Greenchem Adblue 10Ltr - £8.77 delivered with SALE16 @ Carparts4less (anything up to £15 elsewhere eg on the garage forecourt, and you're stuffed if the Adblue light comes on so best to get a reserve 10L in)
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Greenchem Adblue 10Ltr - £8.77 delivered with SALE16 @ Carparts4less (anything up to £15 elsewhere eg on the garage forecourt, and you're stuffed if the Adblue light comes on so best to get a reserve 10L in)

33
Found 24th FebEdited by:"luvsadealdealdeal"
SALE16 gets 16% off - pls tell me if there's a 20% code kicking around this weekend!

What's this stuff for? New Audis and VWs (diesels) won't run without it, it's an additive that gets mixed in to your emissions/ exhaust gases by the car when your car burns diesel (to make your car run cleaner). Used by certain other cars.

Yes it's a bit cheaper at a fuel station with an Abblue pump but we don't have one near us so I am reduced to adding it to my wife's car from this blimmin' 10L container once every few weeks.
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Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding of what this is.

It's a solution of urea in distilled water. Goes into its own tank on the vehicle. Vehicle's 'brain' determines how much to squirt into the exhaust system where it turns up to 80% of the nasty NOx into harmless nitrogen and water in order to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations. Certainly not limited to VW group stuff and trucks have been using it for some time. Consumption varies as said above. Pumps at fuel stations are usually for trucks and not suitable for cars as pressure is too high (read your handbook). My vehicle (LR Discovery Sport) takes 12litres which is unlikely to last between services.

The vehicle gives plenty of warnings that it's running low and, eventually, when empty it will refuse to start as it would then emit illegal emissions. If you get to that point you have only yourself to blame as you probably will have filled up with fuel 2 or 3 times since the first warning! If you do run to empty don't turn the engine off until you reach somewhere you can top up the adblue - will probably take at least 4 litres to turn the warning off.

These 10litre cans can be very awkward to use when full (fillers can be in various locationsL: under bonnet; next to fuel filler; even in the boot). One solution is to buy a (very expensive) 1.89litre can with a special attachment and valve on the top and keep refilling this.
Edited by: "Besford" 24th Feb
33 Comments
You shouldnt need to add it as often as that my book says a full tank of ad blue might only need topping up at
service intervals 18000 miles or 2 years.
Ive had my car for six months and never added any apparently it will show up on dash when its needed.
Of course it depends on the make and model I would ask local Dealer advice.
Average is 750 miles per litre but can vary depending on driving situation
so top ups depend on size of the tank i guess
Edited by: "bluewolf87868" 24th Feb
bluewolf878683 m ago

You shouldnt need to add it as often as that my book says a full tank of …You shouldnt need to add it as often as that my book says a full tank of ad blue might only need topping up atservice intervals 18000 miles or 2 years.Ive had my car for six months and never added any apparently it will show up on dash when its needed.Of course it depends on the make and model I would ask local Dealer advice.


My wife's work car was replaced @ 3 yrs in November - she had the same model before an A4 estate. The old one needed 10L Adblue about every 6-8 weeks (fairly low mileage) - the newer one doesn't seem to be as thirsty so looks like you are right for certain newer models.

A lot will depend on your mileage of course.
My Audi TDi Ultra is coming up for its first service. Not needed any Adblue adding yet. 13k miles on clock.
Just googled they say minimum would be 350miles per litre
Jag diesels use it too
All euro 6 diesels use it.
I have a Peugeot 5008 blue hdi and only need it refilled at first years service , only did 2500 miles.
But Peugeot offer a 10 litre refill while you wait fro £9.99.
peugeot.co.uk/adb…ue/

What's this stuff for? New Audis and VWs (diesels) won't run without it, it's an additive that gets mixed in by the car when your car burns diesel (to make your car run cleaner). Useless for other cars.

On Peugeots its squirted into the exhaust not mixed in fuel.
Edited by: "bigwheels" 25th Feb
Filled up the new works van yesterday.2500 miles driven,10 Litres took it back to the full mark.
Edited by: "duke" 24th Feb
why still make diesel if there is all this trouble ?
It’s a right faff. We’ve got a Skoda yeti and SEAT Alhambra at work that both use the stuff. If you don’t fill it back up in time(lots of warnings on dash), they won’t start.
Managed to test and confirm that too; followed by even more faff getting them going again afterwards.
Is it cheaper at the pump then? I know that a shell garage in a town about half an hour away has a pump but assumed it would be no different or even dearer buying it that way rather than buying these tubs.

The van has just hit 4000 miles and I have put 10 litres in because the bloody thing said it needed urgently refilling even though the needle said the tank was half full. I filled it in case the needle was wrong and it went back to full so I don’t know what it was playing at
Perhaps someone with either a modern diesel car or knowledge of these things can answer this for me as there is very little information about this on the internet and your typical motoring journalist keeps on bleating on about the mundane stuff because the technical stuff is too taking on their brains. My question, do diesel cars that conform to Euro 6 emission standards only use ad blue or they also have a DPF fitted too. DPF was fitted to diesel cars complying with Euro 5 emission standards and proved to be very troublesome.
Edited by: "buylowsellhigh" 24th Feb
Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding of what this is.

It's a solution of urea in distilled water. Goes into its own tank on the vehicle. Vehicle's 'brain' determines how much to squirt into the exhaust system where it turns up to 80% of the nasty NOx into harmless nitrogen and water in order to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations. Certainly not limited to VW group stuff and trucks have been using it for some time. Consumption varies as said above. Pumps at fuel stations are usually for trucks and not suitable for cars as pressure is too high (read your handbook). My vehicle (LR Discovery Sport) takes 12litres which is unlikely to last between services.

The vehicle gives plenty of warnings that it's running low and, eventually, when empty it will refuse to start as it would then emit illegal emissions. If you get to that point you have only yourself to blame as you probably will have filled up with fuel 2 or 3 times since the first warning! If you do run to empty don't turn the engine off until you reach somewhere you can top up the adblue - will probably take at least 4 litres to turn the warning off.

These 10litre cans can be very awkward to use when full (fillers can be in various locationsL: under bonnet; next to fuel filler; even in the boot). One solution is to buy a (very expensive) 1.89litre can with a special attachment and valve on the top and keep refilling this.
Edited by: "Besford" 24th Feb
buylowsellhigh18 m ago

Perhaps someone with either a modern diesel car or knowledge of these …Perhaps someone with either a modern diesel car or knowledge of these things can answer this for me as there is very little information about this on the internet and your typical motoring journalist keeps on bleating on about the mundane stuff because the technical stuff is too taking on their brains. My question, do diesel cars that conform to Euro 6 emission standards only use ad blue or they also have a DPF fitted too. DPF was fitted to diesel cars complying with Euro 5 emission standards and proved to be very troublesome.


They also have a DPF - that catches the sooty stuff, not gasses. Yes, they can be an expensive nuisance if you only do short journeys as they need longer, high speed runs on a regular basis to burn off the soot. If your car is only for local running around and mainly short journeys then a modern diesel really isn't for you.

Just changed wife's 11 year old diesel Fiesta for a new one and went petrol for that reason (and linked concern re. residuals on diesels). However, she now gets 35mpg from a 999cc petrol whereas the previous 1500cc diesel did 55+mpg with the same use. Tax has gone up from £30 to £140 too!
Edited by: "Besford" 24th Feb
Besford23 m ago

Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding …Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding of what this is.It's a solution of urea in distilled water. Goes into its own tank on the vehicle. Vehicle's 'brain' determines how much to squirt into the exhaust system where it turns up to 80% of the nasty NOx into harmless nitrogen and water in order to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations. Certainly not limited to VW group stuff and trucks have been using it for some time. Consumption varies as said above. Pumps at fuel stations are usually for trucks and not suitable for cars as pressure is too high (read your handbook). My vehicle (LR Discovery Sport) takes 12litres which is unlikely to last between services.The vehicle gives plenty of warnings that it's running low and, eventually, when empty it will refuse to start as it would then emit illegal emissions. If you get to that point you have only yourself to blame as you probably will have filled up with fuel 2 or 3 times since the first warning! If you do run to empty don't turn the engine off until you reach somewhere you can top up the adblue - will probably take at least 4 litres to turn the warning off.These 10litre cans can be very awkward to use when full (fillers can be in various locationsL: under bonnet; next to fuel filler; even in the boot). One solution is to buy a (very expensive) 1.89litre can with a special attachment and valve on the top and keep refilling this.



Good post. At about 15,000 miles our BMW X6 needed eight 2L bottles to fill the Adblue tank, cost about £55 from the BMW dealer, ouch!, and a lot of wasted plastic bottles. I placed a special order at the dealer's service desk for two 10L plastic containers and now use one of the 2L plastic bottles to keep the tank topped up. Works out at about half the cost.
Edited by: "Johnnyboy" 24th Feb
Thanks for the reply Besford, I have changed over to petrol for the same reason and due to very good MPG on diesels wondered if they had sorted the dreaded DPF issues out but apparently not.
buylowsellhigh1 h, 53 m ago

Thanks for the reply Besford, I have changed over to petrol for the same …Thanks for the reply Besford, I have changed over to petrol for the same reason and due to very good MPG on diesels wondered if they had sorted the dreaded DPF issues out but apparently not.


I'm not sure if 'issues' is quite the right term. They do what they're supposed to do but still people don't understand (I guess it's not in a dealer's interests to dissuade some people from buying - but they should). My neighbour does 1.5 miles each way to work and little else but I could not dissuade him from treating himself to the diesel Audi A7 he coveted: he has a big bill coming!
Edited by: "Besford" 24th Feb
Johnnyboy13 m ago

Good post. At about 15,000 miles our BMW X6 needed eight 2L bottles to …Good post. At about 15,000 miles our BMW X6 needed eight 2L bottles to fill the Adblue tank, cost about £55 from the BMW dealer, ouch!, and a lot of wasted plastic bottles. I placed a special order at the dealer's service desk for two 10L plastic containers and now use one of the 2L plastic bottles to keep the tank topped up. Works out at about half the cost.


Those small bottles are worth more than the contents! Very handy though.

You really don't need to get it from BMW - it's all the same stuff and even cheaper this way.
Voted hot but I have a cheaper way if you local petrol station stock it buy one save container and refill next time that you need it petrol stations average 45-50p a litre so nearly half price!
Just buy a diesel which don't use this stuff. Not all Euro 6 diesels use it. Honda don't.
Besford5 h, 56 m ago

I'm not sure if 'issues' is quite the right term. They do what they're …I'm not sure if 'issues' is quite the right term. They do what they're supposed to do but still people don't understand (I guess it's not in a dealer's interests to dissuade some people from buying - but they should). My neighbour does 1.5 miles each way to work and little else but I could not dissuade him from treating himself to the diesel Audi A7 he coveted: he has a big bill coming!


I had a diesel as I normally would do about 200 plus miles a week but car went into limp mode without warning and had a lot of problems trying to rectify it.
My experience for what its worth is that exhaust gasses need to get really hot for the DPF and most short journeys will not allow the engine to get hot enough to burn soot off.
Some diesel also use another additive called Pat Fluid Eolys which lowers the combustion temperature of soot in the DPF so it burns off. For the system to work effectively you need to do 30-50 mile of motorway driving at least a week otherwise it will get blocked.
Sometimes it can be regenerated at a garage but the regeneration process involves revving the engine and overloading it with fuel which can wreck the engine especially if unburnt fuel gets into the oil.
My car was Euro 5 compliant so just the DPF to get rid of the soot and EGR for NOx but with Euro 6 Adblue is also required in some cars along with EGR to get rid of the oxides of Nitrogen. I am not sure why it is so expensive as urea is cheap enough substance commonly found in the urine of mammals
The DPF and EGR valve are the most common problems with diesel cars and as the emission standards get stricter the exhaust gas cleaning technology will get more and more difficult to maintain even though the engine will be trouble free.
Edited by: "buylowsellhigh" 24th Feb
bigwheels8 h, 17 m ago

All euro 6 diesels use it.I have a Peugeot 5005 blue hdi and only need it …All euro 6 diesels use it.I have a Peugeot 5005 blue hdi and only need it refilled at first years service , only did 2500 miles.But Peugeot offer a 10 litre refill while you wait fro £9.99.http://www.peugeot.co.uk/adblue/What's this stuff for? New Audis and VWs (diesels) won't run without it, it's an additive that gets mixed in by the car when your car burns diesel (to make your car run cleaner). Useless for other cars.On Peugeots its squirted into the exhaust not mixed in fuel.


Yes, It squirts it into the catalyst/DPF as they're combined in newish cars with adblue system. It converts NOx into less harmful emissions apparently.

I've had my Zafira Tourer 1.6 Ecoflex 8 months, 10K miles and not needed to add any yet. I do a mixture of driving. I guess it varies.
skiddlydiddly5 h, 38 m ago

It’s a right faff. We’ve got a Skoda yeti and SEAT Alhambra at work that bo …It’s a right faff. We’ve got a Skoda yeti and SEAT Alhambra at work that both use the stuff. If you don’t fill it back up in time(lots of warnings on dash), they won’t start. Managed to test and confirm that too; followed by even more faff getting them going again afterwards.


If you top it up when it first gives you a warning you'll have no problem, They give you so many thousand miles to top it up, If you ignore it and it runs out your car will run in limp mode for 4 restarts, After that your car wont start until it's been topped up.

Part of the EU's Euro 6 emission regulations. My tax is only £20 for the year and my NOx levels are supposedly reduced so well worth it. My previous Diesel was about £250 a year tax!.
buylowsellhigh5 h, 29 m ago

Perhaps someone with either a modern diesel car or knowledge of these …Perhaps someone with either a modern diesel car or knowledge of these things can answer this for me as there is very little information about this on the internet and your typical motoring journalist keeps on bleating on about the mundane stuff because the technical stuff is too taking on their brains. My question, do diesel cars that conform to Euro 6 emission standards only use ad blue or they also have a DPF fitted too. DPF was fitted to diesel cars complying with Euro 5 emission standards and proved to be very troublesome.


It's combined, Catalyst/DPF. On mine during the regeneration it squirts diesel into the DPF. A right pain but better than the older systems, At least you only have to replace one if it becomes faulty!. On separate older systems both could be damaged by the soot etc ;).
buylowsellhigh5 h, 11 m ago

Thanks for the reply Besford, I have changed over to petrol for the same …Thanks for the reply Besford, I have changed over to petrol for the same reason and due to very good MPG on diesels wondered if they had sorted the dreaded DPF issues out but apparently not.


Mazda (Skyactive X) are due to bring out a HCCI engine in 2019. High compression benefits of a diesel with the clean benefits of petrol. Engineering Explained did a great YouTube on how it works.
I've had the DPF warning a couple of times but I just drive a few miles in a lower gear and that clears it. I think my Zafira has needed an adBlue refill every 12000 miles. It gives plenty of warning time though so not a problem.
.MUFC.30 m ago

It's combined, Catalyst/DPF. On mine during the regeneration it squirts …It's combined, Catalyst/DPF. On mine during the regeneration it squirts diesel into the DPF. A right pain but better than the older systems, At least you only have to replace one if it becomes faulty!. On separate older systems both could be damaged by the soot etc ;).


It squirts diesel into the DPF? Liquid and soot will just produce a big black mess that will surely block the DPF?
Normally it's cleared by over fueling and adjusting the timing to produce increased combustion to super heat (burn off) and blow out the soot.
GAVINLEWISHUKD32 m ago

It squirts diesel into the DPF? Liquid and soot will just produce a big …It squirts diesel into the DPF? Liquid and soot will just produce a big black mess that will surely block the DPF?Normally it's cleared by over fueling and adjusting the timing to produce increased combustion to super heat (burn off) and blow out the soot.


Sorry it squirts extra diesel into the cylinders when the exhaust ports are open which helps increase the exhaust gas temperature, My bad ;). You are correct.
Edited by: ".MUFC." 24th Feb
.MUFC.2 h, 44 m ago

If you top it up when it first gives you a warning you'll have no problem, …If you top it up when it first gives you a warning you'll have no problem, They give you so many thousand miles to top it up, If you ignore it and it runs out your car will run in limp mode for 4 restarts, After that your car wont start until it's been topped up.Part of the EU's Euro 6 emission regulations. My tax is only £20 for the year and my NOx levels are supposedly reduced so well worth it. My previous Diesel was about £250 a year tax!.




Yeah. Wanted to see if the dealer was telling the truth. They were.
Besford17 h, 2 m ago

Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding …Excellent price but OP and others don't seem to have a real understanding of what this is.It's a solution of urea in distilled water. Goes into its own tank on the vehicle. Vehicle's 'brain' determines how much to squirt into the exhaust system where it turns up to 80% of the nasty NOx into harmless nitrogen and water in order to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations. Certainly not limited to VW group stuff and trucks have been using it for some time. Consumption varies as said above. Pumps at fuel stations are usually for trucks and not suitable for cars as pressure is too high (read your handbook). My vehicle (LR Discovery Sport) takes 12litres which is unlikely to last between services.The vehicle gives plenty of warnings that it's running low and, eventually, when empty it will refuse to start as it would then emit illegal emissions. If you get to that point you have only yourself to blame as you probably will have filled up with fuel 2 or 3 times since the first warning! If you do run to empty don't turn the engine off until you reach somewhere you can top up the adblue - will probably take at least 4 litres to turn the warning off.These 10litre cans can be very awkward to use when full (fillers can be in various locationsL: under bonnet; next to fuel filler; even in the boot). One solution is to buy a (very expensive) 1.89litre can with a special attachment and valve on the top and keep refilling this.


Urea in water...so basically 10L of piss
Any Shell garages sell it for £0.69 from pump,
Esso garages for £0.70 per litre.
Pump pressure is to high that’s why it’s best to pump it into 10l container petrol station will have an attachment that goes on the end of the pump to being pressure down you can’t beat 45p to 50p a litre
45.9 at my local Shell
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