Get an AIS receiving station for FREE! (Marine Shipping Tracker) - Community Marine Traffic Project
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Get an AIS receiving station for FREE! (Marine Shipping Tracker) - Community Marine Traffic Project

6
Found 26th Feb 2012
I guess this one is only relevant to people living close to marine & shipping areas and have a technical interest in radio/computers/marine etc.,

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Get an AIS receiving station for Free!

We are able to provide a number of AIS receivers for free to any interested individual or company, in order to further expand the coverage of MarineTraffic. In case you are interested and you fulfill some prerequisites, we will provide you a complete set of high quality equipment. You will have to install the receiver in your building and provide electricity and Internet connectivity.

Please note the following requirements:

Antenna: You must be able to install an external antenna at the roof of your building. The cable between the antenna and the receiver should preferably be less than 10 meters.

Electricity: You must be able to provide electricity for the (very low consumption) equipment.

Internet: You must have a 24hour connection to the Internet.

We will be collecting applications from any interested party. Although we will try to respond to all applications, we will give priority to the following cases:

The proposed location is not already covered by our system.

The proposed location is of special interest, such as crowded port, high traffic ship route, canal, point at high altitude, etc.

The applicant has some experience in similar technology and generally in radio equipment.

How to apply?
Please send us an email at info@marinetraffic.com expressing your interest to get a free AIS receiver.

Please include the following information in your message:

Contact details (full name + email + phone number)
Location (coordinates + elevation Above Sea Level)
Type of your Internet connection

Any other important installation details such as the estimated lengths of antenna cable and the network cable. In case a marine VHF antenna and cables are already available, that would make the shipment easier for us.

Any experience you may have in similar activities/technology.
Please include your callsign if you are a radio amateur.

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What is AIS?
AIS is initially intended to help ships avoid collisions, as well as assisting port authorities to better control sea traffic. AIS transponders on board vessels include a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver, which collects position and movement details. It includes also a VHF transmitter, which transmits periodically this information on two VHF channels (frequencies 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz – old VHF channels 87 & 88) and make this data available to the public domain. Other vessels or base stations are able to receive this information, process it using special software and display vessels locations on a chart plotter or on a computer.

Go here to view the live map marinetraffic.com/ais…spx

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I also understand there are apps on the Android and iPhone that can use this tracking information to feed live marine traffic to your smartphone, although these apps may not be free!

6 Comments

Original Poster

I'm currently tracking the Oceana around the Isle of White after seeing my brother off on his cruise!

CLICK HERE FOR LIVE MAP

http://www.gogeo.ac.uk/img//logos/marinetraffic.jpg

About the Marine Traffic project
This web site is part of an academic, open, community-based project. It is dedicated in collecting and presenting data which are exploited in research areas, such as:
- Study of marine telecommunications in respect of efficiency and propagation parameters
- Simulation of vessel movements in order to contribute to the safety of navigation and to cope with critical incidents
- Interactive information systems design
- Design of databases providing real-time information
- Statistical processing of ports traffic with applications in operational research
- Design of models for the spotting of the origin of a pollution
- Design of efficient algorithms for sea path evaluation and for determining the estimated time of ship arrivals
- Correlation of the collected information with weather data
- Cooperation with Institutes dedicated in the protection of the environment
It provides free real-time information to the public, about ship movements and ports, mainly across the coast-lines of many countries around the world. The project is currently hosted by the Department of Product and Systems Design Engineering, University of the Aegean, Greece. The initial data collection is based on the Automatic Identification System (AIS). We are constantly looking for partners to take part in the community. They will have to install an AIS receiver and share the data of their area with us, in order to cover more areas and ports around the world.

How the vessels positions are recorded?
The system is based on AIS (Automatic Identification System). As from December 2004, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) requires all vessels over 299GT to carry an AIS transponder on board, which transmits their position, speed and course, among some other static information, such as vessel’s name, dimensions and voyage details.
References:
Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wik…tem

What is AIS?
AIS is initially intended to help ships avoid collisions, as well as assisting port authorities to better control sea traffic. AIS transponders on board vessels include a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver, which collects position and movement details. It includes also a VHF transmitter, which transmits periodically this information on two VHF channels (frequencies 161.975 MHz and 162.025 MHz – old VHF channels 87 & 88) and make this data available to the public domain. Other vessels or base stations are able to receive this information, process it using special software and display vessels locations on a chart plotter or on a computer.

What is the range AIS covers?
Normally, vessels with an AIS receiver connected to an external antenna placed on 15 meters above sea level, will receive AIS information within a range of 15-20 nautical miles. Base stations at a higher elevation, may extend the range up to 40-60 nm, even behind remote mountains, depending on elevation, antenna type, obstacles around antenna and weather conditions. The most important factor for better reception is the elevation of the base station antenna. The higher, the better. We have seen vessels 200 nm away, with a small portable antenna placed on an island mountain on 700 meters altitude! Our base stations cover fully a range of 40 miles and periodically receive information from some more distant vessels.

How is the data collected?
Our base stations are equipped with an AIS receiver, a PC and an Internet connection. The AIS unit receives data, which are processed by simple software on the PC and then sent to a central database by means of a ‘web service’. This software is free for anyone interested, under a GNU license. (Read section 'Cover your Area' for more information on how to install your own AIS base station).

Data received by the AIS unit are encoded in NMEA sentences (64-bit plain text). A sample is shown below:
!AIVDM,1,1,,B,1INS<8@P001cnWFEdSmh00bT0000,0*38

Messages include the following three basic types:
1. Dynamic Information, such as vessel’s position, speed, current status, course and rate of turn.
2. Static Information, such as vessel’ name, IMO number, MMSI number, dimensions.
3. Voyage-specific Information, such as destination, ETA and draught.


Edited by: "antdav" 26th Feb 2012

Original Poster

http://localh0st.pl/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/marine-traffic-com1.jpg
http://localh0st.pl/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/marine-traffic-02.jpg
Edited by: "antdav" 26th Feb 2012

wow!

Sort of "toy" I would love for a few days - it looks totaly fab but of no real use to me other than showing off to mates! I will pass, but this must be a scorcher for some people.

Had this for sometime and its good if you are into shipping.For those into aeroplanes should use this

beta.flightradar24.com/

I want one
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