Genuine Mercedes-Benz 229.51 Engine Oil Synthetic Diesel Low Ash 5L 5W30 £21.99 @ mercedes-benzsouthend/ebay
56°Expired

Genuine Mercedes-Benz 229.51 Engine Oil Synthetic Diesel Low Ash 5L 5W30 £21.99 @ mercedes-benzsouthend/ebay

£21.99eBay Deals
37
Found 23rd Feb 2015
£16.99 plus £5 postage for 5 litres

this is from a mercedes dealer in southend, I have just bought 3 and they discounted the postage.

spec 229.51 is for diesels with dpf they also have 229.5 which is for petrol at same price.

they have several locations so you could probably pick it up from them.
cracking price for genuine mercedes oil

37 Comments

Original Poster

some one voted cold? how much cheaper would it need to be?

Would it be ok for a Bmw 520d
What does it matter if say I used she'll ultra 5 /40 instead
Tried google before asking

Original Poster

It's a thinner oil that 5w40 , what spec does the manual say?

5/30

Im surprised how cheap the merc oil is on ebay in general.

Hot from me as you cant go wrong at that price.

No discount on 3 for postage
But I got several shell ultra at £5 on amazon so use on family cars

Original Poster

Comment

aabarcellos

No discount on 3 for postageBut I got several shell ultra at £5 on amazon … No discount on 3 for postageBut I got several shell ultra at £5 on amazon so use on family cars



As I said I got discount on postage when I bought 3 paid £10

Original Poster

If your car says 5w30 don't use 5w40

Garage charges 65 quid

This is cheap! They also have the petrol engine equivalent

ebay.co.uk/itm…50b

Original Poster

bb11

This is cheap! They also have the petrol engine … This is cheap! They also have the petrol engine equivalenthttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Genuine-Mercedes-Benz-229-5-Engine-Oil-Synthetic-Petrol-5L-5W30-/141513041163?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item20f2d5a50b



IX) already said that!

veralum

If your car says 5w30 don't use 5w40



All things being equal, use the 5W30, but nothing bad actually happens if you put 5W40 in instead. To be honest, there's such a lot of rot talked about oils, you can probably use a 20W50 mineral oil in your car and it will do it's basic job quite adequately and a lot of things, a lot better than any 5W or 0W full synthetic oil.

Joe90_guy

All things being equal, use the 5W30, but nothing bad actually happens if … All things being equal, use the 5W30, but nothing bad actually happens if you put 5W40 in instead. To be honest, there's such a lot of rot talked about oils, you can probably use a 20W50 mineral oil in your car and it will do it's basic job quite adequately and a lot of things, a lot better than any 5W or 0W full synthetic oil.



Actually no. Do not use mineral oil if your manual says fully synthetic especially in today's diesel cars. What you have said may have been valid 30 years ago but not today (even 20 years ago diesel Mercedes cars were very oil fussy - only mercedes own or quantum fully synthetic wouldn't bring on a loss of oil pressure and engine lights when towing in a merc 250td).

Original Poster

when oil is this high quality and this cheap why take a chance on anything but the correct grade and type of oil for your car, maybe after the zombie apocalypse when we have to forage for oil, but not now.
HUKD is a deals website, this is and the petrol version that bb11 supplied a link too are real bargains! if its not for you then move on
Edited by: "veralum" 23rd Feb 2015

Original Poster

Nissan oil link posted by pavel76

this stuff meets sames spec and is a bit cheaper
Edited by: "veralum" 23rd Feb 2015

Nigelhg

Actually no. Do not use mineral oil if your manual says fully synthetic … Actually no. Do not use mineral oil if your manual says fully synthetic especially in today's diesel cars. What you have said may have been valid 30 years ago but not today (even 20 years ago diesel Mercedes cars were very oil fussy - only mercedes own or quantum fully synthetic wouldn't bring on a loss of oil pressure and engine lights when towing in a merc 250td).



My dentist says I should visit him every six months for a check-up and a 'recommended' scrape by the hygienist (£50 cherching!). He's quite fussy about it actually. Now who benefits most, him or me? I think he benefits way more than me so I don't go!
The truth is oil is formulated to pander to the whims of the OEMs. You, the final consumer, have absolutely no say regarding what gets offered. Your engine is not a sentient being. It cannot differentiate what viscosity grade of oil is being used because viscosity varies so much with temperature. Thin isn't automatically good because thin means volatile and volatile means crappy pistons and massive oil loss (any Q7 TFSI owners out there that want to comment?).
Mineral oils have a lot of advantages over synthetics like the fact they contain native sulphur which benefits wear and EP. Funny how almost all trucks in the UK still use all mineral 15W40 and still manage to tow their trailers.

Joe90_guy

All things being equal, use the 5W30, but nothing bad actually happens if … All things being equal, use the 5W30, but nothing bad actually happens if you put 5W40 in instead. To be honest, there's such a lot of rot talked about oils, you can probably use a 20W50 mineral oil in your car and it will do it's basic job quite adequately and a lot of things, a lot better than any 5W or 0W full synthetic oil.


Sorry but do not use any mineral oil and defiantly not 20W-50 in a modern engine. It will ruin the engine ......
Great deal for the Mercedes engine oil !
you need to refer to your car's handbook to know which oil it is designed to run with.

dithomaso

Sorry but do not use any mineral oil and defiantly not 20W-50 in a modern … Sorry but do not use any mineral oil and defiantly not 20W-50 in a modern engine. It will ruin the engine ......Great deal for the Mercedes engine oil !you need to refer to your car's handbook to know which oil it is designed to run with.



Yes, of course do believe what you're told to believe and don't forget to say BAAAAAAA...

Original Poster

Cor blimey this is all getting a bit emotional!

There are times when I know how Cassandra felt; to be cursed to always tell the truth but never be believed. Such is life...

Original Poster

Will it ever end

Have a dpf on my car and have used both 5w30 and 5w40 low sap oil. I actually have 2 cans of 4 litres left over from previous service and thinking of using both.
Both oils are the same viscosity when cold. 5w30 is thinner. So will offer less protection when hot.

I am sure there will be a lot of happy dealers along with a lot of unhappy car owners if all of us with diesel cars with dpf filters put in any old mineral 15/40, 20/50 oil etc. Sorry for all of you non-believers out there but go and do some research and find out just what happens when you put some vegetable oil, 3 in 1 oil, chainsaw lube oil or any other oil in your car, especially ones with a dpf filter. I am sorry but oil is specified for a reason and that maybe because the car or engine manufacturer has done their research and development using just one or maybe two different viscosities of oil. Therefore that is the one that has been tested and passed for approval. A slight difference whether you go up or down a grade will probably not make too much difference but I know that if I put any oil in my car I would be visiting the dealer very soon for a full dpf regen, but then oil is oil right.......wrong it isn't.

Good price for the oil. Does anyone know if this is C1, C2, C3 or C4 spec or JASO-DL1

Original Poster

From the eBay listing get the part number and Google it, merc publish all the oil specs

Looks like it's MOTUL oil and it's category is C3

Original Poster

Is that good?

Smartguy1

I am sure there will be a lot of happy dealers along with a lot of … I am sure there will be a lot of happy dealers along with a lot of unhappy car owners if all of us with diesel cars with dpf filters put in any old mineral 15/40, 20/50 oil etc. Sorry for all of you non-believers out there but go and do some research and find out just what happens when you put some vegetable oil, 3 in 1 oil, chainsaw lube oil or any other oil in your car, especially ones with a dpf filter. I am sorry but oil is specified for a reason and that maybe because the car or engine manufacturer has done their research and development using just one or maybe two different viscosities of oil. Therefore that is the one that has been tested and passed for approval. A slight difference whether you go up or down a grade will probably not make too much difference but I know that if I put any oil in my car I would be visiting the dealer very soon for a full dpf regen, but then oil is oil right.......wrong it isn't.


You should ask yourself the question, how does lube oil end up on my dpf filter? Might it be that the modern 5W & 0W fuel economy oils specified by the OEMs are just too volatile? Add a lot of hotter than normal blowby gas to the equation (because modern engines all run at higher specific power output), throw in high crankcase air purge rates for low emissions, a good gob of fuel dilution and lo and behold you have the perfect mechanism for transferring engine oil into your intake manifold to be burned and from there onto to your dpf. Go Google VAG high engine oil consumption and see what real problems, real people are experiencing using exactly these thin oils specified by these oh-so-clever OEMs. The ultimate irony is that whilst you say 'never put a 20W50 in a modern engine', the way the transfer mechanism works, you may be adding fresh 5W30 but within a few thousand miles you'll have a 20W50 (or worse) in your sump! If you want a clean dpf, sacrifice a bit if fuel economy and use a heavier oil. Simples...

Original Poster

how will a synthetic 5w30 oil turn into a 20w50? i thought the idea of synthetic oil is that it remain the same viscosity thru its use? i have never seen oil thicker on way out than it was on way in

veralum

how will a synthetic 5w30 oil turn into a 20w50? i thought the idea of … how will a synthetic 5w30 oil turn into a 20w50? i thought the idea of synthetic oil is that it remain the same viscosity thru its use? i have never seen oil thicker on way out than it was on way in


Thirty years in the oil industry and too many formulating engine oils and you see this stuff. You would think a multi-billion dollar industry would get things right but sometimes they just arrive at the wrong fundamental answer to things. Remember, even though it's you that's handing over cash for this oil, you are not the customer; the OEM is.

Joe90_guy

You should ask yourself the question, how does lube oil end up on my dpf … You should ask yourself the question, how does lube oil end up on my dpf filter? Might it be that the modern 5W & 0W fuel economy oils specified by the OEMs are just too volatile? Add a lot of hotter than normal blowby gas to the equation (because modern engines all run at higher specific power output), throw in high crankcase air purge rates for low emissions, a good gob of fuel dilution and lo and behold you have the perfect mechanism for transferring engine oil into your intake manifold to be burned and from there onto to your dpf. Go Google VAG high engine oil consumption and see what real problems, real people are experiencing using exactly these thin oils specified by these oh-so-clever OEMs. The ultimate irony is that whilst you say 'never put a 20W50 in a modern engine', the way the transfer mechanism works, you may be adding fresh 5W30 but within a few thousand miles you'll have a 20W50 (or worse) in your sump! If you want a clean dpf, sacrifice a bit if fuel economy and use a heavier oil. Simples...




Lube oil does not end up on the filter. You obviously don't understand the way it works because the dpf doesn't use oil to clean it. It uses diesel. Some cars have an additive which mixes in with the diesel some like mine do not. Extra diesel is injected into the combustion chamber on the exhaust stroke to increase the temperature of the exhaust gas. The exhaust gas is used to clean the soot particles stored in the dpf filter. Because of the extreme high temperature the soot is burnt off and released through the exhaust as ash. Low ash / low saps oils are required for cars with dpf as each time your piston goes up and down along with your valves a very tiny amount of oil is lost which will be burnt on the ignite cycle. The higher the ash content of the oil the easier the filter clogs up. It's a crap system and was a quick fix for euro 4 engines. It's better on some cars than others. I will put your theory to the test that after a couple of thousand miles my oil will return to 20/50. This is the oil at one time was all you could buy so I could sell it on to all of those classic car owners. Hey wait a minute. The oil level on my car along with many others rises because it gets contaminated with diesel that doesn't get burnt and it returns to the sump. Mercs and VAG have a better system than this and if your VAG or MERC is consuming oil then think yourself lucky because in 6 months time your 4 litre sump could be holding 7 litres of oil diesel mix.

Smartguy1

Lube oil does not end up on the filter. You obviously don't understand … Lube oil does not end up on the filter. You obviously don't understand the way it works because the dpf doesn't use oil to clean it. It uses diesel. Some cars have an additive which mixes in with the diesel some like mine do not. Extra diesel is injected into the combustion chamber on the exhaust stroke to increase the temperature of the exhaust gas. The exhaust gas is used to clean the soot particles stored in the dpf filter. Because of the extreme high temperature the soot is burnt off and released through the exhaust as ash. Low ash / low saps oils are required for cars with dpf as each time your piston goes up and down along with your valves a very tiny amount of oil is lost which will be burnt on the ignite cycle. The higher the ash content of the oil the easier the filter clogs up. It's a crap system and was a quick fix for euro 4 engines. It's better on some cars than others. I will put your theory to the test that after a couple of thousand miles my oil will return to 20/50. This is the oil at one time was all you could buy so I could sell it on to all of those classic car owners. Hey wait a minute. The oil level on my car along with many others rises because it gets contaminated with diesel that doesn't get burnt and it returns to the sump. Mercs and VAG have a better system than this and if your VAG or MERC is consuming oil then think yourself lucky because in 6 months time your 4 litre sump could be holding 7 litres of oil diesel mix.



Oh dear. I rather think it's you that doesn't understand. Yes you use diesel to light off the accumulated particulate matter on the dpf (derrr - obvious) and if that was all, life would be so easy.
Dpfs primarily get plugged by metallic ash which originates from the additives in the engine oil (ZDDP, Calcium Sulphonate, etc, etc). These only partially burn to leave brhind inorganic oxides, sulphates and phoshates. Google 'Ash Accumulation on Diesel Particulate Filter' by Sappock and get chapter and verse on this if you need confirmation.
Yes a million years ago you could lose oil via worn valve stems but since positive valve sealing became the norm, this route for oil ingress has all but disappeared. Read the 2004 SAE paper by Ertan Yilmaz of MIT if you want confirmation. The major route for ash ending up in exhaust is evaporation via the PCV to the intake manifold. Thinner oils are more volatile than thick ones and all thing being equal, put more ash into your exhaust.
Yes you can attack the problem by reducing the level of oil additives in the engine oil but these additives are in oil for a reason; taking them out is not risk free. An alternative approach is to use a less volatile oil that's not so prone to evaporating off in the first place.
Yes you can accumulate unburned diesel in your sump. It's not good if you're using 5W30 because you will have a stupidly thin oil (eg a -10W10 oil not that such a thing exists).Too many short journeys and a part blocked dpf are the usual cause. Go for a long fast run on the motorway and that will strip out a lot of the fuel.
TBH, you are free to use whatever oil you want and personally I don't give a monkey's. But paying top dollar for these sort of oils annoys me. You're paying more for less and for a solution that perpetuates the basic problem, rather than curing it. If what I say doesn't help you that's okay but I'll bet there's some poor schmuck out there with an expensive, prestige motor that drinks oil like it's going out of style who is desperate to find a solution. Maybe this will help him...


Sorry mate but you are partly wrong. I put my car into a Mazda & Mitsubishi service dealership for a service which is about 40 miles from where I live. Had no previous problems with dpf light. Brought car home, went to Manchester airport next day. Straight there straight tback, 300 mile round trip and dpf light came on just as I was pulling on my drive. Light came straight on as flashing light which puts the car into limp mode. This means the dpf is blocked. Took car back to dealership to find fault was wrong oil in car !! There is no 'can accumulate unburnt diesel in your sump on the Mazda engine. It's a fact and it's not just Mazda either.

A recent oil change done by me extracted seven litres from a 4 litre sump. This is an excellent design feature ........NOT. No doubt invented by a chemist as a quick fix for Euro 4 emissions and not a motor engineer. Are you saying that car manufacturers are deliberately specifying the wrong oil in order to make themselves and the oil companies rich then please feel free to write to these companies and tell them so because when I did my last oil change having no Mazda service agent where I live now, I must have spent about 2 hours ringing round and googling to get the right brand and then a local stockist who sold the right spec. It would be far easier if I could say can I have 5 litres of the cheapest oil please. Perhaps oil companies could be made to refine a diesel fuel that doesn't emit nasty substances when the engine is cold. Now that could be the answer but in the meantime whist the refineries have millions of litres of fuel on stock then people like me have to suffer the consequences of regular oil changes in order to prolong engine life whilst still having cars that conform to EU regs unlike all owners who have removed their dpf.

I found an independent japanese car specialist who actually thought the concept of my particular engine was a good idea. For him yes as I need 2 oil changes a year when most cars need one or none depending on your outlook. For the garage it's good because he wants to charge me £130.00 to change the oil and reset the dpf light. Luckily I can do this myself now

TBH I partly agree with you. When I got my first car I think there was only a few different viscosities available. Good old faithful 20/50, 10/40 I think and maybe a few others. No mention of synthetic or part synthetic. The use of synthetics to me doesn't seem right but it's where the industry is. All I know is when the oil in my car reaches the X mark then it's time to change it because if you don't it can be a bit frightening when the car starts to eat it's own engine all.

Smartguy1

Sorry mate but you are partly wrong. I put my car into a Mazda & … Sorry mate but you are partly wrong. I put my car into a Mazda & Mitsubishi service dealership for a service which is about 40 miles from where I live. Had no previous problems with dpf light. Brought car home, went to Manchester airport next day. Straight there straight tback, 300 mile round trip and dpf light came on just as I was pulling on my drive. Light came straight on as flashing light which puts the car into limp mode. This means the dpf is blocked. Took car back to dealership to find fault was wrong oil in car !! There is no 'can accumulate unburnt diesel in your sump on the Mazda engine. It's a fact and it's not just Mazda either. A recent oil change done by me extracted seven litres from a 4 litre sump. This is an excellent design feature ........NOT. No doubt invented by a chemist as a quick fix for Euro 4 emissions and not a motor engineer. Are you saying that car manufacturers are deliberately specifying the wrong oil in order to make themselves and the oil companies rich then please feel free to write to these companies and tell them so because when I did my last oil change having no Mazda service agent where I live now, I must have spent about 2 hours ringing round and googling to get the right brand and then a local stockist who sold the right spec. It would be far easier if I could say can I have 5 litres of the cheapest oil please. Perhaps oil companies could be made to refine a diesel fuel that doesn't emit nasty substances when the engine is cold. Now that could be the answer but in the meantime whist the refineries have millions of litres of fuel on stock then people like me have to suffer the consequences of regular oil changes in order to prolong engine life whilst still having cars that conform to EU regs unlike all owners who have removed their dpf. I found an independent japanese car specialist who actually thought the concept of my particular engine was a good idea. For him yes as I need 2 oil changes a year when most cars need one or none depending on your outlook. For the garage it's good because he wants to charge me £130.00 to change the oil and reset the dpf light. Luckily I can do this myself now TBH I partly agree with you. When I got my first car I think there was only a few different viscosities available. Good old faithful 20/50, 10/40 I think and maybe a few others. No mention of synthetic or part synthetic. The use of synthetics to me doesn't seem right but it's where the industry is. All I know is when the oil in my car reaches the X mark then it's time to change it because if you don't it can be a bit frightening when the car starts to eat it's own engine all.



I can see, given your recent problems, that this is a sensitive issue for you. I suggest we leave this alone as we clearly aren't going to agree on anything substantial.
I will answer one thing though and that is are some OEMs deliberately specifying the wrong grade of oil to make themselves rich, I think the answer is possibly yes. Remember OEMs live or die by their fuel economy numbers. Heavier oils give worse fuel economy but might be intrinscally better. Now which oil will they recommend? Possibly the wrong one maybe?
I won't be writing to the oil companies. Be there, done that, got the whip marks on my back, don't want to do it again, ever. Feel free to have a go though. It won't change things one iota but you might feel better.
Oh and for my sins, I also used to refine diesel. It's a brutally simple product and apart from a lowering of its sulphur content, it has hardly changed in 30 years so don't expect it to improve much, ever.
All I can say is do what I do. Avoid diesels like the curse they are. Avoid anything with a turbo. Avoid anything that has petrol direct injection or has a TSI badge. Buy small and buy simple. It may get you there more slowly but it will be 99% reliable. Useless advice but there it is.







You posts make for some interesting reading and I am not being sarcastic. I have many debates with my son and the world would be boring if we all shared the same views and opinions. It may be more peaceful though!! Yes, I am quite sensitive regarding the oil for my car and I do understand where you are coming from. I have had many cars and never had an engine blow up. Some cars have been looked after by the main dealer, some by me and some have never had an oil change in the time I have owned the car.

I used to have an old 2 stroke motorcycle when I was a teenager with no money. It burnt a lot of 2 stroke oil which was expensive at the time as money was tight. My Dad being was an engineer and he changed his oil quite regularly in his car and I got him to save it and put it in the 2 stroke tank. I had that bike for four years and it never blew up. Smoked a bit but then 2 strokes did then. When the bike had done about 30k I stripped the engine down as it was blowing a base gasket and checked the wear of the bores and pistons. Practically no wear and well within tolerances. So used engine oil seemed good for this bike but not so sure I would try it today.

My car has a particular problem through it's engine or dpf design. I have never had a car that gained oil on the dipstick as most of my cars especially 16 valve petrols have used oil, some quite a bit. It's not just the Mazda either it's quite a few manufacturers but I guess in time the issues will be sorted. One interesting point though is reading through the forums it appears that dpf issues on the continent do not seem anywhere near as big as over here in the uk and some have suggested the type of fuel may have something to do with it. I was warned by three different main dealers not to use supermarket fuel in my car yet I thought that fuel was refined to meet a certain standard in Europe and it should not make any difference from where I bought it. Twice though after filling up at a supermarket with a full tank and taking my car on a long journey I have had the dpf light come on. Coincidence maybe but now it's only fuel from Shell, BP or Texaco and surprisingly enough I had no problems.

This will be my last diesel car until such time as the manufacturers get it right without passing the issue onto the consumer. It's a shame because I like driving a diesel compared to petrol and the 50/55 mpg on a run comes in useful.

I agree. This has been an enlightening discussion. First off, apologies if I came over all smug and know-it-all. It's a bit of an occupational hazard. Clearly there's always something new for us all to learn.
Like you I've been hitting the forums. What you said bothered me and I wanted to get to the truth of the matter. It seems to me that you, like a lot of folks worldwide, are suffering as a result of some very crappy Mazda engineering. I'm assuming you have a Mazda 2.2 Diesel circa 2008 or roundabouts? The forums are full of reports of people's problems with dpfs not lighting off properly and fuel accumulating in the sump. Clearly Mazda's response has been less than ideal. I thought issuing a new dip stick with a lower 'Normal' notch and a higher 'X', in a pathetic attempt to mask the problem, was distinctly un-Japanese! Usually the Japs are red hot on fixing the problem rather than allocating blame.
I assume you've already done all the stuff that's highlighted on the forums; got the software updates, got the PDF sensors replaced because they original ones corrode on exposure to exhaust gas. However I sort of get the impression that none of the fixes actually solve the problem long-term.
I want to say the next bit very carefully as to not cause you further grief. I really hope that the 'proper' oil you sourced cures your problem. Alas I suspect it won't. The fact is that Low Saps oils are not No Saps oils. They still contain about 70 - 80% of the ash related gunk you would find in a normal oil like GTX or Helix. Even if as you said, the dealer put the wrong oil in, unless it was an ultra high ash marine lubricant, I'd be surprised if would affect your dpf so instantly and catastrophically as you described. It may just be coincidence that the problems followed the service. Just out of curiosity, what oil did they add and what was the recommended oil you replaced it with? Also did the dealer admit to doing anything else, like software upgrades or resetting stuff? Specifically, did he do anything to the turbo or EGR system? (I don't know if the 2.2D has these but it probably does). More specifically still, did he do anything that might result in your exhaust being cooler than normal? A gummed-up and stuck open EGR valve would result in a lower exhaust temperature and reduce motorway passive regeneration. Sorry if this isn't particularly helpful but I've never see this phenomenon before. Usually the problem is mega oil loss with what's left in the sump being too viscous to measure.
Finally (and I'm sure this must have already crossed your mind) I would strongly recommend you call time on this Mazda and trade it for something else. Running your engine on a mix of 40% diesel and 60% 5W30 must be giving you horrific bearing wear and cam wear, especially on motorways with the oil hot.
Good luck with this. I rather suspect you're going to need it.
Joe
PS - regarding diesel fuel quality, yes it's all made to the same standards and it usually exceeds those standards. Also I know that BP had (or used to have) an agreement with Sainsburys to supply all of their service stations with fuel so there was absolutely no difference in quality between supermarket and oil company. All of it is additised with good stuff like cetane improver, detergent and antifoam; none if which would account for your problems.

Hi again. I think we have hijacked this post !! We can all be smug at times and it looks like I was missing some facts so as you say there is always something to learn. Yes a bit of a let down by Mazda but Renault too had this design of engine and I purposely avoided the Laguna as I had heard of their engines self destructing. This is what happens when the engine oil rises so much that the engines starts consuming it's own oil. This happened to me on the Mazda once when I changed jobs and starting just using the car for town use. You get a warning if you rev the car over 3,000rpm. It accelerates on its own and doesn't sound very nice. My local specialist tells me the diesel goes into the sump from failed dpf regenerations. I don't know. Mazda will never admit they made a mistake but I believe some Mitsubishi as well as others use this type of regeneration. Mazda have supposed to have changed this now on the later engine but I don't know as I haven't researched it. I still remember one post from I think it was Honest John's website from a fleet car owner / manager and he said that sooner more than later the Mazda will come to a sticky end. Problem is Mazda make a really good car. Just a shame they didn't use someone elses engine. It shares or shared the same floor pan as the Mondeo but the engine is Mazda's own.

The garage that put the wrong oil in the car didn't actually admit they had put the wrong oil in but when I went back in to collect the car. They told me they had replaced the oil (again) as it had been contaminated with diesel when they regenerated the dpf. They had removed the egr valve and found no fault. Basically they either didn't know and didn't want to tell me what was wrong. I didn't know too much about this at the time but think they were giving me the runaround. I had a friend at another dealership and soon as I told him my story he said, they put the wrong oil in the car. Coincidence maybe I don't know. Another garage told me it was quite common for the dpf light to come on shortly after the had car had done a major run as it may have started to clean the dpf towards the end of the journey and then you drop off the motorway form 70 down to 50, 40 etc, revs drop below 2,000 rpm and the dpf cleaning stops. If it hasn't cleaned properly the dpf the light will come on. Why car manufacturers think that computers and programmes are better at carrying out these processes are beyond me. All it needs is a button on the dash that operates when car revs are 2,000rpm+, you press the button and the dpf clean starts. It would be a simple operation and would ensure that the dpf\s are cleaned at the start of our journey and not at the end of it. I have had no recent problems since I now change the oil myself and can reset the dpf light to let the car know it now has fresh oil (allegedly). Also on my car the dpf light acts as the service light. It is pre-programmed to come on when the car also needs servicing. Another nice money earner for Mazda which I think is wrong. It should be up to me as the owner of the car if I want to service it or not.

MY car is actually the 2.0 diesel 2007. I have owned it for 4 years now and it has been expensive with extra oil changes but now do it myself. Currently I am using the Comma Ecolife 5w30 which is a C1 category oil recommended for my car. I understand Comma is made by Esso. I found out that the last garage to change my oil who is a japanese car specialist uses C2 oil which is not recommended for my car, however in all the time that oil was in the car, the dpf light never came on. My understanding is that C2 has a higher ash content than C1 so possibly proving your theory. I see that C3 oil is even less ash content than C3 so perhaps better for my car. If I had the guts to do it I would try your theory of a standard oil in my car to see what happens if it clogs the dpf or not. I can manually make the car do a dpf regeneration to clean it should the worse happen.

I am not an engineer but my dad is or was. he is retired now and has vast experience on motor vehicle, gear boxes, fork lift truck maintenance, conveyors and bearings. He worked for many years at Fenners at their research department and I owe a lot of my car diy skills to him. He has stripped car engines and gearboxes down and remember he was always in the garage when I was a child with me in there passing him a spanner. When I was a very poor teenager and couldn't afford gunk or jizer to degrease the motorbike I would buy a gallon of paraffin which was about a fifth of the cost. Although it is quite a greasy substance itself it made for a cheap degreaser. Paraffin isn't too different from diesel in it's make up is it. Correct me if I am wrong. So the clever boys at Mazda introduce what is a good degreaser into their engine diluting what is already a thin oil thinner. Marvellous engineering. I wish I had had the designer/designers of their engine stood with me last time I extracted just over 7 litres of engine oil diesel mix from my sump. I would have gladly poured it over their heads. But seeing as the oil was that thin it would have just run off like water. It's consistency was about the same as milk, maybe slightly thicker. I just hope those additives that oil manufacturers put in had been doing their job. Oh no here we go again !! Seriously the car has done 75k now and still sounds ok and the wife says its quieter with the Comma oil. Going to run this car into the ground so see where we get to milage wise before the engine fails. No cam rattle, just tappet rattle when cold which it has always done. Hopefully the diesel in the oil will help the oil pick filter in the sump nice and clean which is something else that can kill the engine. Have a look at the bottom of the following link. I will be dropping the sump on my next oil change to check mine.

cdn.dk/maz…htm
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text