Guild reciprocating saw just £39.99 (was £59.99, 1/3 off) at Argos
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Guild reciprocating saw just £39.99 (was £59.99, 1/3 off) at Argos

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Found 8th Mar
I've got several Guild branded tools (Argos' own brand, previously Homebase too) and I have to say they've performed well and offered excellent value. This looks like a good tool at a terrific price and there seems to be plenty of stock out there too! Reviews are excellent and it has a 2 year guarantee.

I've got a similar saw, albeit from a different budget brand, and it's been incredibly useful - I've even cut out some big tree roots with it when I couldn't see another way to do the job!
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Agree, I have both mains and cordless Guilds power tools, they are well made, sturdy and above all fairly priced.

Great for the ardent DiY man and part time professional.
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deleted801301
I'm on the fence on this. You might not find anything better for the money, but for me you'd be better spending an extra £30 and getting the Makita M4501 (the jump in quality, performance and the extra year's warranty are worth far more than the £30 price difference):

screwfix.com/p/m…52r
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

I'm on the fence on this. You might not find anything better for the …I'm on the fence on this. You might not find anything better for the money, but for me you'd be better spending an extra £30 and getting the Makita M4501 (the jump in quality, performance and the extra year's warranty are worth far more than the £30 price difference):https://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-m4501-1010w-reciprocating-saw-240v/9852r


Little doubt it will be a better tool (though Makita isn't always as good as the 'brand' implies) - but £30 more is 75% more!
melted39 m ago

If you can live without variable speed, B&Q have one for £25:- …If you can live without variable speed, B&Q have one for £25:- https://www.diy.com/departments/mac-allister-750w-reciprocating-saw-ttb533rsp/1808009_BQ.prdCould have done with a rubberised grip around the neck, but otherwise ok.


Are you sure it isn't variable? If so I'd say it's difficult to use or even dangerous in some situations.
Besford34 m ago

Are you sure it isn't variable? If so I'd say it's difficult to use or …Are you sure it isn't variable? If so I'd say it's difficult to use or even dangerous in some situations.


I'm sure. Not found the lack of soft start and variable speed to be an issue for me, the lack of a cushioned rubber grip on a vibrating tool is somewhat.

I bought one to cut down ivy, tree trunks and branches that were growing through a wooden fence I was tearing down. Some had wire embedded in them and there was wire mesh attached to the fence, so using the chainsaw was out.

I managed to pick up a couple of packs of discounted, quality brand, long blades in Screwfiix (B&Q's were overpriced), but I still spent more money on the blades than I did on the saw.
Edited by: "melted" 8th Mar
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deleted801301
Besford46 m ago

Little doubt it will be a better tool (though Makita isn't always as good …Little doubt it will be a better tool (though Makita isn't always as good as the 'brand' implies) - but £30 more is 75% more!


True, but of course citing percentages is relative. Most people wouldn't think twice about spending £10 on a product if it is significantly better than the £5 alternative, despite it being 100% more expensive. But someone looking for a £250k house is unlikely to be in the market for one at 50% more. Then of course you can argue that if the Guild breaks after 2 years 6 months and you have to buy another (and assuming it's available at the offer price then), it's then cost you 14% more than the Makita would have.

If your max budget is £40 then it's a fair buy, but if you've got the extra £30 available to spend then the Guild becomes false economy (and certainly not worth it's RRP).
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

True, but of course citing percentages is relative. Most people wouldn't …True, but of course citing percentages is relative. Most people wouldn't think twice about spending £10 on a product if it is significantly better than the £5 alternative, despite it being 100% more expensive. But someone looking for a £250k house is unlikely to be in the market for one at 50% more. Then of course you can argue that if the Guild breaks after 2 years 6 months and you have to buy another (and assuming it's available at the offer price then), it's then cost you 14% more than the Makita would have.If your max budget is £40 then it's a fair buy, but if you've got the extra £30 available to spend then the Guild becomes false economy (and certainly not worth it's RRP).


I don't necessarily disagree with you but I think there's a different perspective. If Guild stuff was poor I'd agree but that certainly hasn't been my experience. No doubt the Makita is a superior product but I wonder how much of that 70 quid is paying for the name? Yes, at RRP this one would not be a good buy.
Edited by: "Besford" 8th Mar
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deleted801301
Besford14 m ago

I don't necessarily disagree with you but I think there's a different …I don't necessarily disagree with you but I think there's a different perspective. If Guild stuff was poor I'd agree but that certainly hasn't been my experience. No doubt the Makita is a superior product but I wonder how much of that 70 quid paying for the name? Yes, at RRP this one would not be a good buy.


In my experience (based on the tools, not the accessories which are generally junk) they're very solid for the money. I've got a real mixture of power tools, and have no particular bias towards Makita.
The MT line (the orange ones) are actually really good value- people often cite them as Makita's DIY line, which isn't true really; it's "last year's tech" if you like- mainline tools that have been superceded, so rather than ditching them they rebrand them and put them out cheaper. There may be a few costs savings thrown into the mix as well I daresay, but they still market them (and guarantee them accordingly) for trade use.
And of course with Makita there's generally no spare part you can't readily get, so factoring that in as well I would say the price difference definitely reflects the real-term advantages, rather then just paying for the name
I mean if the Makita was £100 I probably wouldn't have suggested it as a possible alternative, but like I say if spending the extra £30 is an option, then it's really worth considering. It's actually surprising how often you end up using a reciprocating saw once you've got one, even if you've never thought you'd have use for one in the past.
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

In my experience (based on the tools, not the accessories which are …In my experience (based on the tools, not the accessories which are generally junk) they're very solid for the money. I've got a real mixture of power tools, and have no particular bias towards Makita.The MT line (the orange ones) are actually really good value- people often cite them as Makita's DIY line, which isn't true really; it's "last year's tech" if you like- mainline tools that have been superceded, so rather than ditching them they rebrand them and put them out cheaper. There may be a few costs savings thrown into the mix as well I daresay, but they still market them (and guarantee them accordingly) for trade use. And of course with Makita there's generally no spare part you can't readily get, so factoring that in as well I would say the price difference definitely reflects the real-term advantages, rather then just paying for the name I mean if the Makita was £100 I probably wouldn't have suggested it as a possible alternative option, but like I say if spending the extra £30 is an option, then it's really worth considering. It's actually surprising how often you end up using a reciprocating saw once you've got one, even if you've never thought you'd have use for one in the past.


I'm sure the Makita will be the better choice for some people (regular users probably) - others not wanting to spend that much or possibly just getting it with one job in mind will go for the Guild (with the confidence of knowing that they seem to give good service). Mine's a cheap Titan branded one from Screwfix and I've been very impressed with what that will do. They all seem to get through blades pretty quickly if you work them hard though.

I'm sold on cordless stuff these days and looking out for a cordless reciprocating saw which uses the battery systems I have (Ryobi or WORX/Guild) but they're still too much money at this point.

I had one of those B&D Scorpion things until it fell apart under light use (not unusual I understand from reviews)) - the blades are unique too and are very expensive.
Bought one of these a year ago, it's very powerful, well built and comes with a moulded case. I paid around the same price and would recommend for a DIY user.

Screwfix do an excellent variety pack of blades which was the perfect complement, used it around the garden and for plenty of DIY jobs.

Bought over a more expensive, less powerful, model from Erbauer from Screwfix.
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deleted801301
Besford12 m ago

I'm sure the Makita will be the better choice for some people (regular …I'm sure the Makita will be the better choice for some people (regular users probably) - others not wanting to spend that much or possibly just getting it with one job in mind will go for the Guild (with the confidence of knowing that they seem to give good service). Mine's a cheap Titan branded one from Screwfix and I've been very impressed with what that will do. They all seem to get through blades pretty quickly if you work them hard though.I'm sold on cordless stuff these days and looking out for a cordless reciprocating saw which uses the battery systems I have (Ryobi or WORX/Guild) but they're still too much money at this point.I had one of those B&D Scorpion things until it fell apart under light use (not unusual I understand from reviews)) - the blades are unique too and are very expensive.


Honestly I'm not disagreeing with you, just saying if £40 is your max, go for this. If you're able to go higher, look at the Makita as the price difference is worth it.

And yes cordless is a big benefit, especially on something like this that will get used outside a lot. Mine's cordless and I've used it places I just couldn't have got with a corded (without buying a generator). The Ryobi one is about £65 on Amazon at the minute (body only), which seems very reasonable. Again Worx have priced themselves too close to the pro brands for my liking, though I guess you're kind of committed to their system now.

Regarding the blades, try and let the saw do the work, and don't push down too hard on what you're cutting, that'll just generate excess heat that wrecks the blades.
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

Honestly I'm not disagreeing with you, just saying if £40 is your max, go …Honestly I'm not disagreeing with you, just saying if £40 is your max, go for this. If you're able to go higher, look at the Makita as the price difference is worth it.And yes cordless is a big benefit, especially on something like this that will get used outside a lot. Mine's cordless and I've used it places I just couldn't have got with a corded (without buying a generator). The Ryobi one is about £65 on Amazon at the minute (body only), which seems very reasonable. Again Worx have priced themselves too close to the pro brands for my liking, though I guess you're kind of committed to their system now.Regarding the blades, try and let the saw do the work, and don't push down too hard on what you're cutting, that'll just generate excess heat that wrecks the blades.


I think we're in complete agreement (I'm just tighter than you ). What a shame UK - EU can't agree so quickly!

I wouldn't pay WORX RRP but I've got several items in clearances with big discounts and the tools themselves are excellent. Batteries are interchangeable with Guild (and others) too* - I suspect they come out of the same factory in China. Ryobi are also good but I think they are too expensive these days (especially the batteries) and I probably wouldn't replace them with Ryobi if/when they finally give up; much cheaper in the US though where they are very popular - worth a look if you're over there.

I recently finished a whole house refurb for my son using Ryobi and Guild tools and I tended to reach for the Guild first - drivers and drills especially were lighter and seemed better balanced and kept going through some serious use. The only failure I had was a mains Lidl SDS drill which just wasn't up to the job and gave up after a few minutes with a chisel on a hard floor.

*hotukdeals.com/dea…436
Edited by: "Besford" 8th Mar
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deleted801301
Besford16 m ago

I think we're in complete agreement (I'm just tighter than you ). …I think we're in complete agreement (I'm just tighter than you ). What a shame UK - EU can't agree so quickly! I wouldn't pay WORX RRP but I've got several items in clearances with big discounts and the tools themselves are excellent. Batteries are interchangeable with Guild (and others) too* - I suspect they come out of the same factory in China. Ryobi are also good but I think they are too expensive these days (especially the batteries) and I probably wouldn't replace them with Ryobi if/when they finally give up; much cheaper in the US though where they are very popular - worth a look if you're over there.*https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/yet-another-reduction-15ah-18v-lithium-ion-battery-for-guild-worx-erbauer-titan-rockwell-jcb-wickes-etc-reduced-yet-again-to-1199-reduced-from-1999-and-cheapest-seen-at-argos-2899436


You're not wrong. I had a load of Worx/Erbauer stuff a few years ago- (Positec is the actual manufacturer if you're interested/didn't already know; I also wondered whether they make the Guild stuff, but haven't found a definitive answer so far.
It was actually pretty decent gear for the money, but I was put off by the absolute inability to make contact with them, and that worried me in case I ever had a warranty issue, so I sold them all on (it might be of interest that I was a bit clever with how I sold them, and not only managed to sell them for more than I paid for them, I also made enough to replace them all like-for-like with Milwaukee- though to be fair at the point I sold them most were unused so could be sold as new).

I don't think it's a case of you being tighter than me though. I would say I learned the hard way, if anything. To be fair for the use I give them I should have bought into the pro market from the off, but I thought I'd save a few quid and in the long run it cost me more, but as I say mine do get some hammer.

I've mixed opinions on Ryobi; the worst jigsaw I've ever used was a Ryobi. It was so bad I didn't even have the nerve to try and sell it, I just gave it away and even then apologised to the recipient. But the current crop seems to get good write-up's, and the forward/backward battery compatibility is a huge point in their favour, and probably shouldn't be overlooked when factoring in the value for money and longevity aspects.
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

You're not wrong. I had a load of Worx/Erbauer stuff a few years ago- …You're not wrong. I had a load of Worx/Erbauer stuff a few years ago- (Positec is the actual manufacturer if you're interested/didn't already know; I also wondered whether they make the Guild stuff, but haven't found a definitive answer so far. It was actually pretty decent gear for the money, but I was put off by the absolute inability to make contact with them, and that worried me in case I ever had a warranty issue, so I sold them all on (it might be of interest that I was a bit clever with how I sold them, and not only managed to sell them for more than I paid for them, I also made enough to replace them all like-for-like with Milwaukee- though to be fair at the point I sold them most were unused so could be sold as new).I don't think it's a case of you being tighter than me though. I would say I learned the hard way, if anything. To be fair for the use I give them I should have bought into the pro market from the off, but I thought I'd save a few quid and in the long run it cost me more, but as I say mine do get some hammer. I've mixed opinions on Ryobi; the worst jigsaw I've ever used was a Ryobi. It was so bad I didn't even have the nerve to try and sell it, I just gave it away and even then apologised to the recipient. But the current crop seems to get good write-up's, and the forward/backward battery compatibility is a huge point in their favour, and probably shouldn't be overlooked when factoring in the value for money and longevity aspects.


I just bought a WORX 'professional' brushless drill from Positec via eBay. I had a query after purchase and they couldn't have been more helpful - instant response to messages and a very generous offer to resolve my issue. I can't say they'd do the same with warranty but I'd have confidence based on my experience.
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deleted801301
Besford33 m ago

I just bought a WORX 'professional' brushless drill from Positec via eBay. …I just bought a WORX 'professional' brushless drill from Positec via eBay. I had a query after purchase and they couldn't have been more helpful - instant response to messages and a very generous offer to resolve my issue. I can't say they'd do the same with warranty but I'd have confidence based on my experience.


Strange- maybe they're more pro-active on ebay for fear of falling foul of them. I had a Worx product enquiry and emailed them (twice), tried phoning them, emailed Positec direct, messaged them on Facebook, even asked the question several times on their Facebook page, and got absolutely nothing back from them. Silly really, not bothering to reply once cost them me as a customer and maybe many others who were put off by my experience.

Ooh, speaking of paying a bit more though, your SDS there is a good example. Mine's a DeWalt, which I believe I paid £80 for 12 years ago, so not crazy money. It works as good as the day I bought it, and it's had some real use and abuse in that time. That's the only power tool I've still got that was bought around that period, as all the other (DIY) ones failed long ago. That's why I struggle now to advocate going for budget tools, if the gap between budget and pro isn't insurmountable; of course I understand that in some cases it's not an option, but if it ever is, don't even think about it, just go for the best you can afford.
Edited by: "deleted801301" 8th Mar
deleted8013018th Mar

Strange- maybe they're more pro-active on ebay for fear of falling foul of …Strange- maybe they're more pro-active on ebay for fear of falling foul of them. I had a Worx product enquiry and emailed them (twice), tried phoning them, emailed Positec direct, messaged them on Facebook, even asked the question several times on their Facebook page, and got absolutely nothing back from them. Silly really, not bothering to reply once cost them me as a customer and maybe many others who were put off by my experience.Ooh, speaking of paying a bit more though, your SDS there is a good example. Mine's a DeWalt, which I believe I paid £80 for 12 years ago. It works as good as the day I bought it, and it's had some real abuse in that time (honestly, when I was younger I maybe didn't look after my tools as well as I should, so I'd drill a hole then drop it on the floor ). That's the only power tool I've still got that was bought around that period, as all the other (DIY) ones failed long ago. That's why I struggle now to advocate going for budget tools, if the gap between budget and pro isn't insurmountable; of course I understand that in some cases it's not an option, but if it ever is, don't even think about it, just go for the best you can afford.


I did wonder if Positec has a new organisation - their addresses seem to have changed recently?
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deleted801301
Besford4 m ago

I did wonder if Positec has a new organisation - their addresses seem to …I did wonder if Positec has a new organisation - their addresses seem to have changed recently?


No idea to be honest, I've not really paid much attention to them since I got rid of all mine.
Besford2 h, 48 m ago

Mine's a cheap Titan branded one from Screwfix and I've been very …Mine's a cheap Titan branded one from Screwfix and I've been very impressed with what that will do.


It's not this one is it:- screwfix.com/p/t…639 ?


(exact same model as the £25 B&Q MAC Allistar one)
Great. I have been looking for a saw that gives something back.
I got a Titan one for £30 from Screwfix a while back. It's had heavy use cutting through radiators, doors, pipes, logs etc. Hasn't missed a beat.

No way I would spend £70 on a reciprocating saw.
Could I ask those in the know a couple of questions?
Will this cut through chunks of firewood (simply cutting them so they fit in my wood burner & trying to avoid the expense of a chainsaw + protective gear)?
And would the Screwfix Erbauer replacement blades fit on the B&Q saw mentioned above?
ethansdad1 h, 52 m ago

Could I ask those in the know a couple of questions?Will this cut through …Could I ask those in the know a couple of questions?Will this cut through chunks of firewood (simply cutting them so they fit in my wood burner & trying to avoid the expense of a chainsaw + protective gear)?And would the Screwfix Erbauer replacement blades fit on the B&Q saw mentioned above?


It will but it's not the most efficient way of cutting firewood. If you're going to do any quantity get a chainsaw. Can't comment on blade fixings but to my knowledge they're mostly the same fit.
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deleted801301
edgeone3 h, 52 m ago

No way I would spend £70 on a reciprocating saw.


You definitely won't be in the market for this one then- £555 (and I'm not sure if that even includes VAT)!

33403844-TE65u.jpg
ethansdad2 h, 43 m ago

Could I ask those in the know a couple of questions?Will this cut through …Could I ask those in the know a couple of questions?Will this cut through chunks of firewood (simply cutting them so they fit in my wood burner & trying to avoid the expense of a chainsaw + protective gear)?And would the Screwfix Erbauer replacement blades fit on the B&Q saw mentioned above?



They take standard reciprocating saw (sabre saw) blades. The screwfix erbauer blades are the correct fitting, but I'm sceptical about their quality, the teeth on the coarse ones don't look deep enough for the amount of dust produced, and they don't claim to be bi-metal as I recall, I bought these 240mm Dewalt ones for branches without wire in them:- screwfix.com/p/d…25v


33404173-uS68X.jpg


Reciprocating saws are much slower cutting than a chainsaw, and you need to tilt back and forth as you cut to clear the dust.


Here's a youtube video of someone using one on a log:-






If you are considering a chainsaw, I prefer an electric chainsaw to a petrol one as it is lighter, and stops the blade rapidly when you release the trigger, but you still should use protective gear.
Edited by: "melted" 8th Mar
Guys - there's more than one way to skin a cat ??? So the old saying goes.
melted8th Mar

If you can live without variable speed, B&Q have one for £25:- …If you can live without variable speed, B&Q have one for £25:- https://www.diy.com/departments/mac-allister-750w-reciprocating-saw-ttb533rsp/1808009_BQ.prdCould have done with a rubberised grip around the neck, but otherwise ok.EDIT: Screwfix are selling the exact same model as the B&Q one with Titan branding for £65



Thanks for this, got one today - it does have a lot of vibration though - had to use gloves.
Don't know how good/bad the supplied blade is as I used a makita one I already had.
Seems to be back to full price now so I've expired it.
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