GCSE Maths CD-ROM .....£1 @ POUNDLAND
237°Expired

GCSE Maths CD-ROM .....£1 @ POUNDLAND

33
Found 31st Jan 2010Made hot 31st Jan 2010
Spotted this gem among all the tat on the DVD shelves
Suitable for 14/15 year olds revising for GCSE Maths exams

They also do other subjects but only found the Maths version

Runs on a PC

33 Comments

I hate GCSE's so much. The people who invented it, ought to be paraded into public with family and shot, then hanged. (And thats getting off lightly). Hot deal though.

Think the answer is x = (y - b)/m.

Do I get a free Maths GCSE? (or O-level as they used to be in my day)...

What happened to the equation of a line, as far as I know it's y=mx+c. Anyway, as for encouraging maths skills I'm all for it, maths under pins everything and can be made interesting for those who struggle, after all how would you work out a hot deal without it!! Heat and rep for this one.

30+ years old and i am resitting this soon. Any chance someone will can pick me this up.

Will pay an extra £1 + p&p.

You can blag maths at school, I barely listened all through school and ended up with a B grade xD

Im pretty sure its Y=MX+C and is used for calculating gradient.

Good find though

I'm sorry but c cannot equal b.

According to the equation as originally specified, b = y - mx.

You must be thinking of an entirely different equation where b = c.

Equation of a line



Line gradient m , the intercept on y -axis is c

I think its just a case of where in modern maths GCSE they have changed the letter used from C to B like they did when i did my degree and they changed i to j.

still good price for the deal though

Although numeracy should be eternal, be aware that the GCSE specification (syllabus) has changed and the "new" syllabus will be sat by all candidates from Summer 2011 onwards (so is therefore being studied by everyone in Year 10).

This would undoubtedly tie in to the "old" specification.

If its from poundland its probabily as good as any set of free resources online. Seriously why is this even hot?

I think we are getting the equation of a straight line confused with Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle where b can equal c & b can equal c, but not at the same time. Think this will desend into metaphysical debate if we are not careful!

every parent should get these as gcse time is just round the corner.

y = mx + b is the equation of a straight line in America.

It's a good deal but you can usually get them from schools, websites tend to be better at this as long as you know what to search for i.e. what you want to learn and the questions evolve every year especially now to include more functional skills/maths.

live2giveuk;7707136

every parent should get these as gcse time is just round the corner.




No need - plenty of up to date on-line resources. Try 'MyMaths' - my daughter uses this and sometimes Bitesize.

possibly none of you got the answer as there is no question stated.

brilly;7707690

possibly none of you got the answer as there is no question stated.


The answer is %&*@"!^$%()&*(%^*$&£$%^"%"$%$%&%!!!! LOL!

Joe90_guy;7706992

I'm sorry but c cannot equal b.According to the equation as originally … I'm sorry but c cannot equal b.According to the equation as originally specified, b = y - mx.You must be thinking of an entirely different equation where b = c.



LOL seriously?? m and c are just constants...they could be represented by any symbol. The equation could be y=ix+k...it's only cause the english syllabus specifies it as y=mx+c as it's easier to remember that c=constant

The whole point of the standard 'straight line' equation being y = mx + c (as I was taught it) is to make it clear that m = a multiplier and c = a constant. I'm scarcely surprised that the Yanks don't conform; they don't speak English (and they call it 'math' rather than 'maths' too). :?

It doesn't matter what letters you use, it is still a linear bloody equation!!

q=de + o

is a linear equation !!!

I need two of these, anyone know how much that will be?

Original Poster

Still copies in-store in the STRETFORD ARNDALE branch..... hurry up

plumpton;7706930

Im pretty sure its Y=MX+C and is used for calculating gradient.Good find … Im pretty sure its Y=MX+C and is used for calculating gradient.Good find though



b is the new c.

blackadr;7709822

b is the new c.



Don't you do change in y values over change in x values for the gradient? :thinking:

plumpton;7707034

I think its just a case of where in modern maths GCSE they have changed … I think its just a case of where in modern maths GCSE they have changed the letter used from C to B like they did when i did my degree and they changed i to j.



Did you do an engineering degree? They often use j for sqrt(-1) instead of the i that mathematicians use.

blackadr;7709822

b is the new c.



I hope not, I live on the coast.

grother;7710340

Don't you do change in y values over change in x values for the gradient? … Don't you do change in y values over change in x values for the gradient? :thinking:



Yes, dy/dx

virus;7707055

Although numeracy should be eternal, be aware that the GCSE specification … Although numeracy should be eternal, be aware that the GCSE specification (syllabus) has changed and the "new" syllabus will be sat by all candidates from Summer 2011 onwards (so is therefore being studied by everyone in Year 10).This would undoubtedly tie in to the "old" specification.



not sure at the gcse level but isn't there some variation on the exam content and syllabus dependent on the exam board you school uses. If they are changing the syllabus they will probably be taking things out.

EndlessWaves;7710542

Did you do an engineering degree? They often use j for sqrt(-1) instead … Did you do an engineering degree? They often use j for sqrt(-1) instead of the i that mathematicians use.



They do in Physics as well so as not to confuse with i = current.

xeroc;7711395

Yes, dy/dx



which for mx + c is equal to m. I suspect not many GSCEs contain basic calculus though

Joe90_guy;7706992

I'm sorry but c cannot equal b.According to the equation as originally … I'm sorry but c cannot equal b.According to the equation as originally specified, b = y - mx.You must be thinking of an entirely different equation where b = c.



_______________________________________________________________________

One equation relates to a straight line graph while the other concerns the slope (rate of change) of that straight line?

:?

Some schools just teach with B for some reason. Easier to learn with C since it's the y-interCept.

Also, integrating the gradient (m) will give you mx + C so it makes sense that way when you continue Mathematics into A-Level.

It's just conventional. Like English. You can always use different letters and words but then you'd have to go through the hassle of explaining everything again.

Artheido;7715710

... It's just conventional. Like English. You can always use different … ... It's just conventional. Like English. You can always use different letters and words but then you'd have to go through the hassle of explaining everything again.



Indeed so - so if it ain't broke, why fix it? And why, oh why, do so many people (including 'respected' financial institutions) nowadays tell us that an amount will be 'debited from' an account. :shock: A monetary amount is debited (or credited) to an account, as every book-keeper, accountant or bank employee knows only too well. 'Debited' means 'charged', not 'taken'.

xeroc;7711395

Yes, dy/dx



EndlessWaves;7713121

which for mx + c is equal to m. I suspect not many GSCEs contain basic … which for mx + c is equal to m. I suspect not many GSCEs contain basic calculus though




Thats all we've had to learn at A-Level :? :w00t:
Know that and you got 4% of the paper in the bag :lol:

grother;7717859

Thats all we've had to learn at A-Level :? :w00t:Know that and you got 4% … Thats all we've had to learn at A-Level :? :w00t:Know that and you got 4% of the paper in the bag :lol:



That's almost enough for a pass these days, isn't it?

Best advice I had from 'sir' when sitting my Applied Mechanics A-Level yonks ago was to choose the scale of my graph carefully - as otherwise the point of intersection might lie on the next-candidate-but-one's paper! Yes, it could happen. :oops:
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