Full Carbon Road Bike with Shimano Ultegra for £699.99 delivered @ Bikes 2U
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Full Carbon Road Bike with Shimano Ultegra for £699.99 delivered @ Bikes 2U

38
Found 26th Apr 2016
52cm frame only . Might be a couple of years old spec, and not a trendy shop to buy from. But I've seen Carbon bikes with Sora components on here at this price.
If it's not up to scratch stuck on Gumtree with the usual "I paid £2k and selling for £700" lie.

Carbon fibre custom road frame with semi-integrated head tubeShimano Ultegra 20 speed with Shimano Ultegra STI shiftersCarbon fibre forksFSA Omega Mega Exo compact chainsetFSA Gossamer alloy side pull brakesSchwalbe Lugano tyresKyte micro adjust alloy seat post & Italia XO Flow

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38 Comments

Very nice.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/40/61/e0/4061e0a0d2efd2eed8dd68cd4714f71b.jpg

Looks worth a punt

old ultegra and not the full groupset, i'd probably pay the extra £100 and get the planet x pro carbon with 11 speed 105.

only ultegra shifters...

mateus

only ultegra shifters...



Mechs too.

Ultegra 10 speed is probs equivalent to 105 5800

good deal when Carbon frame cracks you can replace it with Aluminium one

MAdam98

Ultegra 10 speed is probs equivalent to 105 5800



5700?

rev6

5700?



​Yup, made a mistake there.
Deal is decent but Ribble/Planet X have better deal with full 105 5800 groupset

Pretty Hot - 11 speed is pointless as I've no hills around me so I'm sticking to 105, 10 speed on my bikes. I'd prefer a 11T rear on this bike as it can make bikes under geared.

*chanting* PLA NET EGGS! PLA NET EGGS! PLA NET EGGS!

The PX bike is a bit lighter (8.4 vs 9kg?) and it looks sekushier. Save up, or do the 0% 12 months finance if you would be accepted, and enjoy.

Edit: But, this is a hot deal, a good price for the category
Edited by: "gaijintendo" 26th Apr 2016

Not a trendy shop to buy from?

No shops are trendy to buy from.

Shopping is a necessity of life, not a fashionable activity.

I kinda like the paintjob, not too bad if you desire carbon, but don't expect it to be any better than an alu at that price and remember, if you crash it, you bin it...!

Great price if you're a small enough to buy this.

Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything but fairly basic level bikes: do carbon fibre frames/forks damage easily?

Voted hot for the find and effort.
But personally I wouldn't buy carbon frames from an unknown brand and retailer. Also it looks terrible. Probably better to buy decent alu framed bike at this price.

3guesses

Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything … Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything but fairly basic level bikes: do carbon fibre frames/forks damage easily?



Not necessarily, but, following a crash my understanding is that (short of xray inspection) it's impossible to know if the composite has delaminated/cracked...it's much easier to detect major failure in alu/steel frames. The other risk is that if/when carbon composite does fail it tends to go catastrophically so you get no warning of impending doom! Saying that I've got one and I'm very happy with it

3guesses

Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything … Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything but fairly basic level bikes: do carbon fibre frames/forks damage easily?



I've not got one and are not happy

amazon review seems fair, that was the first thing i noticed, little description to the wheels

5.0 out of 5 starsBest base bike available for the money
By Marcus Taylor on 10 Jun. 2015
Excellent bike for the money, I paid £850 for mine in 2014 they are now even cheaper!!
Wheels and hubs are rubbish, bearings were wrecked in about 250 miles riding only in nice weather, wheels are heavy although tough, ran through loads of pot holes and they have stayed true.

I knew the wheels weren't great when I purchased the bike but they are easy to upgrade, I also run 25 size tires as oppose to the stock 23's as I prefer the handling. Frame, gear shifters etc are all good, I am upgrading the rear cassette to Ultegra to match shifters next along with the chain. 2nd hand wheels cost me £50, much lighter, decent 105 hubs but I'm having some new ones built too.

You won't get a better base bike for the money.

Kallisti

I kinda like the paintjob, not too bad if you desire carbon, but don't … I kinda like the paintjob, not too bad if you desire carbon, but don't expect it to be any better than an alu at that price and remember, if you crash it, you bin it...!



Same is largely true for aluminium, neither are proof of hard crashes, but will happily stand a minor incident, if you want crash proof titanium is the only way to go, but steel is pretty resilient compared to these new fangled materials.

mike

Surprised nobody has mentioned anything related to the Road Tax so far

3guesses

Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything … Probably a silly question but I'm not particularly au faut with anything but fairly basic level bikes: do carbon fibre frames/forks damage easily?



My road bike with carbon fork and seat post, has done 1000s of miles of potholed roads in Manchester (and rather a lot of speed humps), not failed yet, it is attached to a titanium frame so that might soften the blows a bit.

Normal day to day use carbon, aluminium, steel or titanium all are pretty tough, just carbon can fail catastrophically, whereas aluminium will fail more gently, steel so long as well made, will probably survive all but the hardest incidents and titanium is so tough they don't even bother to paint the frames ;-) .

Unless you T a car crossing your path at high speed, none of these materials are going to let you down, I once did this on a steel bike, the forks bent, I had to jump on them to straighten them enough and carried on to my destination, you won't be able to do that with carbon.

I also don't get the obsession with 11 speed, I'm pretty sure someone in the Shimano factory must have watched Spinal Tap before a design meeting, the mind boggles how the old Tour de France riders managed.

mike
Edited by: "mbuckhurst" 27th Apr 2016

mbuckhurst

My road bike with carbon fork and seat post, has done 1000s of miles of … My road bike with carbon fork and seat post, has done 1000s of miles of potholed roads in Manchester (and rather a lot of speed humps), not failed yet, it is attached to a titanium frame so that might soften the blows a bit. Normal day to day use carbon, aluminium, steel or titanium all are pretty tough, just carbon can fail catastrophically, whereas aluminium will fail more gently, steel so long as well made, will probably survive all but the hardest incidents and titanium is so tough they don't even bother to paint the frames ;-) . Unless you T a car crossing your path at high speed, none of these materials are going to let you down, I once did this on a steel bike, the forks bent, I had to jump on them to straighten them enough and carried on to my destination, you won't be able to do that with carbon.I also don't get the obsession with 11 speed, I'm pretty sure someone in the Shimano factory must have watched Spinal Tap before a design meeting, the mind boggles how the old Tour de France riders managed.mike



The obsession is not the "11" speed but the fact that Shimano have produced a superior groupset with the 5800/6800 series....the extra gear is not really the issue..

basergorkobal

Voted hot for the find and effort.But personally I wouldn't buy carbon … Voted hot for the find and effort.But personally I wouldn't buy carbon frames from an unknown brand and retailer. Also it looks terrible. Probably better to buy decent alu framed bike at this price.



The brand, whilst not the best by a long shot, is hardly unknown. Whistle are (or were?) American-based but sold by Halfords, Go Outdoors and Tredz amongst others (which I know doesn't count for quality and will lessen the brand for many).

mbuckhurst

My road bike with carbon fork and seat post, has done 1000s of miles of … My road bike with carbon fork and seat post, has done 1000s of miles of potholed roads in Manchester (and rather a lot of speed humps), not failed yet, it is attached to a titanium frame so that might soften the blows a bit. Normal day to day use carbon, aluminium, steel or titanium all are pretty tough, just carbon can fail catastrophically, whereas aluminium will fail more gently, steel so long as well made, will probably survive all but the hardest incidents and titanium is so tough they don't even bother to paint the frames ;-) . Unless you T a car crossing your path at high speed, none of these materials are going to let you down, I once did this on a steel bike, the forks bent, I had to jump on them to straighten them enough and carried on to my destination, you won't be able to do that with carbon.I also don't get the obsession with 11 speed, I'm pretty sure someone in the Shimano factory must have watched Spinal Tap before a design meeting, the mind boggles how the old Tour de France riders managed.mike




Titanium is not that 'tough' and will dent just like any other frame in a crash. There is no need to paint the frames because titanium is chemically unreactive at normal temperatures and so doesn't corrode.

A bike frame made of gold would be similarly unreactive but certainly not tough.

ebble

Titanium is not that 'tough' and will dent just like any other frame in a … Titanium is not that 'tough' and will dent just like any other frame in a crash. There is no need to paint the frames because titanium is chemically unreactive at normal temperatures and so doesn't corrode.A bike frame made of gold would be similarly unreactive but certainly not tough.



Titanium in bike frames, certainly the aerospace alloy you usually get is considered around twice the strength as an equivalent weight steel, both titanium and steel will dent, it's harder to dent titanium than steel, and considerably easier to dent aluminium, carbon fibre tends to shatter rather than dent. It's all down to the elongation, fatigue and tensile strengths, which in a severe crash those properties determine whether the bike will survive.

I think most people would agree that steel and titanium are the only materials that will have a chance of surviving a hard impact, if you watch early Tour de France footage, you'll see those riders on Reynolds steel or titanium frames often just picking themselves up and getting on with it, it takes a lot to break a frame of either of those materials. On the other hand modern carbon bikes will often simply snap and aluminium will buckle.

Of course in general it's all rather irrelevant if you're in the budget for a sub-£1000 bike, you're not going to be competing and so long as you don't have the misfortune to have a driver pull out in front, whilst descending fast, a frame of any material is going to be fine. Even though aluminium will eventually fail due to fatigue, even this will be unlikely unless you're racking up 1000s of miles for years.

This bike seems a reasonable prospect for most casual riders looking for a racey bike, the easy bits to upgrade are also the bits where it's let down, wheels stand out, but the saddle may not be the best. Old Ultegra is still fantastic at changing smoothly, especially compared with 105 of a couple of years ago. The later groupsets may be 'superior' but if all your gear changes are smooth and instant on the older Ultegra, there's little advantage on the newer groupsets, unless you happen to ride for the GB or Sky teams, the marginal gains for the expense may not be justified.

mike
Edited by: "mbuckhurst" 27th Apr 2016

MAdam98

Ultegra 10 speed is probs equivalent to 105 5800



having used both it isn't. 5800 105 is much nicer, it terms of performance, feel and looks (although i guess that last one is subjective!)

mbuckhurst

the mind boggles how the old Tour de France riders managed.mike



all the drugs helped!

Does it come motorised? Pedalling is so overrated.

hass123

Surprised nobody has mentioned anything related to the Road Tax so far


Thats because there is no such thing anymore.........!

hass123

Surprised nobody has mentioned anything related to the Road Tax so far


ROAD TAX. There happy.

patg2005

Thats because there is no such thing anymore.........!


No road tax disk but your still paying for it .

morrig

No road tax disk but your still paying for it .



Ironically never called road tax (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_Excise_Duty)

And further irony in the fact that many electric/low emission vehicles haven't had to pay it. Just likes bikes. Anyhow back to the subject of the bike...I personally would stick with a more well known brand when buying an entry level carbon bike.

morrig

No road tax disk but your still paying for it .


No... there is no such thing as road tax. There is however vehicle excise duty (VED) which is nothing to do with the state of the roads. Just another tax.

Thanks very much all for the enlightening comments.

mbuckhurst

Titanium in bike frames, certainly the aerospace alloy you usually get is … Titanium in bike frames, certainly the aerospace alloy you usually get is considered around twice the strength as an equivalent weight steel, both titanium and steel will dent, it's harder to dent titanium than steel, and considerably easier to dent aluminium, carbon fibre tends to shatter rather than dent. It's all down to the elongation, fatigue and tensile strengths, which in a severe crash those properties determine whether the bike will survive. I think most people would agree that steel and titanium are the only materials that will have a chance of surviving a hard impact, if you watch early Tour de France footage, you'll see those riders on Reynolds steel or titanium frames often just picking themselves up and getting on with it, it takes a lot to break a frame of either of those materials. On the other hand modern carbon bikes will often simply snap and aluminium will buckle.Of course in general it's all rather irrelevant if you're in the budget for a sub-£1000 bike, you're not going to be competing and so long as you don't have the misfortune to have a driver pull out in front, whilst descending fast, a frame of any material is going to be fine. Even though aluminium will eventually fail due to fatigue, even this will be unlikely unless you're racking up 1000s of miles for years.This bike seems a reasonable prospect for most casual riders looking for a racey bike, the easy bits to upgrade are also the bits where it's let down, wheels stand out, but the saddle may not be the best. Old Ultegra is still fantastic at changing smoothly, especially compared with 105 of a couple of years ago. The later groupsets may be 'superior' but if all your gear changes are smooth and instant on the older Ultegra, there's little advantage on the newer groupsets, unless you happen to ride for the GB or Sky teams, the marginal gains for the expense may not be justified. mike



Whilst I agree with some of what you say, it's not true that titanium (6al4v) has a greater strength to weight ratio than the top steels (953)...

This is a useful discussion materials in bike frames

I do agree that steel frames of equivalent strength (and similar weight) will tend to dent more easily since the wall thickness will be thinner and there's approx a square relationship between wall thickness and how easily it will dent (I.e. if you double the wall thickness it'll be 4 times harder to dent). The higher yield strength of steel is not sufficient to offset this effect.
Edited by: "fubar888" 27th Apr 2016
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