Gigabyte Z270P-D3 Intel Socket 1151 Motherboard, £69.99 from Ebuyer
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Gigabyte Z270P-D3 Intel Socket 1151 Motherboard, £69.99 from Ebuyer

18
Found 13th Mar
Includes delivery.
  • Supports 7th/6th Generation Intel Core Processors
  • 4 x DDR4 DIMM sockets supporting up to 64 GB of system memory
  • Intel GbE LAN chipset;L3 cache varies with CPU
  • Support for AMD Quad-GPU CrossFireX and 2-Way AMD CrossFire technologies
  • Support for 7th and 6th generation Intel® CoreTM i7 processors/Intel® CoreTM i5 processors/Intel® CoreTM i3 processors/Intel® Pentium® processors/Intel® Celeron® processors in the LGA1151 package.Smart Fan 5 features Multiple Temperature Sensors and Hybrid Fan Headers
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18 Comments
I am sure Amazon will price match anytime soon
Voted hot as cheapest price going for a Z270 motherboard.

Im new to building a pc and want to have a go. Am I not better off going for the Z370 motherboard as I can then put in the newest coffee lake processor? Or should I go for an AM4 socket motherboard and get the Ryzen 3 2200g? Thanks
Just remember the 2200g doesn't support windows 7 only 8.1 and up.
ws00713 m ago

Just remember the 2200g doesn't support windows 7 only 8.1 and up.


And that your mainboard might need an update first. I guess it depends if he is gaming or not and if he is if he needs/wants a light gaming system without a discrete card.
plewis006 m ago

And that your mainboard might need an update first. I guess it depends if …And that your mainboard might need an update first. I guess it depends if he is gaming or not and if he is if he needs/wants a light gaming system without a discrete card.



So my local computer store said they would update the mobo for me to accept the newer Ryzen. Ultimately I will be adding a GPU to my system...but my question is as the z270 mobo supports up to 7th gen intel, am i better off going for a newer mobo/processor for slightly more money?
peachybubba19803 m ago

So my local computer store said they would update the mobo for me to …So my local computer store said they would update the mobo for me to accept the newer Ryzen. Ultimately I will be adding a GPU to my system...but my question is as the z270 mobo supports up to 7th gen intel, am i better off going for a newer mobo/processor for slightly more money?


It depends what you’re doing with it. But yeah, 7th gen Intel is good value but at a massive performance disadvantage with less cores compared to the 8th gen. Personally I’d take 7th gen and the saving but that’s just me.

The upgrade to 8th gen is quite a lot more as the board and CPUs are both more expensive.
Decent deal if your old board needs replace. Bit pointless if you're looking to build a new system, though - there's not too much point buying into ye olde quad-core platforms in this era of 6 & 8-core chips.
dxx1 h, 0 m ago

Decent deal if your old board needs replace. Bit pointless if you're …Decent deal if your old board needs replace. Bit pointless if you're looking to build a new system, though - there's not too much point buying into ye olde quad-core platforms in this era of 6 & 8-core chips.


Well, not entirely, it depends on the usage pattern as quad-core is and has been fine since about 2009 and many things don't take advantage of more cores right now (especially games). Not to mention, as I said above, while 8th gen is undoubtedly faster, it's also a lot more expensive, a good £200+ at a guess - that's not insignificant.

While I use my computer a lot, £200 is a big saving that can be spent on an SSD (which would be way faster than a mechanical drive in an 8th gen system) or a half-decent GPU (if you can find one!) - like a 1050 Ti or RX series card.
plewis008 m ago

Well, not entirely, it depends on the usage pattern as quad-core is and …Well, not entirely, it depends on the usage pattern as quad-core is and has been fine since about 2009 and many things don't take advantage of more cores right now (especially games). Not to mention, as I said above, while 8th gen is undoubtedly faster, it's also a lot more expensive, a good £200+ at a guess - that's not insignificant.While I use my computer a lot, £200 is a big saving that can be spent on an SSD (which would be way faster than a mechanical drive in an 8th gen system) or a half-decent GPU (if you can find one!) - like a 1050 Ti or RX series card.


The key phrase you use there is 'right now'. Even ignoring all the software now which benefits from >4 cores, if you're building now, you're probably building a system that's going to last you for the next few years, and building a system for the past is something you'll regret when you're using it in the future.
dxx5 m ago

The key phrase you use there is 'right now'. Even ignoring all the …The key phrase you use there is 'right now'. Even ignoring all the software now which benefits from >4 cores, if you're building now, you're probably building a system that's going to last you for the next few years, and building a system for the past is something you'll regret when you're using it in the future.


I do not understand how you can possibly speak for everyone - people above are discussing the 'cheapest' parts. There is no denying that 8th gen is better but there is a heavy cost implication. That's like me saying anyone who buys a PC with no discrete graphics is an idiot. Why? Because some people don't need or want a GPU. You're also making an assumption that people want it to last years without ever having to upgrade. If I had to, right now I'd buy 7th gen, pocket the saving, wait for 8th to go mainstream and upgrade again then.

Let's not forget, this won't be obsolete, will it? As people (me included) are still using 3rd and 4th gen systems very happily. There is just no future-proofing in this day and age. Yes, I said 'right now' and if 'right now' someone doesn't have that extra £200 to spend, they will end up cutting corners elsewhere, maybe to their detriment. Best to ask people what they want and then give the advice. I was specifically replying to someone with my own opinion - that may be right or wrong.
plewis0039 m ago

I do not understand how you can possibly speak for everyone - people above …I do not understand how you can possibly speak for everyone - people above are discussing the 'cheapest' parts. There is no denying that 8th gen is better but there is a heavy cost implication. That's like me saying anyone who buys a PC with no discrete graphics is an idiot. Why? Because some people don't need or want a GPU. You're also making an assumption that people want it to last years without ever having to upgrade. If I had to, right now I'd buy 7th gen, pocket the saving, wait for 8th to go mainstream and upgrade again then.Let's not forget, this won't be obsolete, will it? As people (me included) are still using 3rd and 4th gen systems very happily. There is just no future-proofing in this day and age. Yes, I said 'right now' and if 'right now' someone doesn't have that extra £200 to spend, they will end up cutting corners elsewhere, maybe to their detriment. Best to ask people what they want and then give the advice. I was specifically replying to someone with my own opinion - that may be right or wrong.


Thank you both for your advice. It has been beneficial seeing 2 different points of view
plewis0040 m ago

I do not understand how you can possibly speak for everyone - people above …I do not understand how you can possibly speak for everyone - people above are discussing the 'cheapest' parts. There is no denying that 8th gen is better but there is a heavy cost implication. That's like me saying anyone who buys a PC with no discrete graphics is an idiot. Why? Because some people don't need or want a GPU. You're also making an assumption that people want it to last years without ever having to upgrade. If I had to, right now I'd buy 7th gen, pocket the saving, wait for 8th to go mainstream and upgrade again then.Let's not forget, this won't be obsolete, will it? As people (me included) are still using 3rd and 4th gen systems very happily. There is just no future-proofing in this day and age. Yes, I said 'right now' and if 'right now' someone doesn't have that extra £200 to spend, they will end up cutting corners elsewhere, maybe to their detriment. Best to ask people what they want and then give the advice. I was specifically replying to someone with my own opinion - that may be right or wrong.


The cost implication is trivial. I don't know where you're getting £200 from. It's £50 difference for the CPU and £30 for the mobo (cite: uk.pcpartpicker.com), which amounts to, what, a 10% difference over the full build cost of a PC?

You can save £80 on an obsolete setup if you like, but I think you'd be crazy to do so. Were you to buy this from what (I presume) is somewhere in the range of a 4600k, you'd gain maybe 5-10% IPC, and maybe the same again in clock frequency, Optimally, this might yield you a 20% performance boost, tops, at a cost of around £500, including the 16GB of DDR4 you'd need to buy. Spend another £80, and for 16% more money, you've got a potential performance boost of 75% instead.

I get that it's not always worthwhile buying the latest generation, but when there are such significant gains to be had for such trivial additional sums (and really, if you can't afford an extra £80, you probably shouldn't be looking to upgrade your PC yet), it seems foolish not to.
dxx49 m ago

The cost implication is trivial. I don't know where you're getting £200 …The cost implication is trivial. I don't know where you're getting £200 from. It's £50 difference for the CPU and £30 for the mobo (cite: uk.pcpartpicker.com), which amounts to, what, a 10% difference over the full build cost of a PC? You can save £80 on an obsolete setup if you like, but I think you'd be crazy to do so. Were you to buy this from what (I presume) is somewhere in the range of a 4600k, you'd gain maybe 5-10% IPC, and maybe the same again in clock frequency, Optimally, this might yield you a 20% performance boost, tops, at a cost of around £500, including the 16GB of DDR4 you'd need to buy. Spend another £80, and for 16% more money, you've got a potential performance boost of 75% instead. I get that it's not always worthwhile buying the latest generation, but when there are such significant gains to be had for such trivial additional sums (and really, if you can't afford an extra £80, you probably shouldn't be looking to upgrade your PC yet), it seems foolish not to.


I really don’t want to have an argument over this but you obviously don’t like what I’ve said. What parts are you suggesting in the 8th gen range then, the board and CPU specifically (eg brand and model)?

My point is that 8th gen is not mainstream so it has a price penalty and 7th gen is practically under fire-sale because of the changes so you can get some bargains.

Also, you picked me up when I said ‘right now’, you keep using this phrase ‘obsolete’ - plenty of people are still using Sandy Bridge and it’s still fine, doesn’t that say a lot?
for miners - worth noting this system has 6 PCIe slots, 1 M.2 slot. You can comfortably host 7 GPUs using their mining specific bios. you can even get pcie splitters and bump up this limit to 13, if not higher with the latest windows update.
peachybubba198013th Mar

So my local computer store said they would update the mobo for me to …So my local computer store said they would update the mobo for me to accept the newer Ryzen. Ultimately I will be adding a GPU to my system...but my question is as the z270 mobo supports up to 7th gen intel, am i better off going for a newer mobo/processor for slightly more money?


If I was in your shoes I'd wait a month and get one of the new chipsets for the new ryzen+, and then pop the 2200g in it, it will give you a lot more choices in the future.
plewis002 h, 36 m ago

I really don’t want to have an argument over this but you obviously don’t l …I really don’t want to have an argument over this but you obviously don’t like what I’ve said. What parts are you suggesting in the 8th gen range then, the board and CPU specifically (eg brand and model)?My point is that 8th gen is not mainstream so it has a price penalty and 7th gen is practically under fire-sale because of the changes so you can get some bargains.Also, you picked me up when I said ‘right now’, you keep using this phrase ‘obsolete’ - plenty of people are still using Sandy Bridge and it’s still fine, doesn’t that say a lot?



You're comparing the 7600/7700k versus the 8600/7700k when you should be looking at the i5 8400 or the i3 8350k versus these. The 8600k/8700k is in another league of performance.

When making that comparison, the value proposition is much better.
Nate14925 m ago

You're comparing the 7600/7700k versus the 8600/7700k when you should be …You're comparing the 7600/7700k versus the 8600/7700k when you should be looking at the i5 8400 or the i3 8350k versus these. The 8600k/8700k is in another league of performance.When making that comparison, the value proposition is much better.


That's why I asked what CPU and mainboard this poster is using as a comparison point. Yes, if you just want the latest platform then you can look at the i3 8th gen for similar performance to the i5 7th gen (both good quad-cores) but that wasn't the debate...
plewis0016 h, 19 m ago

That's why I asked what CPU and mainboard this poster is using as a …That's why I asked what CPU and mainboard this poster is using as a comparison point. Yes, if you just want the latest platform then you can look at the i3 8th gen for similar performance to the i5 7th gen (both good quad-cores) but that wasn't the debate...


I mean, it totally is. You can buy an Gigabyte Z370P D3 and a Intel - Core i5-8400 for 230.91.


Or you can buy this motherboard for 70 and a i5 7500 for about the same... It's really not a close comparison in terms of performance. You are saving 15 quid on the motherboard to then buy a worse value rated CPU.


You said the gen 7 was good value. I'm saying it's not good value. There isn't much evidence to show the gen 7 is good value, yet you say it is. So?
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