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Good PSU for any of you building new rigs - Corsair RM750x 80 PLUS Gold - £82.99 @ Amazon
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Good PSU for any of you building new rigs - Corsair RM750x 80 PLUS Gold - £82.99 @ Amazon

27
Posted 2nd Dec 2019

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Saw this when browsing for my new PC. Been tracking the price for a couple weeks and this is a good deal. The RMx version is better than the RM version as it has a better quality fan and 100% Japanese capacitors. Not saying the RM is bad but when they are the same price this is the obvious choice. 10 year guarantee on this model too I think.

  • 80 PLUS Gold Certified: High efficiency operation for lower power consumption, less noise and cooler temperatures.
  • Tuned for Low Noise Operation: A specially set fan curve ensures that, even at full load, fan noise is kept to a minimum.
  • Zero RPM Fan Mode: At low and medium loads the cooling fan switches off entirely for near-silent operation.
  • 100% All Japanese 105°C Capacitors: Premium internal components ensure unwavering power delivery and long-term reliability.
  • Fully Modular Cables: Only connect the cables your system needs, making clean and tidy builds easier.
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27 Comments
I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 Watts seems a bit overkill but there's not much of a prive difference between the lower watt models. Any advice?
Hot deal! I ordered the non x version a couple of days ago from overclockers uk for £99.95. I've just cancelled that and ordered this one.
OmegaSaad02/12/2019 11:27

I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 …I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 Watts seems a bit overkill but there's not much of a prive difference between the lower watt models. Any advice?


Nothing wrong with a bit of overhead. Means you can upgrade other components like cpu and gpu in the future without having to worry about needing to buy another psu
OmegaSaad02/12/2019 11:27

I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 …I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 Watts seems a bit overkill but there's not much of a prive difference between the lower watt models. Any advice?


Go higher. I've had power supplies for 10 year's, in multiple systems. Never had to shelve out again due PSU not making the grade.
Had a 650w versions of this psu, blew within 2 months (nothing broke besides the psu)
OmegaSaad02/12/2019 11:27

I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 …I'm building a new PC, my estimated wattage on pc part picker is 450. 750 Watts seems a bit overkill but there's not much of a prive difference between the lower watt models. Any advice?


There's no harm in going higher wattage other than upfront cost. I almost went for the 850w because it was only 7 quid more and my anticipated wattage is on par with yours. But 7 quid is 7 quid :P

What is does give you is future proofing and with a 10 year guarantee this can be used in your next PC in 5 years quite comfortably. (and that one might need 750w)
I have been using the same 750w gold psu since 2014, used it for 3 pc builds. Tempting lol
Josh_millen02/12/2019 11:42

I have been using the same 750w gold psu since 2014, used it for 3 pc …I have been using the same 750w gold psu since 2014, used it for 3 pc builds. Tempting lol


Had my Tagan PipeRock 800watt for 11 years now, still going strong. Never scrimp on your PSU.
LukeyWolf02/12/2019 11:36

Had a 650w versions of this psu, blew within 2 months (nothing broke …Had a 650w versions of this psu, blew within 2 months (nothing broke besides the psu)


Darn it. Just bought the 650w version for my lads new build, £80 from Box. Think the wattage required was about 450 so thought the 650 should do. Fingers crossed all is OK.
Wellbetr02/12/2019 11:40

There's no harm in going higher wattage other than upfront cost. I almost …There's no harm in going higher wattage other than upfront cost. I almost went for the 850w because it was only 7 quid more and my anticipated wattage is on par with yours. But 7 quid is 7 quid :PWhat is does give you is future proofing and with a 10 year guarantee this can be used in your next PC in 5 years quite comfortably. (and that one might need 750w)


Things are getting more and more energy efficient. Unless you plan on running dual gfx cards in the future I don’t think the argument about more power = future proofing holds much sway anymore.
FellowPazzini02/12/2019 11:48

Darn it. Just bought the 650w version for my lads new build, £80 from Box. …Darn it. Just bought the 650w version for my lads new build, £80 from Box. Think the wattage required was about 450 so thought the 650 should do. Fingers crossed all is OK.


Should be fine, they probably had fixed it by now but at the time I got the evga supernova g2 650w
39228914-zPrNm.jpg
This is why it is advisable to buy a PSU rated above what you need, using this one as an example the efficiency is highest at around 40-50% load (300-375w in this case) and the fans are running slower and therefor less noisy as opposed to being near 100% load.
Saying that, my build runs WAY below what online PSU calculators tell me it does, so if you are covered based on one of those sites, then believe me you are well covered.
Edited by: "sBech" 2nd Dec 2019
MarcYoung02/12/2019 11:32

Nothing wrong with a bit of overhead. Means you can upgrade other …Nothing wrong with a bit of overhead. Means you can upgrade other components like cpu and gpu in the future without having to worry about needing to buy another psu


+1 to this. Always good to have a bit of overhead as components age too.
Have Corsair had an RM only model for a while? It’s been RMx and RMi for a few years I think - the i has a better fan and digital monitoring.
plewis0002/12/2019 13:22

Have Corsair had an RM only model for a while? It’s been RMx and RMi for a …Have Corsair had an RM only model for a while? It’s been RMx and RMi for a few years I think - the i has a better fan and digital monitoring.


Yeah, I think the RM model has been around for awhile. It got a 2019 refresh though and it's sold as the cheaper line now. The RMx and RMi modelas are the premium ones with the main difference with the RMi being that you can plug into the PSU directly for software monitoring of power usage.
Excellent price - Corsair's 10 year warranty is brilliant. I had the older RM750 which started to develop serious coil whine after 6 years, so they replaced it with a brand new 750x...

...and allowed me to register it for another 10 year's warranty.
sBech02/12/2019 12:31

[Image] This is why it is advisable to buy a PSU rated above what you …[Image] This is why it is advisable to buy a PSU rated above what you need, using this one as an example the efficiency is highest at around 40-50% load (300-375w in this case) and the fans are running slower and therefor less noisy as opposed to being near 100% load.Saying that, my build runs WAY below what online PSU calculators tell me it does, so if you are covered based on one of those sites, then believe me you are well covered.


I'd be dubious of any chart which uses such a weirdly irregular scale. It's classic deceptive marketing intended to make it seem like it's best to buy a PSU with twice the required capacity - why else do you think the first 10% would occupy the same space as the last 50%?
The
Pájaro02/12/2019 14:46

I'd be dubious of any chart which uses such a weirdly irregular scale. …I'd be dubious of any chart which uses such a weirdly irregular scale. It's classic deceptive marketing intended to make it seem like it's best to buy a PSU with twice the required capacity - why else do you think the first 10% would occupy the same space as the last 50%?


The efficiency curves are supported by data - but you're talking 2-3%, so while a factor it shouldn't be a primary motivator.

The point being though - the 750w is currently cheaper than the 650w so I can't see any reason why you would choose to pay more for a lower wattage.
sBech02/12/2019 12:31

[Image] This is why it is advisable to buy a PSU rated above what you …[Image] This is why it is advisable to buy a PSU rated above what you need, using this one as an example the efficiency is highest at around 40-50% load (300-375w in this case) and the fans are running slower and therefor less noisy as opposed to being near 100% load.Saying that, my build runs WAY below what online PSU calculators tell me it does, so if you are covered based on one of those sites, then believe me you are well covered.


The downside is that efficiency drops off once you get below that 40-50% load mark, particularly towards the lower end, and you're probably not going to be running your entire system flat out all the time. (There's a reason that efficiency graph cuts off at the 10% load level...) Probably doesn't matter too much here but you don't want to be using a massively excessive power supply. Also, remember that even a 3% efficiency difference corresponds to one whole level on the 80 Plus certification scheme, which can cost quite a bit, and it's definitely possible to throw all that efficiency away by using too large a supply.
Wellbetr02/12/2019 14:54

The The efficiency curves are supported by data - but you're talking …The The efficiency curves are supported by data - but you're talking 2-3%, so while a factor it shouldn't be a primary motivator.The point being though - the 750w is currently cheaper than the 650w so I can't see any reason why you would choose to pay more for a lower wattage.


It’s always good to be efficient but also worth pointing out that you don’t run your PC at peak power 24/7 or even 10% of the time I guess. Totally agree that if you can get more wattage for less or the same then you should though.

I think people would be surprised at how little power PCs actually use - I have the RM550i in one of the gaming PCs and under full load, the current draw is 210W DC and about 226W at the wall, GPU is RX 480 and the CPU is an i5-4590S. We had a PC in the office with 2x Vega 56 in it and that didn’t break 430W.
Once you have powered fans (i like lots thermally controlled, i have H100i too), hds, cpu and gfx card I find this spec psu to be a good buy. (nice to have) You prob would get away with less but in my opinion it is not worth it.

Buy this.
I have a micro atx motherboard and case and this fits perfectly. The only problem is, because the fan hardly ever seems to run everything gets super hot. Even the case itself. Keep this in mind if you intend to install this in a small case with limited airflow.
Good I bought this last year £84

I originally ordered a 650w but realised its pointless, get a bit extra room for future proofing
MakoBytes02/12/2019 16:04

The downside is that efficiency drops off once you get below that 40-50% …The downside is that efficiency drops off once you get below that 40-50% load mark, particularly towards the lower end, and you're probably not going to be running your entire system flat out all the time. (There's a reason that efficiency graph cuts off at the 10% load level...) Probably doesn't matter too much here but you don't want to be using a massively excessive power supply. Also, remember that even a 3% efficiency difference corresponds to one whole level on the 80 Plus certification scheme, which can cost quite a bit, and it's definitely possible to throw all that efficiency away by using too large a supply.


Yes you are spot on, it does build up to that peak efficiency, but ideally you want the best efficiency when you are drawing the most power, which would probably be during gaming, not when browsing the web or idling, as although your efficiency is worse during those tasks, the draw is relatively small anyway.
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