Gelert Horizon 6 Person Tent Was £449.99 now only £139.98 @ Amazon and sold by Rutland Water Cycling
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Gelert Horizon 6 Person Tent Was £449.99 now only £139.98 @ Amazon and sold by Rutland Water Cycling

£139.98Amazon Deals
24
LocalFound 14th Feb 2013
This is a great tent for the coming holidays. Only £129.99 with del of £9.99 This tent will not let you down. Only 15 left so get in quick
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Why go camping when you can ship your entire house? Lol
That thing looks massive!! Heat for the price tho
Only 15 left get in quick... Looooooooooool all the people rushing to there credit cards
Original Poster
[quote=diesel_508]Only 15 left get in quick... Looooooooooool all the people rushing to there credit cards [/quote

In the morning
I always find it suspicious when a tent's Hydrostatic Head isn't quoted.
Original Poster
Blasphemous

I always find it suspicious when a tent's Hydrostatic Head isn't quoted.


Do a search on the tent Sure you will find it
youchoose

Do a search on the tent Sure you will find it

I did, there's a mixed bag of results from 3000 to 5000. The point being, when a retailer, Amazon in this case, sells a product, it should be outlining at least the basic information on that product and I'd suggest the rain/water resistance of a tent is fairly basic information.

Given as 3000 here.

Yet it 'was' rated at 5000 when it was posted here 4 years ago. It's rather strange that a manufacturer would produce a tent that is less water resistant than its predecessor.
Edited by: "Blasphemous" 15th Feb 2013
Blasphemous

I did, there's a mixed bag of results from 3000 to 5000. The point being, … I did, there's a mixed bag of results from 3000 to 5000. The point being, when a retailer, Amazon in this case, sells a product, it should be outlining at least the basic information on that product and I'd suggest the rain/water resistance of a tent is fairly basic information.Given as 3000 here.Yet it 'was' rated at 5000 when it was posted here 4 years ago. It's rather strange that a manufacturer would produce a tent that is less water resistant than its predecessor.



Saving cost perhaps? Would you still say its a good deal, I have no knowledge at all in camping
For the size of tent that is a good deal. A number of the reviews mention poles splitting, which is likely a problem with the ones they are selling off cheap. Pole splitting is a huge nuisance, so if you don't camp a lot you probably don't want to deal with that, especially in the rain (usually the way).

I'm looking for a new tent with one huge bedroom so that a family of 4 with their large bedding can fit without disturbing each other. I think the bedroom in my current one is 250cm x 250cm, not big enough. If anyone has any ideas would love to know. Cheap as poss!
pity looked a real good deal but after reading the Amazon reviews ( most up to date ) I think I will leave it - pity :-(
I've had one of these for two years and is a great tent. Living space is a good size. Heat added.
iceman85

Saving cost perhaps? Would you still say its a good deal, I have no … Saving cost perhaps? Would you still say its a good deal, I have no knowledge at all in camping

When you're looking to buy a tent one of the main criteria is you want something that will keep you dry if, or in most cases in this country, 'when' it rains. The tent will have been through testing of its water/rain resistance. That testing gives the material used, a rating as to its water/rain resistance and it is measured in what is known as 'Hydrostatic Head' or HH. The greater the rating, the more resistant the material will be. You should also be looking at whether the seams are taped. You could have a tent with a HH of 5000 but if the seams aren't taped, it could leak like a colander as the seams are sewn together so obviously the material has been pierced by a needle all along that seam. There are other factors you may or my not wish to consider such as the groundsheet. If you want to try and keep the creepy crawlies out as much as possible then a 'bathtub' or 'fully sewn in' style groundsheet is the way to go. It is sewn in right around the tent. Others can be open at points such as entry points. Further, you may wish to consider 'Fly Screens'. Don't confuse that with 'Fly Net', the two are completely different. Some manufactures/tents have Fly Screen (Mesh), fitted in place around windows and doors. Some tents have Fly Screens that can be opened or closed via a zip and/or velcro. It is a useful addition to your tent if you want to open up a side opening/window to allow ventilation (it can get very hot in a tent during the day), but again, whilst ventilating your tent, you'd also like to try and keep out flying insects.

With reference to Hydrostatic Head rating though, 3000HH (Hydrostatic Head), is becoming a minimum standard for most tents now. Personally I'd want 5000HH to have the feeling of security that I won't be woken in the middle of the night by water dripping into the tent. Camping can be great fun (especially if you have children), but the experience can be ruined by your tent choice. Some people buy a cheap tent to give camping a go and never return to camping due to having spent a night, perhaps several nights, getting soaked. It's a miserable experience and leaves many people with the feeling that camping is no fun. My advice would be, if you want to experience camping but don't want to initially pay out a large sum of money, then try and borrow a tent from someone experienced. Also, get them to run you through pitching the tent BEFORE you go. The amount of ropes, pins, poles etc can be daunting and if you get to a site and it's raining or even if it's sunny, you want to get that tent up as quick as possible, having some previous knowledge of how to erect it will pay dividends.

I am assuming the tent in this deal is 3000HH. It's a minimum in my book but it's also not a bad price to perhaps give camping a try and if you enjoy it you could possibly sell this tent and upgrade to something a bit beefier (watch out for horse products though! X) Sorry! I'll get my coat!). Having said that, I'd want to read more reviews of it. As mentioned previously, the tent choice can ruin what could have been an enjoyable experience. If you click on this link, it will take you to one of the best websites for information and reviews of tents and associated equipment. This tent is available at that link. They are reviews given by campers, not by some pompous journalist. They are, in my opinion, the best type of review as they have used the products, they have experienced them.

Just my tuppence worth. Hope it helps.
Blasphemous

Just my tuppence worth. Hope it helps.



Thanks I'll take a look. I only paid 60 for mine and it's great, but I know I got a good deal as friends have since bought the same and paid double that. I don't mind paying more, but I don't need one for high winds or freezing temps as I wouldn't camp then anyway. Rain however would be an issue if I had a leaky tent! I think I would dump it immediately. Nothing worse than damp bedding.
pinktigergen

Nothing worse than damp bedding.

Oh I don't know!
I think this tent was never sold for £449.99 and camel cames says that in Jan 29, 2013 was £127.99, but still a decent price, in my opinion.
Edited by: "vadiro" 21st Feb 2013
Banned
Blasphemous

When you're looking to buy a tent one of the main criteria is you want … When you're looking to buy a tent one of the main criteria is you want something that will keep you dry if, or in most cases in this country, 'when' it rains. The tent will have been through testing of its water/rain resistance. That testing gives the material used, a rating as to its water/rain resistance and it is measured in what is known as 'Hydrostatic Head' or HH. The greater the rating, the more resistant the material will be. You should also be looking at whether the seams are taped. You could have a tent with a HH of 5000 but if the seams aren't taped, it could leak like a colander as the seams are sewn together so obviously the material has been pierced by a needle all along that seam. There are other factors you may or my not wish to consider such as the groundsheet. If you want to try and keep the creepy crawlies out as much as possible then a 'bathtub' or 'fully sewn in' style groundsheet is the way to go. It is sewn in right around the tent. Others can be open at points such as entry points. Further, you may wish to consider 'Fly Screens'. Don't confuse that with 'Fly Net', the two are completely different. Some manufactures/tents have Fly Screen (Mesh), fitted in place around windows and doors. Some tents have Fly Screens that can be opened or closed via a zip and/or velcro. It is a useful addition to your tent if you want to open up a side opening/window to allow ventilation (it can get very hot in a tent during the day), but again, whilst ventilating your tent, you'd also like to try and keep out flying insects.With reference to Hydrostatic Head rating though, 3000HH (Hydrostatic Head), is becoming a minimum standard for most tents now. Personally I'd want 5000HH to have the feeling of security that I won't be woken in the middle of the night by water dripping into the tent. Camping can be great fun (especially if you have children), but the experience can be ruined by your tent choice. Some people buy a cheap tent to give camping a go and never return to camping due to having spent a night, perhaps several nights, getting soaked. It's a miserable experience and leaves many people with the feeling that camping is no fun. My advice would be, if you want to experience camping but don't want to initially pay out a large sum of money, then try and borrow a tent from someone experienced. Also, get them to run you through pitching the tent BEFORE you go. The amount of ropes, pins, poles etc can be daunting and if you get to a site and it's raining or even if it's sunny, you want to get that tent up as quick as possible, having some previous knowledge of how to erect it will pay dividends.I am assuming the tent in this deal is 3000HH. It's a minimum in my book but it's also not a bad price to perhaps give camping a try and if you enjoy it you could possibly sell this tent and upgrade to something a bit beefier (watch out for horse products though! X) Sorry! I'll get my coat!). Having said that, I'd want to read more reviews of it. As mentioned previously, the tent choice can ruin what could have been an enjoyable experience. If you click on this link, it will take you to one of the best websites for information and reviews of tents and associated equipment. This tent is available at that link. They are reviews given by campers, not by some pompous journalist. They are, in my opinion, the best type of review as they have used the products, they have experienced them. Just my tuppence worth. Hope it helps.



Tuppence? It was more like £20's worth!
I have the same tent as this one, it is the 2011 model the 2012 model put a small porch above the side door. It is brilliant easy to put up and big and you can adapt the space on wet days by taking a sleeping pod to give more play space. We were in it in a heavy storm in the new forest and stayed dry and warm all day and all night.
I paid £284 with the footprint and carpet
I had the same model from a couple of years ago. Perfectly fine, waterproof and big enough for a small family. The design does mean it lets in water through the door when it's raining though. We also had the side porch but by the time you add up the cost you may as well get a bigger and better tent which will be quicker to put up (the porch is a faff and heavy).

Moved onto an Outwell now which is far superior but a lot more money too!
Oh, and the RRP is a joke.
Does it float,with are weather you never know?
Original Poster
morrig

Does it float,with are weather you never know?


Was that "our" or do you come from manchester
Not something I'd buy, but it is a hot deal!
Banned
Great price - might get lonely in there by myself though
So 4wks ago, this deal got voted -37C cold....
And 2 weeks later similarly cold again...
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