was £799.00 delivered @ E-bikes Direct

49
Found 16th May 2016
I was recently looking online to purchase a hybrid bike to commute to work, came across an electric hybrid bike sold by e-bikesdirect.co.uk.

At the price of £449.00 from £799.00 it is a good bargain not to be missed.

Despite the 24 volt 5.5Ah bottle battery which can do on average between 10 to 12 miles which is ideal for my commute, factoring in the lightweight frame the temptation to buy one was too good to miss.

It has a 200 watt rear hub motor with a top speed of 15 mph, single speed drive train which requires very little maintenance.

The company also sells the double battery (2 bottle batteries combined to 11ah in total giving you 20 to 24 miles) version of the bike at £599.00 from £949.00.

Price includes free delivery also, great bargain whilst they have them in stock.
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backtothecaves

Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have … Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have a very long journey or you are elderly, you should just cycle yourself and get fit. I can do 15mph easily on my fold up bike. It keeps me fit and it's fun!



Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.
People who are disabled or have health probs use them.
People use them for commuting and dont turn up at work all sweaty.
People use them who wouldn't normally cycle, but then get fresh air and exercise from an Ebike.
And they are good fun to ride without the hard work.

Ebikes are far from pointless.
49 Comments
Two things you need to look at...

Firstly, your weight, not being rude but if you are big hunk of a chap you will be really disappointed....

Secondly there are companies in the UK that will sell you a bike for not a lot more that ignore the silly EU regulations, and as such you will be able to go a lot faster and most of them will attach a dongle, so 'if' you ever got stopped you simply flick the dongle and it restricts the bike back down to 250w

it is called a off road switch

Edited by: "Aeschylus" 16th May 2016
can you ride this as a normal bike as well?
Aeschylus

Two things you need to look at...Firstly, your weight, not being rude but … Two things you need to look at...Firstly, your weight, not being rude but if you are big hunk of a chap you will be really disappointed....Secondly there are companies in the UK that will sell you a bike for not a lot more that ignore the silly EU regulations, and as such you will be able to go a lot faster and most of them will attach a dongle, so 'if' you ever got stopped you simply flick the dongle and it restricts the bike back down to 250wit is called a off road switch



​I'm being lazy, I know, but do you have any examples of bikes like that that you can link us to please?
You seem knowledgeable in the subject
Seems nice enough. How do these fair in wet weather? Are they water resistant or is it a no go in the rain?

My plan was originally to buy a non electrical hybrid (Cube Hyde Race), had a demonstration recently, true to say the Raptor doesn't have all the bells and whistles of the Cube model, however, at the price of the Raptor it's a great deal not to miss, having the extra boost to get up hills with the battery will help a lot. I already have an electric bike and aware of the dongle, thanks for the heads up...appreciated. I'm 14 stone so this bike will be able to haul me up hills hopefully.

Aeschylus

Two things you need to look at...Firstly, your weight, not being rude but … Two things you need to look at...Firstly, your weight, not being rude but if you are big hunk of a chap you will be really disappointed....Secondly there are companies in the UK that will sell you a bike for not a lot more that ignore the silly EU regulations, and as such you will be able to go a lot faster and most of them will attach a dongle, so 'if' you ever got stopped you simply flick the dongle and it restricts the bike back down to 250wit is called a off road switch


73greystoke

can you ride this as a normal bike as well?



Had a look at reviews of the bike, yes seems ok to ride on it's own without the battery.
BraddersJ

Seems nice enough. How do these fair in wet weather? Are they water … Seems nice enough. How do these fair in wet weather? Are they water resistant or is it a no go in the rain?




I currently use an electric bike in all weathers, fair to say I haven't had the electric hub and the controller box cut out on me, the Raptor does seems weatherproof, even better than my current electric bike.
This is a very good deal..... 14 kilos is really light in the Ebike world as well.
Its really just a town/city bike though, with no gears and only 24V it wont be brilliant on the hills and there's no throttle so you'll have to keep pedalling to keep the motor spinning up to £15.5 mph. Short range as well with only 5.5 amp/hr batt, but thats part of what makes it so light.
But you cant knock it at all for the cheap price of £450..... i paid £425 just for an Ekit to fit to my regular bike.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x315/BikerJeff/003_zps9srzkvgd.jpg

The Raptor is a bargain, heat added.

BraddersJ

​I'm being lazy, I know, but do you have any examples of bikes like that t … ​I'm being lazy, I know, but do you have any examples of bikes like that that you can link us to please?You seem knowledgeable in the subject



2 ways, cheapest is to get a kit of ebay and turn your own bike into a 30mph death machine like this one

ebay.co.uk/itm…806?var=&hash=item3ab5e04c16:m:mXFU_-X6zA5W5DR_0qhuCdQ

they do a 48V 1000W where in this country the law is 250W

or you can buy a pre built one like this one

ebay.co.uk/itm…512?hash=item4d44298cd8:g:Cr0AAOSwve5XN2uK

best way is to ebay 1000W electric bike
Biker Jeff

This is a very good deal..... 14 kilos is really light in the Ebike world … This is a very good deal..... 14 kilos is really light in the Ebike world as well.Its really just a town/city bike though, with no gears and only 24V it wont be brilliant on the hills and there's no throttle so you'll have to keep pedalling to keep the motor spinning up to £15.5 mph. Short range as well with only 5.5 amp/hr batt, but thats part of what makes it so light.But you cant knock it at all for the cheap price of £450..... i paid £425 just for an Ekit to fit to my regular bike.The Raptor is a bargain, heat added.




Totally agree, the price is great, wanted a hybrid to help with weight control, plus I have became lazy with my current electric bike, with the Raptor I can cycle without the battery and use it when needed...best of both worlds.
Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have a very long journey or you are elderly, you should just cycle yourself and get fit. I can do 15mph easily on my fold up bike. It keeps me fit and it's fun!
backtothecaves

Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have … Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have a very long journey or you are elderly, you should just cycle yourself and get fit. I can do 15mph easily on my fold up bike. It keeps me fit and it's fun!


Depends how hilly it is in your area ? I think ebikes (the assist versions are a great idea ) . The price of an ebike will depend largely on the price of the Li batteries - the bottle sized battery is currently about £150 .
Edited by: "rogparki" 16th May 2016
backtothecaves

Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have … Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have a very long journey or you are elderly, you should just cycle yourself and get fit. I can do 15mph easily on my fold up bike. It keeps me fit and it's fun!



Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.
People who are disabled or have health probs use them.
People use them for commuting and dont turn up at work all sweaty.
People use them who wouldn't normally cycle, but then get fresh air and exercise from an Ebike.
And they are good fun to ride without the hard work.

Ebikes are far from pointless.
Biker Jeff

Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have … Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have health probs use them.People use them for commuting and dont turn up at work all sweaty.People use them who wouldn't normally cycle, but then get fresh air and exercise from an Ebike.And they are good fun to ride without the hard work. Ebikes are far from pointless.


And you also forgot keeping a car off the road, so much better for the environment and people's health in general.
fireman1

And you also forgot keeping a car off the road, so much better for the … And you also forgot keeping a car off the road, so much better for the environment and people's health in general.



This is true....... and i often lug a load of shopping back using my Ebike, something i wouldn't do on either of my unassisted bikes.
200w is not much tbh?
rogparki

Depends how hilly it is in your area ? I think ebikes (the assist … Depends how hilly it is in your area ? I think ebikes (the assist versions are a great idea ) . The price of an ebike will depend largely on the price of the Li batteries - the bottle sized battery is currently about £150 .



​I wish there were more hills. Hills = fitter quicker
Biker Jeff

Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have … Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have health probs use them.People use them for commuting and dont turn up at work all sweaty.People use them who wouldn't normally cycle, but then get fresh air and exercise from an Ebike.And they are good fun to ride without the hard work. Ebikes are far from pointless.



The thing about ebikes is they're much more likely to get people out of their cars commute wise than regular bikes I find, particularly if the commute is quite hilly.

And getting people out of their cars is a very good thing. Cleaner air, less traffic, less greenhouse gas emissions and a fitter population.
Edited by: "sotomonkey" 16th May 2016
Biker Jeff

Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have … Ebikes make cycling up hills a lot easier.People who are disabled or have health probs use them.People use them for commuting and dont turn up at work all sweaty.People use them who wouldn't normally cycle, but then get fresh air and exercise from an Ebike.And they are good fun to ride without the hard work. Ebikes are far from pointless.


You missed out cycling in strong winds. Try doing 15mph in a push bike with a 30mph headwind.
And accelerating a lot quicker (from standing stop, such as traffic lights).

I've got an electric bike and find it massively useful. It's got all the same reasons people ride mopeds, and more.
Edited by: "NitrousUK" 16th May 2016
NitrousUK

You missed out cycling in strong winds. Try doing 15mph in a push bike … You missed out cycling in strong winds. Try doing 15mph in a push bike with a 30mph headwind.And accelerating a lot quicker (from standing stop, such as traffic lights).I've got an electric bike and find it massively useful. It's got all the same reasons people ride mopeds, and more.


I love the idea of them an anything to get people out of their cars has to be good, but as a keen cyclist they aren't really for me unless say I had a 10 mile+ hilly commute. I think once you've cycled a bit then up to around 5 miles you don't get too sweaty on a flattish commute, but could certainly see the appeal in windy and hilly conditions. Only thing is that in the winter (as on a motorbike) you'd probaby get quite cold so would have to wrap up more than you usually would. It's a good point about the wind effect though, I have a very flat commute to the station but the wind can really whip up and I struggle to hit 15mph on my hybrid into it somedays. Could be useful to get some good Strava times too!
I ride an ebike just because i enjoy it and its something different from my normal push bikes. I can also ride it in places i cant use my motorcycles, like canal paths, cycle paths & tracks. Plus no tax, insurance, mot and dont have to wear a helmet by law.
Ebikes haven't really taken off in this country in recent years, unlike other European countries, but i reckon they're gonna get popular big time here. I'm seeing more & more ebikes lately and when people see the Ekit fitted to my bike, they're genuinely interested in it and ask loads of questions about ebikes in general.
Couple of other things, is the battery easily detachable (ie for charging and so you don't have to leave it to get stolen at the station?)
Also, is the bottom bracket a sealed cartridge?
SFconvert

Couple of other things, is the battery easily detachable (ie for charging … Couple of other things, is the battery easily detachable (ie for charging and so you don't have to leave it to get stolen at the station?)Also, is the bottom bracket a sealed cartridge?



Most ebikes, the battery is locked to the frame and you need a key to take it off..... This Raptor battery is not locked on, but as its small & light its easy to remove & take with you. Just unplug the lead and detach it.
Dont know about BB, you would have to call Freego.
BraddersJ

Seems nice enough. How do these fair in wet weather? Are they water … Seems nice enough. How do these fair in wet weather? Are they water resistant or is it a no go in the rain?


Roof has been known to leak - weak point I think.
SFconvert

I love the idea of them an anything to get people out of their cars has … I love the idea of them an anything to get people out of their cars has to be good, but as a keen cyclist they aren't really for me unless say I had a 10 mile+ hilly commute. I think once you've cycled a bit then up to around 5 miles you don't get too sweaty on a flattish commute, but could certainly see the appeal in windy and hilly conditions. Only thing is that in the winter (as on a motorbike) you'd probaby get quite cold so would have to wrap up more than you usually would. It's a good point about the wind effect though, I have a very flat commute to the station but the wind can really whip up and I struggle to hit 15mph on my hybrid into it somedays. Could be useful to get some good Strava times too!


That's basically my commute, 8.5 miles each way, about half of which is on open fields with the full force of the wind. I finally snapped when I was going full power, getting uncomfortably sweaty, just to go 5mph into the headwind and some guy on an ebike whipped past me at 20~mph.
Tried a couple of electric bikes (Smart and Cube) for my 28 mile commute to and from work before settling on a standard road bike.
Things I liked were that my trip is pretty hilly and the electric motor pretty much negates the hills.
Things I didn't like was the restriction to 15mph before the motor cuts out as it's not that difficult to reach this speed on the flat and then once the motor cuts out you are having to pedal unassisted a much heavier bike than had you bought a non electric one. Lastly safety is a concern with these as I learnt from experience, namely the motor kicks in as you pedal so if you are free wheeling and then begin to pedal in a turn the motor kicks in (particularly aggressively on the Cube) which is dangerous in the wet as I learnt when I ended up flat on my **** in the middle of a roundabout. A work colleagues cousin was apparently involved in a disastrous accident as a result of such an incident.
I'd say electric bikes are for those that are quite unfit, do not have changing facilities/showers at work and have had some proper advice on how to use them in different terrain conditions.

Edited by: "mwa" 17th May 2016
sotomonkey

The thing about ebikes is they're much more likely to get people out of … The thing about ebikes is they're much more likely to get people out of their cars commute wise than regular bikes I find, particularly if the commute is quite hilly. And getting people out of their cars is a very good thing. Cleaner air, less traffic, less greenhouse gas emissions and a fitter population.


I once had a cyclist fart in front of me whilst I was waiting at traffic lights on my bicycle. Less greenhouse gases? I don't think so.
mwa

Tried a couple of electric bikes (Smart and Cube) for my 28 mile commute … Tried a couple of electric bikes (Smart and Cube) for my 28 mile commute to and from work before settling on a standard road bike.Things I liked were that my trip is pretty hilly and the electric motor pretty much negates the hills. Things I didn't like was the restriction to 15mph before the motor cuts out as it's not that difficult to reach this speed on the flat and then once the motor cuts out you are having to pedal unassisted a much heavier bike than had you bought a non electric one. Lastly safety is a concern with these as I learnt from experience, namely the motor kicks in as you pedal so if you are free wheeling and then begin to pedal in a turn the motor kicks in (particularly aggressively on the Cube) which is dangerous in the wet as I learnt when I ended up flat on my **** in the middle of a roundabout. A work colleagues cousin was apparently involved in a disastrous accident as a result of such an incident.I'd say electric bikes are for those that are quite unfit, do not have changing facilities/showers at work and have had some proper advice on how to use them in different terrain conditions.



Pedal sensors are rubish. I never use em, you can just do as much assistance as you need with the throttle. also ones that cut out at 15 are garbage too. most are simply limited to 15 and wont go any faster but shouldn't cut off. Personally I've been using a 750w since 2009. good balance of power and range with the batteries I use. I'd always prefer converting an existing one over buying a ready made one using the cheapest crap they can find.
mwa

I'd say electric bikes are for those that are quite unfit, do not have … I'd say electric bikes are for those that are quite unfit, do not have changing facilities/showers at work and have had some proper advice on how to use them in different terrain conditions.


I'd totally agree with this comment. I've had an electric bike for a couple of years now, it was perfect for building up fitness for my commute. Some days I need the car, but it was used regularly, now I'm a bit trimmer and the legs a bit stronger I can use my normal push bike, so will be reluctantly selling it on. Tempted to keep it as it feels safer in the dark nights (probably, cause I don't have to slow right down to slog up hills). Great to be out on a bike though in this fine weather!
Own a freego hawk cost £999 thus is an amazing price. E bikes are great! Heat from me.
The subject of electrically assisted bikes is too involved to come out with statements such as pedal sensors are rubbish or avoid Chinese made bikes at all costs. I have a Chinese made pedal sensor bike and it's great. Most electric bikes under £1000 are Chinese made and sold on by uk retailers, many of which are very reputable and helpful. How the power is delivered is very much a personal thing, be it via the pedals or via the throttle. There are certain legalities concerning throttles and this and everything else you want to know about electric assisted bikes are fully discussed at pedelecs.co.uk




Edited by: "Boltonlass" 17th May 2016
You might be able to get this for £354 if your work participates in a cycling scheme such a Cyclescheme.

With Cyclescheme, I've worked out that at a sale price of £499 (E-Bikes Direct add another £50 on for cycle schemes because it's on sale oO), then paid over 12 months (deducted from your salary) it comes to £339.32.
Pay 3% (£14.97) to keep the bike after the 12 months, and the grand total is £354.29!
Because the bike is under £500 you pay 3% instead of 7% after the 12 months!
Edited by: "Limitless." 20th May 2016
Boltonlass

The subject of electrically assisted bikes is too involved to come out … The subject of electrically assisted bikes is too involved to come out with statements such as pedal sensors are rubbish or avoid Chinese made bikes at all costs. I have a Chinese made pedal sensor bike and it's great. Most electric bikes under £1000 are Chinese made and sold on by uk retailers, many of which are very reputable and helpful. How the power is delivered is very much a personal thing, be it via the pedals or via the throttle. There are certain legalities concerning throttles and this and everything else you want to know about electric assisted bikes are fully discussed at http://www.pedelecs.co.uk



It is very dependent. But just to add my own anecdotal story. I had an A2B UltraMotor Hybrid 26 bike. Designed in Germany but made out in the far east. It's price ranged from £2000-950 over it's lifetime. It was the worst piece of junk I've ever seen. Everything broke. The battery (twice), the pedal sensor, the brake cut off, the control unit (twice). All within about year. Once it even went crazy and was out of control because the pedal sensor was registering full force without any pressure applied. Replaced it with a Kalkhoff Impulse 8 (£2200), and aside from a pedal sensor issue near the start, it's been working perfectly for 1.5 years. I appreciate not everyone has £2000~ to spare, but I'd advise doing thorough research on cheaper models so as not to be biten like I was with the A2B. Or at least have good local warranty access.
backtothecaves

Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have … Am I the only one thinking electric bikes are pointless? Unless you have a very long journey or you are elderly, you should just cycle yourself and get fit. I can do 15mph easily on my fold up bike. It keeps me fit and it's fun!



Better if lots more people on ebikes rather than in their cars...one day they might even be tempted to get a non ebike aswell as their fitness improves
n3m3s1s

Better if lots more people on ebikes rather than in their cars...one day … Better if lots more people on ebikes rather than in their cars...one day they might even be tempted to get a non ebike aswell as their fitness improves


That's a good point, and one I hadn't considered.
Will we have to build this ourselves? If yes, might order it and take it to a local bike shop and ask them to do it.
The most 'building' you might have to do is simple stuff like fixing the pedals on and maybe straightening and tightening the handlebars and seat. Most people could manage it easily and the seller should help with any problems. You really shouldn't have to take it to a bike shop and Freego are a reputable make.
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