Garmin Oregon 650 GPS + 1:50k GB Discoverer £332.99 @ Go Outdoors
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Garmin Oregon 650 GPS + 1:50k GB Discoverer £332.99 @ Go Outdoors

7
Found 11th May 2014
Just started hillwalking and have been looking for a handheld GPS, from the reviews the Garmin 6*** series seem some of the best. The cheapest I found online for the Oregon 650 with full GB 1:50k OS Map, was £369.99 fromcyclesportsuk.co.uk/adv…tml
By going through gooutdoors.co.uk and they will beat it by 10%, just had my email confirmation they will give me it for £332.99 a saving of almost £100 from most sites and £37 cheaper than Cycle Sports. Here is details of the unit itself....
A GPS, compass and camera in one; with the latest in satellite access and navigation software, and full GB mapping included.

The Garmin Oregon 650 combines the latest software and GPS technology with an 8MP autofocus digital camera, and also includes full GB 1:50k mapping to make it a true all-in-one outdoor gadget. The GB Discoverer 1:50K OS Mapping for the whole of Great Britain (worth £200 when sold separately) contains all of GB's OS Landranger maps on a micro SD card* in one portable unit, just plug the card in and you're ready to go!

Combining the GPS and GLONASS satellite network gives access to up to 24 extra satellites and means locking on is more accurate and approximately 20% faster, while Hotfix® satellite prediction maintains GPS location even in heavy cover or deep valleys. The 3-axis compass has automatic tilt adjustment that ensures an accurate bearing whether you're moving, resting, or holding the unit at an angle. A barometric altimeter logs your altitude and can be used over time to build up a picture of changing weather conditions.

Power comes from a new dual-energy battery system with a rechargeable NiMH battery and backup from 2 conventional AA batteries - great for longer trips where recharging isn't always possible.

The screen is Garmin's most visible ever, designed to be easily readable in bright or low light and featuring pinch-zoom and the ability to tilt between portrait and landscape views. The screen is very fast and responsive even when wearing most types of gloves. Full track view is a new feature that allows you to see your entire elevation view and quickly move to any point, while future plot uses mapping data to tell you what to expect ahead. Free BaseCamp™ software can be downloaded from Garmin and allows you to view and organise your maps, waypoints, routes and tracks in 2D or 3D before uploading to the unit for use on the go.

The Oregon 650 is also Bluetooth compatible which enables smartphone connectivity via the BaseCamp mobile app, so you can share your adventures online as you travel. Large files like custom maps and routes can also be transferred to other Oregon 600 series units, and the ANT+ wireless capability means you can connect with optional extras like heart rate or temperature sensors to add an extra level of detail to your experience. Large numbers of geocaching GPX files can be downloaded straight to the unit for paperless geocaching, with the unit displaying location, terrain and difficulty as well as hints and tips where available. Caches can be easily filtered to make searching as simple as possible.

7 Comments

It's an ok unit (overkill for hillwalking purposes though), but I strongly advise you to look at Talky Toaster's maps before shelling out for the Garmin ones. Very strongly indeed.

You can find out about them at this link: talkytoaster.info/ukm…htm
Edited by: "Darwa" 11th May 2014

Original Poster

Darwa

It's a great unit (overkill for hillwalking purposes though), but I … It's a great unit (overkill for hillwalking purposes though), but I strongly advise you to look at Talky Toaster's maps before shelling out for the Garmin ones. Very strongly indeed.You can find out about them at this link: http://talkytoaster.info/ukmaps.htm



Cheers for the info will have a look at them just now. Ive actually already bought mine. Im going to be doing a lot of trekking aswell as hillwalking, so will hopefully get to use some more of the featues.

I actually have already downloaded the openstreetmap for uk but I am really looking for something similar that can do 1:25k scale, do you know of any free maps that do this scale? cheers
Edited by: "mambo1888" 11th May 2014

mambo1888

Cheers for the info will have a look at them just now. Ive actually … Cheers for the info will have a look at them just now. Ive actually already bought mine. Im going to be doing a lot of trekking aswell as hillwalking, so will hopefully get to use some more of the featues.



Cool. I hope you get on with it. Personally, I've used a lot of GPS units (I work for a company that sounds like 'Bordnance Burvey') and when it comes down to personal use, I use the Viewranger app on my smartphone.

Sadly, the GPS unit manufacturers haven't been able to keep up with the likes of Samsung, HTC etc. For example, my Galaxy S4 running apps named GPS Status and the aforementioned Viewranger is as accurate (and certainly easier to use and read) than most of the more 'industrial' grade units that we use (and they cost thousands of pounds).

Of course, many friends and colleagues essentially have a GPS unit for any eventuality, but I prefer to spend £20 on a spare battery for my phone, and save myself a few hundred quid. I do see the appeal in using a dedicated unit, but unless you're mapping to the millimetre, then it's not worthwhile imo.

I'm not knocking the deal btw (I added heat as it's a good price), I'm just pointing out that there are alternatives that you may already have to hand

Original Poster

Darwa

Cool. I hope you get on with it. Personally, I've used a lot of GPS units … Cool. I hope you get on with it. Personally, I've used a lot of GPS units (I work for a company that sounds like 'Bordnance Burvey') and when it comes down to personal use, I use the Viewranger app on my smartphone.Sadly, the GPS unit manufacturers haven't been able to keep up with the likes of Samsung, HTC etc. For example, my Galaxy S4 running apps named GPS Status and the aforementioned Viewranger is as accurate (and certainly easier to use and read) than most of the more 'industrial' grade units that we use (and they cost thousands of pounds).Of course, many friends and colleagues essentially have a GPS unit for any eventuality, but I prefer to spend £20 on a spare battery for my phone, and save myself a few hundred quid. I do see the appeal in using a dedicated unit, but unless you're mapping to the millimetre, then it's not worthwhile imo.I'm not knocking the deal btw (I added heat as it's a good price), I'm just pointing out that there are alternatives that you may already have to hand



Thanks for the input darwa, I did look at apps for my phone first but the reviews didnt seem to favourable so I ended going for this. Will also be using for dog walks through heavy woodland which i was led to believe is harder for phones GPS but not sure if thats true or not. Had fun with it today on a trip up Ben Vrackie so hopefully I will get my moneys woth out of it. Thanks again for your info:)

mambo1888

Thanks for the input darwa, I did look at apps for my phone first but … Thanks for the input darwa, I did look at apps for my phone first but the reviews didnt seem to favourable so I ended going for this. Will also be using for dog walks through heavy woodland which i was led to believe is harder for phones GPS but not sure if thats true or not. Had fun with it today on a trip up Ben Vrackie so hopefully I will get my moneys woth out of it. Thanks again for your info:)



No worries mate. Sounds like you're happy, and that's the important thing by any measure

As for 1:25k maps, I don't know of any that are provided free that are compatible with Garmin units. However, there is a great (free) program named Mobile Atlas Creator that with a bit of practice, you can create your own maps at any scale using almost anything. Of course, it may be possible for you to use the OS Get A Map service to select your area, then export it to your desktop, convert it to a suitable format, then edit it in a bit of software that I may have mentioned, but I wouldn't know anything about that (but YouTube does) (_;)

You can find Mobile Atlas Creator here: mobac.sourceforge.net/

Oh, and as for the tree issue thingy, if your phone is on this list (en.wikipedia.org/wik…ion), then it'll be on-par with the majority of GPS handheld units IF (and that's a big if) you calibrate it correctly. When running the two systems in tandem (GPS and GLONASS), then you're about as accurate as possible without lasers.

Oh, the Oregon 650 uses both GPS and GLONASS in case you were wondering
Edited by: "Darwa" 11th May 2014

Looks a good deal

I've had an Oregon 400 for a few years. couple of points to bear in mind, it's a navigation aid and does not replace a map and compass if you do serious hill walking. I always take mine with me and use it in conjunction with a OS 1:25000 map, wouldn't be without it and it definitely saved my bacon one particularly bad day in the Peak District winter before last with zero visibility and the weather taking a dramatic turn for the worse but a good map is still necessary to get a good overview of the terrain.
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