Full HD, i5 7200u, 8gb ram, 256 gb ssd good value despite not 8th gen £449.99 @ Ebuyer
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Full HD, i5 7200u, 8gb ram, 256 gb ssd good value despite not 8th gen £449.99 @ Ebuyer

£449.99Ebuyer Deals
20
Found 4th Jan
Better than the laptop deal earlier as nearly 100 quid cheaper for basically same specs. Cheap build but for the money it is pretty good specs. Not 8th gen which is a shame but unless heavy user this will be suitable. Laptops direct have it for 10 quid more if prefer that store. Both on offer
Specs are below. £6.75 Topcashback as well

Processor

  • Intel® Core™ i5-7200U 2.5GHz
  • Turbo boost up to 3.1GHz
  • 3MB cache
  • 2 cores
Memory

  • 8 GB DDR4-2133 SDRAM
  • Configuration: 1 x 8 GB
  • 2 SODIMM
Hard Drive

  • 256GB SSD M2 SATA 3
Optical Drive

  • None
Software

  • Operating System: Windows 10 Home 64
Display

  • 39.6 cm (15.6") diagonal Full HD SVA anti-glare slim LED-backlit
  • Resolution: 1920 x 1080
Graphics

  • Intel® HD Graphics
Audio

  • HD audio with DTS Studio Sound™
  • 2 integrated stereo speakers
  • Support HP Noise Cancellation
Input Devices

  • Full-sized textured black island-style keyboard with numeric keypad
Networking

  • Integrated 10/100/1000 GbE
  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3168 802.11ac (1x1) WiFi
  • Bluetooth® 4.2 Combo with Wi-Di
Power Supply

  • ENERGY STAR® certified
  • 45 W Smart AC adapter
  • 3-cell, 31 Wh Li-ion
Dimensions

  • Width 38.43 cm
  • Depth 25.46 cm
  • Height 2.43 cm
  • Weight 1.96 kg
Interfaces

  • 1 USB 3.0
  • 2 USB 2.0
  • 1 VGA
  • 1 HDMI
  • 1 headphone/microphone combo jack
  • 1 AC power
  • 1 RJ-45
Expansion

  • 1 multi-format digital media reader (supports SD, SDHC, SDXC)
Warranty / Miscellaneous

  • 1 Year Manufacturer Warranty
  • HP VGA camera
Community Updates

Groups

20 Comments
It's a HP brand. Saving of £50 over the normal ebuyer price. Thing is you could find a similar i3-7100 for just £350 just recently. There's not much difference between the two cpus.
Might want to hold off buying any new computer hardware (not just Intel, AMD too) until they bring out boards not affected by this: theregister.co.uk/201…ty/
bigwillch23 m ago

Might want to hold off buying any new computer hardware (not just Intel, …Might want to hold off buying any new computer hardware (not just Intel, AMD too) until they bring out boards not affected by this: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/04/intel_amd_arm_cpu_vulnerability/


The vulnerability goes back a long way so even systems reaching the end of their life are affected and are potentially less likely to get speedy countermeasures than newer designs.

Actual hardware changes to remove the bug could take a year or two, CPUs are designed a long time in advance. And depending on the solution found it could take even longer to regain like for like performance in some applications.
m.2?
its good spec, so for the price it is a good deal.

However the quality of the product cannot be any lower its acer-like
Has been this price for two months, surely it should have come down a bit more by now lol
I have this exact laptop. Fires up ready to use in 8 seconds.
joeboy225 m ago

I have this exact laptop. Fires up ready to use in 8 seconds.


Agreed, very pleased with it
Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel chips for years this will experience an up to 30% slow down very shortly.

Basically Intel for a number of years have put speed over security and now a glaring blunder in the design has been spotted and will now have to be patched in the Operating System. A software fix to a hardware problem is a bit of a bodge and significant performance will be lost. I think the media are calling this latest bug Meltdown if anyone wants to Google it.

Edit. If you've recently bought a new Intel laptop it's probably worth trying to return it or get a significant refund, the problem really is that severe. I think the latest news is that the CEO of Intel sold as many shares in Intel as he could as soon as he heard about the problem.
Edited by: "omgpleasespamme" 4th Jan
omgpleasespamme5 m ago

Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel …Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel chips for years this will experience an up to 30% slow down very shortly.Basically Intel for a number of years have put speed over security and now a glaring blunder in the design has been spotted and will now have to be patched in the Operating System. A software fix to a hardware problem is a bit of a bodge and significant performance will be lost. I think the media are calling this latest bug Meltdown if anyone wants to Google it.Edit. If you've recently bought a new Intel laptop it's probably worth trying to return it or get a significant refund, the problem really is that severe. I think the latest news is that the CEO of Intel sold as many shares in Intel as he could as soon as he heard about the problem.


I bet you're fun at parties.
joeboy221 m ago

I bet you're fun at parties.



Safe bet.
omgpleasespamme1 h, 9 m ago

Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel …Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel chips for years this will experience an up to 30%


Several of your statements are askew.

The 30% figure came from Linux kernal patches and was a worst case scenario. 5% performance hit was given by that source as a "good round number for what is typical". I haven't seen any Windows data yet but I'd expect it to be similar.

While Meltdown/Variant 3 is mostly a concern for Intel processors, it's not specific to them. The new ARM Cortex A75 used in the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 is also vulnerable.

The names Meltdown and Spectre were given to these exploits by the researchers who discovered them rather than the media.


Processors are fiendishly complex and design flaws are inevitable. Something big enough to make the news comes along every year or so, I seem to remember the last one was in AMD's Ryzen processors, but more minor issues are found all the time. Meltdown is fixable with an update and a minor performance impact.

Spectre is the big news for the industry as that's proof that a commonly used feature is exploitable even when working as designed. Even if it can be designed out of new CPUs it's likely that counter-measures and exploit variants will be devised for years to come.


Neither look like they'll big deal for normal use at this point in time. Like always it's a case of keeping your software up to date.
EndlessWaves10 h, 21 m ago

Several of your statements are askew.The 30% figure came from Linux kernal …Several of your statements are askew.The 30% figure came from Linux kernal patches and was a worst case scenario. 5% performance hit was given by that source as a "good round number for what is typical". I haven't seen any Windows data yet but I'd expect it to be similar.While Meltdown/Variant 3 is mostly a concern for Intel processors, it's not specific to them. The new ARM Cortex A75 used in the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 is also vulnerable.The names Meltdown and Spectre were given to these exploits by the researchers who discovered them rather than the media.Processors are fiendishly complex and design flaws are inevitable. Something big enough to make the news comes along every year or so, I seem to remember the last one was in AMD's Ryzen processors, but more minor issues are found all the time. Meltdown is fixable with an update and a minor performance impact.Spectre is the big news for the industry as that's proof that a commonly used feature is exploitable even when working as designed. Even if it can be designed out of new CPUs it's likely that counter-measures and exploit variants will be devised for years to come.Neither look like they'll big deal for normal use at this point in time. Like always it's a case of keeping your software up to date.


Thank you for the added detail although the second link isn't anywhere detailed enough.

Meltdown is the name given to the issues that will cause the really significant performance hit and out of the two big chip manufacturers for laptops (AMD and Intel) it doesn't really affect AMD.

The 30% figure may have come from Linux devs and this laptop is sold with Windows but that's why I used weasel words like 'up to'. It's a fairly safe assumption that it could be applied to Windows systems too as at this fundamental level there isn't much difference between them. You can't expect Microsoft to come out and say patch issued by them will slow your computer down a lot as they want every aboard the continuous update Operating System as a Service trian for monetary purposes.
omgpleasespamme12 h, 29 m ago

Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel …Unfortunately because of a newly discovered bug that has been in Intel chips for years this will experience an up to 30% slow down very shortly.Basically Intel for a number of years have put speed over security and now a glaring blunder in the design has been spotted and will now have to be patched in the Operating System. A software fix to a hardware problem is a bit of a bodge and significant performance will be lost. I think the media are calling this latest bug Meltdown if anyone wants to Google it.Edit. If you've recently bought a new Intel laptop it's probably worth trying to return it or get a significant refund, the problem really is that severe. I think the latest news is that the CEO of Intel sold as many shares in Intel as he could as soon as he heard about the problem.


Bit of an over reaction but yeah news like this will dent theshare prices. Everyday users won't see any significant hit is by guess, you best keep running benchmarks until the patches are released and then you can see when your 30% goes.
omgpleasespamme4 h, 16 m ago

Thank you for the added detail although the second link isn't anywhere …Thank you for the added detail although the second link isn't anywhere detailed enough. Meltdown is the name given to the issues that will cause the really significant performance hit


Various tests are now out and show very little difference in the vast majority of applications:
guru3d.com/art…tml
techspot.com/art…ws/
phoronix.com/sca…m=2
phoronix.com/sca…m=1
EndlessWaves2 h, 36 m ago

Various tests are now out and show very little difference in the vast …Various tests are now out and show very little difference in the vast majority of applications:http://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/windows-vulnerability-cpu-meltdown-patch-benchmarked,3.htmlhttps://www.techspot.com/article/1554-meltdown-flaw-cpu-performance-windows/https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=linux-kpti-pcid&num=2https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=nvidia-linux-kpti&num=1


These articles are a little reassuring so thanks for posting. I'm not 100% certain of the credibility of the sites as I don't often visit them or know how they're funded but it's still useful information. I'd like to see some tests that don't use synthetic benchmarks. Also some that cover different workloads. They'll come with time hopefully.
joeboy2220 h, 52 m ago

I have this exact laptop. Fires up ready to use in 8 seconds.


What is the screen like? And is the keyboard mushy?
The screen isn't as good as I thought it would be. I'm a complete amateur, but I didn't exactly think 'wow'. Nothing special. The keyboard and casing although a bit low end finish and plasticky are ok. Keyboard nice to use and responsive. I quite like windows 10 too even though I've never used it before. I'm an occasional user and was fed up waiting ages for my old laptop to fire up and that's why I went for this laptop and spec with 8gb Ram, i5 and SSD. It's also very light and even after an hour or 2's use is cool to touch.
Edited by: "joeboy22" 5th Jan
omgpleasespamme5th Jan

These articles are a little reassuring so thanks for posting. I'm not …These articles are a little reassuring so thanks for posting. I'm not 100% certain of the credibility of the sites as I don't often visit them or know how they're funded but it's still useful information. I'd like to see some tests that don't use synthetic benchmarks. Also some that cover different workloads. They'll come with time hopefully.


If you are so sceptical why don't you run some tests on your own and share your results?
Edited by: "MikeMaMan" 29th Jan
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