Gigabyte J1800 Motherboard with Integrated Celeron CPU  - dabs - £49 inc delivery
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Gigabyte J1800 Motherboard with Integrated Celeron CPU - dabs - £49 inc delivery

68
Found 29th Mar 2014
This is a Gigabyte motherboard with an integrated Intel Celeron Bay Trail J1800 CPU in a mini ITX form factor (although it will probably fit into almost all computer cases anyway).

The CPU is about as fast as an old Core2 Duo but is much more power efficient such that it's a completely fanless and silent design. It also comes with an integrated Intel HD Graphics GPU easily capable of 1080p video.

Some key features:

- Has 5 USB ports, one of them a USB 3.0
- Gigabit LAN
- HDMI out

This will be great as an upgrade for someone whose PC is currently running XP and is looking to upgrade to Windows 8 but their PC isn't up to the task. This is a simple upgrade, just swap out the old motherboard, put this one in and hook up the wires and you've given your old PC a whole new lease of life for less than £50!

mini ITX form factor
- cigbunt

Built-in Intel® Celeron™ J1800 (2.41 GHz) Dual-Core processor
GIGABYTE Ultra Durable™ Technology
All Solid Capacitors with Humidity Protection New Glass Fabric PCB design
LAN with high ESD Protection
HDMI, D-SUB ports on rear panel
USB 3.0 port with GIGABYTE 3x USB power
GIGABYTE On/Off Charge™ for USB devices
Mini PCI-E expansion slot supports wireless networking cards
- Zico

68 Comments

ha ha
"This is a simple upgrade, just swap out the old motherboard"

- Im sure your average xp user could do this

should add its a mini ITX form factor

cigbunt

should add its a mini ITX form factor



lol, and also that you'll need to buy some laptop-style (SO DIMM - DDR3, DDR3L , non-ECC) ram for it

There's no PCI-E x16 slot so if you have a graphics card it won't fit.

Saying that, if you have a graphics card you probably won't want this CPU

Is there any IDE support on the mo-bo? or would this old xp machine also need a new HDD or IDE controller adding too?

Original Poster

Koocha

There's no PCI-E x16 slot so if you have a graphics card it won't … There's no PCI-E x16 slot so if you have a graphics card it won't fit.Saying that, if you have a graphics card you probably won't want this CPU



It does have a decently powered integrated graphic though. It's not really designed for gaming more so for casual users who need it for watching HD netflix, 1080p youtube videos, skype calling etc.

It's the same graphics card you get in the core i3/i5/i7 haswell series (HD 4000) and is even capable of light gaming. I've played LEGO Batman 2 on my HD 3000 laptop at 720p without a hitch.

Not bad if you have some spare hardware kicking about to use with it but if you plan on scratch building an ITX system it would work out a lot cheaper buying a Micro Server.

I have this board and it's brilliant. All you need is a case (Antec ISK 110 or Chieftec IX-0#) , some RAM (must be low-power DDR3 SODIMM!) and a small hard drive or SSD. The PC is completely fanless, hardly costs anything and is very speedy. Indeed, mine boots Windows 8.1 in 4 secs.

Something that may be important for people is that it fully supports Intel QuickSync, and it is one of the few non-core processors that do. This means that if you are in the business of converting movies using e.g. Handbrake it will be blazing fast (I'm talking half an hour for a Blu-ray in 1080p). Also, it means that just about any H.264 movies should play without a hitch if you want to use it as a media center.

kvaruni

I have this board and it's brilliant. All you need is a case (Antec ISK … I have this board and it's brilliant. All you need is a case (Antec ISK 110 or Chieftec IX-0#) , some RAM (must be low-power DDR3 SODIMM!) and a small hard drive or SSD. The PC is completely fanless, hardly costs anything and is very speedy. Indeed, mine boots Windows 8.1 in 4 secs.Something that may be important for people is that it fully supports Intel QuickSync, and it is one of the few non-core processors that do. This means that if you are in the business of converting movies using e.g. Handbrake it will be blazing fast (I'm talking half an hour for a Blu-ray in 1080p). Also, it means that just about any H.264 movies should play without a hitch if you want to use it as a media center.




4 seconds? Video or it didn't happen.

I presume you don't mean a cold boot. Most computers take longer than 4 seconds to clear the POST screen....
Edited by: "xeroc" 29th Mar 2014

Built-in Intel® Celeron™ J1800 (2.41 GHz) Dual-Core processorGIGABYTE Ul … Built-in Intel® Celeron™ J1800 (2.41 GHz) Dual-Core processorGIGABYTE Ultra Durable™ TechnologyAll Solid Capacitors with Humidity Protection New Glass Fabric PCB designLAN with high ESD ProtectionHDMI, D-SUB ports on rear panelUSB 3.0 port with GIGABYTE 3x USB powerGIGABYTE On/Off Charge™ for USB devicesMini PCI-E expansion slot supports wireless networking cards


Edited by: "Leftfield_2k2" 29th Mar 2014

xeroc

4 seconds? Video or it didn't happen.I presume you don't mean a cold … 4 seconds? Video or it didn't happen.I presume you don't mean a cold boot. Most computers take longer than 4 seconds to clear the POST screen....



A cold boot, from power supply unplugged. Don't forget, it has an SSD. Otherwise, it has a clean install of Windows 8.1, is set to automatically log me in and has all the programs installed that I need for converting movies. No other junk whatsoever that could boggle it down, unlike your typical Medion or Acer PC ... . The 4 sec is literally from pressing power button until seeing Metro UI.

edit: and Windows agrees: "Last BIOS time: 3.9 sec" in Task Manager.
Edited by: "kvaruni" 29th Mar 2014

Would this be able to transcode 1080 movies for plex.

is this faster than my ancient amd athlon x II 5500 computer?

ta

BlownGasketBob

lol, and also that you'll need to buy some laptop-style (SO DIMM - DDR3, … lol, and also that you'll need to buy some laptop-style (SO DIMM - DDR3, DDR3L , non-ECC) ram for it

Yes, and the manual [ http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_ga-j1800n-d2h_e.pdf] specifies 1.35Volt memory. Not sure how important that is?

pete_l

http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_ga-j1800n-d2h_e.pdf][/url] specifies 1.35Volt memory. Not sure how important that is?



well, very :). It won't boot without. Luckily, price is exactly the same, at least when I bought mine. I'm using these: kingstonmemorycards.co.uk/ind…160 which also have free delivery.

kvaruni

A cold boot, from power supply unplugged. Don't forget, it has an SSD. … A cold boot, from power supply unplugged. Don't forget, it has an SSD. Otherwise, it has a clean install of Windows 8.1, is set to automatically log me in and has all the programs installed that I need for converting movies. No other junk whatsoever that could boggle it down, unlike your typical Medion or Acer PC ... . The 4 sec is literally from pressing power button until seeing Metro UI. edit: and Windows agrees: "Last BIOS time: 3.9 sec" in Task Manager.



According to a quick google, the last BIOS time (as I anticipated) is the amount of time taken to clear the BIOS before Windows files begin loading from the SSD. So total boot time is "Last BIOS time" plus "Windows loading time"

Microsoft stated that Windows 8 can boot in 7 seconds, so if you got 4 seconds I'd love to know what SSD you're using!

Also, you're using this for transcoding? Must take forever :P
Edited by: "xeroc" 29th Mar 2014

Original Poster

Savvy1

is this faster than my ancient amd athlon x II 5500 computer?ta



It should be at least on par if not maybe up to 40/50% faster. Plus the graphics card is very good and it has USB 3.0.

All while using so much less power it doesn't require a fan so it's completely silent (if you use an SSD).

xeroc

According to a quick google, the last BIOS time (as I anticipated) is the … According to a quick google, the last BIOS time (as I anticipated) is the amount of time taken to clear the BIOS before Windows files begin loading from the SSD. So total boot time is "Last BIOS time" plus "Windows loading time"



yep, I would assume that it is the time from start until the window login screen appears. At least, that is my experience. Then another half a second or so to perform the login automatically. Nothing loads in the background during login, except for Synergy (to control PC with macbook mouse and keyboard).

xeroc

Microsoft stated that Windows 8 can boot in 7 seconds, so if you got 4 … Microsoft stated that Windows 8 can boot in 7 seconds, so if you got 4 seconds I'd love to know what SSD you're using!



Nothing special, really, just a Kingston V300 64GB.

xeroc

Also, you're using this for transcoding? Must take forever :P


You need a lot of convincing, don't you? No worries, look for yourself: forum.handbrake.fr/vie…724 . Using QSV encoding 1080p to 1080p is anywhere between 60fps - 80fps, so about three times as fast as real time. In fact, the latest drivers seem to bump it up another notch and latest Blu-rays I transcoded (Game of Thrones, FYI) were around 100fps.

xeroc

According to a quick google, the last BIOS time (as I anticipated) is … According to a quick google, the last BIOS time (as I anticipated) is the amount of time taken to clear the BIOS before Windows files begin loading from the SSD. So total boot time is "Last BIOS time" plus "Windows loading time"

xeroc

Microsoft stated that Windows 8 can boot in 7 seconds, so if you got 4 … Microsoft stated that Windows 8 can boot in 7 seconds, so if you got 4 seconds I'd love to know what SSD you're using!

xeroc

Also, you're using this for transcoding? Must take forever :P



Thank you for your informative response

Soon these motherboards will have a 19V laptop socket so you won't have to buy a traditional PSU if you have a laptop PSU. Then the case can be much smaller and the computer more portable. The benefit of low power CPUs.

xeroc

I presume you don't mean a cold boot. Most computers take longer than 4 … I presume you don't mean a cold boot. Most computers take longer than 4 seconds to clear the POST screen....



POST screen? That died with the last few chipset generations.
It's called Fastboot: youtube.com/wat…yxI

dearley1231

Soon these motherboards will have a 19V laptop socket so you won't have … Soon these motherboards will have a 19V laptop socket so you won't have to buy a traditional PSU if you have a laptop PSU. Then the case can be much smaller and the computer more portable. The benefit of low power CPUs.



to do that they'd need voltage regulators on the mo-bo, (so your hdd can have 12v and your USB can have 5V etc) this would mean when they fail you need to replace the board instead of the psu. Im not convinced running it of a laptop power brick would be all that better.

Does this load windows straight out the box?or is there any faffing around to update bios first?
Do you know which bios version?

I'd like to get one of these boards to put it in an HD Plex H1.S case:
hd-plex.com/hdp…es/
But I can't work out from the Gigabyte page how I'd supply power to the board.
I've never built a PC before, but I'm guessing I'd have to buy one of the power supplies Plex offers rather than an external one?
I'd rather have an external PS to help minimise any potential RFI, but I confess that I'm uncertain whether it would really help much.
Can anyone here advise?

Oh, and thanks for the deal oonderwear!

dearley1231

Soon these motherboards will have a 19V laptop socket so you won't have … Soon these motherboards will have a 19V laptop socket so you won't have to buy a traditional PSU if you have a laptop PSU. Then the case can be much smaller and the computer more portable. The benefit of low power CPUs.



You can already get motherboards with laptop style sockets, they are called thin-ITX form factor and among others Gigabyte and Asus make them. They both have them for haswell based cpus, and they fit mini-ITX cases, but allow more space as there is no psu and the motherboard components are thinner.

I haven't seen one for this CPU yet, but would be a good fit for it.
Edited by: "smoothify" 29th Mar 2014

Although not in the market for one of these, if I were, I would wait a little while for the J1900 based boards to appear in the UK as they are quad-core instead of the dual-core that the J1800 has.

TCB offering 2% cashback

nomnomnomnom

POST screen? That died with the last few chipset generations.It's called … POST screen? That died with the last few chipset generations.It's called Fastboot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTyTKOCnyxI



Apologies, I didn't mean the physical 'screen' as my comment would suggest. I just meant POST operations, which of course still are required to run even with Fastboot enabled.

Please read through the reviews before buying:
newegg.com/Pro…688

It isnt smooth sailing and it seems that it only supports windows 8 (which is strange).

Levafut

Although not in the market for one of these, if I were, I would wait a … Although not in the market for one of these, if I were, I would wait a little while for the J1900 based boards to appear in the UK as they are quad-core instead of the dual-core that the J1800 has.



Do you mean this one Amazon for £95.54 or this one Kikatek for £76.44 (special order)
Edited by: "computerdog" 29th Mar 2014

xeroc

4 seconds? Video or it didn't happen.I presume you don't mean a cold … 4 seconds? Video or it didn't happen.I presume you don't mean a cold boot. Most computers take longer than 4 seconds to clear the POST screen....



My win 8.1 laptop is asking for a password as soon as the kids opens, perhaps you heed updating rather than videos.

computerdog

Do you mean this one Amazon for £95.54 or this one Kikatek for £76.44



Ignore the kikatek link.. I didn't realize it said special order....

I'm trying to confirm this but the power consumption seems *really* low on this thing - the article claims "In its entirety it has a TDP of only 10 Watts" - tomshardware.com/new…tml

If it's a device that runs 24/7 this can add up to a substantial saving; I've been running low power ESXi configurations for quite a few years now as well as a dedicated firewall box, for the latter I replaced an old P3-866 with a 2.5" HDD and 4 NICs with an Atom D-525 based board that had 4 onboard NICs; power consumption dropped from 60-70w at the wall to about 20w, my power bills were measurably down in the first month.

Does anyone know what the at-the-wall power consumption of this thing in a conservative rig would be (e.g. 8gig ram, single 5400rpm drive, perhaps running 24/7 as a small scale VM host)? The new 1900 sounds interesting too.

The CPU has a TDP of 10 watts, not the motherboard and CPU.

ark.intel.com/pro…GHz

xeroc

Apologies, I didn't mean the physical 'screen' as my comment would … Apologies, I didn't mean the physical 'screen' as my comment would suggest. I just meant POST operations, which of course still are required to run even with Fastboot enabled.



The POST under UEFI is quite different to the traditional legacy POST. Older POST methods would physically probe most of the devices and make its way through the sequence sequentially. Under UEFI it will mostly assume the hardware hasn't changed since the last time and do very minimal checks (it's actually more of a quick PnP probe on the bus and then a hashcheck against the last value).
So sure, it has a "POST" like almost anything with firmware, but fastboot changes the way it works a *lot*.

I checked the manual and as expected this motherboard supports Secure Boot, which means it's an ideal candidate for Windows 8.1 if you want a Windows system as it will boot up a lot quicker than CSM non UEFI boot.

Here's a guide to making a GPT formatted installation USB stick >

tipsandtricksforum.com/thr…tml
Edited by: "fishmaster" 29th Mar 2014

any cheap & cheerful build suggestions pls for a mild user

e.g. windows 7/8.1 for browsing, skype, max. 1080p video play and occasional ms office

can this spare 8GB module used in this one?
(CT2KIT102464BF1339)
2-8GB 1GX64 DDR3 1333 SODIMM 204-PIN 1.35V

thanks
Edited by: "foxabcd1234" 5th Apr 2014

nomnomnomnom

The POST under UEFI is quite different to the traditional legacy POST. … The POST under UEFI is quite different to the traditional legacy POST. Older POST methods would physically probe most of the devices and make its way through the sequence sequentially. Under UEFI it will mostly assume the hardware hasn't changed since the last time and do very minimal checks (it's actually more of a quick PnP probe on the bus and then a hashcheck against the last value).So sure, it has a "POST" like almost anything with firmware, but fastboot changes the way it works a *lot*.



Thanks for your post, but this didn't add anything to my already existing knowledge.

My original point was about it taking more than 4 seconds to clear this stage from a cold boot. In the example given by another poster, it took 3.9seconds for Windows to *start* to load. Though, it seems contentious about what the task manager value actually means. My own computer boots in about 8.5seconds from button push to desktop. 4 seconds seemed very fast from a cold boot!
Edited by: "xeroc" 29th Mar 2014

xeroc

Thanks for your post, but this didn't add anything to my already existing … Thanks for your post, but this didn't add anything to my already existing knowledge.



I apologise and will run all my future posts past you just in case you already have it in your memory banks.
In the mean time, hopefully others will find it interesting.
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