Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Half Price Challenge Plus CLR 0.1 700C Wheel Size Unisex Road Bike + Free Click & Collect (More in OP) £114.99 @ Argos
317° Expired

Half Price Challenge Plus CLR 0.1 700C Wheel Size Unisex Road Bike + Free Click & Collect (More in OP) £114.99 @ Argos

£114.99£229.9950%Argos Deals
Expert (Beta) 33
Expert (Beta)
Posted 27th Nov 2019Edited by:"apur32"

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Challenge Venture CLR 2.0 700C Wheel Size Unisex Road Bike - £139.99 was £279.99
3344628.jpg
Challenge Dynamic CLR 0.2 700C Wheel Size Unisex Road Bike - £174.99 was £349.993344628-OjrrQ.jpg

Made for the road, this Challenge Plus Road Bike has been designed in conjunction with bike experts at Cycling Plus and Bikeradar. It gives you 14 speed microSHIFT gears and performance road tyres to give you a fast, lightweight riding experience. The alloy frame is lightweight giving you great manoeuvrability and front and rear calliper brakes make stopping easy and safe. The bike also has alloy double wall rims for that added extra. Whether you're cycling for fitness, commuting to work, or just out on a leisure ride this bike can help you do it all.
  • Alloy frame.
  • 14 gears.
  • microSHIFT Shifters gears.
  • Front calliper and rear calliper brakes.
  • Rigid suspension.
  • Steel forks.
  • Weight fully assembled 12.6kg.
  • 21.26 inch frame size.
  • 33 to 42 inch inside leg measurements.
  • Road and trail specific tyres.
  • Alloy rims.
  • Minimal assembly.
Community Updates
If you click through or buy, retailers may pay hotukdeals some money, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.

Groups

Top comments
Fantastic value. The £175 bike is the one to go for it has a decent Claris drivetrain and lowest weight although personally I'm not keen on carbon fibre forks especially at this price level as it will likely be a aluminium steerer with bonded carbon fibre blades which are more prone to failure than all carbon fibre forks (which I'm still not keen on to be honest). The middle price bike has a quick release on the rear wheel despite using a freewheel so will not be ideal for heavy riders who drop on and off pavements. If I was buying I'd personally be tempted to go for the cheapest model and look out for a cheap freehub based rear wheel to replace the existing freewheel based rear wheel. The £175 bike is about 30% faster for the same cadence than the other two due to having a freehub based drivetrain with cassette. I.e. on the flats and downhill it will be easier to go faster as you'd have to have a ridiculously high cadence on the other bikes to match its speed.
33 Comments
That looks significantly better than the usual rubbish offered at this price.
Fantastic value. The £175 bike is the one to go for it has a decent Claris drivetrain and lowest weight although personally I'm not keen on carbon fibre forks especially at this price level as it will likely be a aluminium steerer with bonded carbon fibre blades which are more prone to failure than all carbon fibre forks (which I'm still not keen on to be honest). The middle price bike has a quick release on the rear wheel despite using a freewheel so will not be ideal for heavy riders who drop on and off pavements. If I was buying I'd personally be tempted to go for the cheapest model and look out for a cheap freehub based rear wheel to replace the existing freewheel based rear wheel. The £175 bike is about 30% faster for the same cadence than the other two due to having a freehub based drivetrain with cassette. I.e. on the flats and downhill it will be easier to go faster as you'd have to have a ridiculously high cadence on the other bikes to match its speed.
Thanks op i was looking for a cheap bike. i purchased the Challenge Plus CLR 0.1 700C model but now i am wondering if i will have trouble braking on london streets as i am used to having mountain bike brakes. like anything else i guess i will get used of it in time.
bonzobanana27/11/2019 09:56

If I was buying I'd personally be tempted to go for the cheapest model and …If I was buying I'd personally be tempted to go for the cheapest model and look out for a cheap freehub based rear wheel to replace the existing freewheel based rear wheel.



Is that because it's cheaper to do that or because the cheapest model is better in some way?
DOC196827/11/2019 10:35

Thanks op i was looking for a cheap bike. i purchased the Challenge Plus …Thanks op i was looking for a cheap bike. i purchased the Challenge Plus CLR 0.1 700C model but now i am wondering if i will have trouble braking on london streets as i am used to having mountain bike brakes. like anything else i guess i will get used of it in time.



would'nt worry many London cyclisyts don't seem to bother with brakes at least for pedestrains...

you will need to brake sooner with rim brakes and thin tyres v mountain bikes as the stopping distances are longer.

gerat deal though - tempted to get one as a station bike. seems to be one size only and a little large for me.
Edited by: "afroylnt" 27th Nov 2019
Great value for money and ideal for commuting. 14 gears is all that's required and with the steel forks it will be comfortable. In my opinion, the 7 speed Microshift integrated shifters (which new, costs about £30-40) on the 0.1 model are better than the Shimano Tourney on the 2.0. so there's a perfectly good bike with internal cabling and integrated shifter and decent weighted frame for just £115. The Halford's equivalent - Carrera Zelos - never goes anywhere as cheap as this one.
Edited by: "Biker25" 27th Nov 2019
Avatar
deleted72028
Rodieing is still a thing?
what on earth is that ? lol
ApolloVirtue27/11/2019 11:43

Is that because it's cheaper to do that or because the cheapest model is …Is that because it's cheaper to do that or because the cheapest model is better in some way?


I prefer steel forks and don't see much advantage in the middle priced bike. If you are happy with carbon fibre forks though get the £175 bike its the best bargain here.
bonzobanana27/11/2019 09:56

The £175 bike is about 30% faster for the same cadence than the other two …The £175 bike is about 30% faster for the same cadence than the other two due to having a freehub based drivetrain with cassette.


How this is possible?
Dziambis27/11/2019 13:40

How this is possible?


Yeh, I've tried to research this claim previously and I can't find any data on it!!!
Dziambis27/11/2019 13:40

How this is possible?


Unless he is referring to the gear-ratio which is really quite misleading.
Dziambis27/11/2019 13:40

How this is possible?


The freewheels are quite a low end component with a small central pawl mechanism and lower grade metal so they limit the smallest gear cog to 14T where as the stronger freehub system has a cassette with a smallest cog of 11T so for the same cadence the freehub bike is about 30% faster in the highest gearing assuming the front crankset has the same ratios which they typically do. Obviously it's slightly harder work which is why I said for the same cadence as not everyone could benefit from it but on the flats it will take you longer to get to that speed although downhill is easier. I typically ride in the highest gearing much of the time for long flat or downhill roads but obviously it will vary by rider. It's pretty normal for any freewheel bike to be lower geared that the equivalent freehub bike whatever type of bike it is most of the time.
bonzobanana27/11/2019 18:05

The freewheels are quite a low end component with a small central pawl …The freewheels are quite a low end component with a small central pawl mechanism and lower grade metal so they limit the smallest gear cog to 14T where as the stronger freehub system has a cassette with a smallest cog of 11T so for the same cadence the freehub bike is about 30% faster in the highest gearing assuming the front crankset has the same ratios which they typically do. Obviously it's slightly harder work which is why I said for the same cadence as not everyone could benefit from it but on the flats it will take you longer to get to that speed although downhill is easier. I typically ride in the highest gearing much of the time for long flat or downhill roads but obviously it will vary by rider. It's pretty normal for any freewheel bike to be lower geared that the equivalent freehub bike whatever type of bike it is most of the time.


So it is 14T vs 11T cog, but not cassette vs freewheel!
Cadence is complicated per individual as to what type of cyclist you are crank length gearing and muscle strength, even different bone leg lengths.
Dziambis27/11/2019 18:13

So it is 14T vs 11T cog, but not cassette vs freewheel!


Try and find a Shimano freewheel with 11T.
morrig27/11/2019 20:45

Cadence is complicated per individual as to what type of cyclist you are …Cadence is complicated per individual as to what type of cyclist you are crank length gearing and muscle strength, even different bone leg lengths.


Obviously you can't factor in the engine i.e the person just making a mechanical assessment of the bike itself, clearly a fitter rider on the freewheel equipped road bike would beat a less fit rider on the better freehub equipped road bike. It's just an assessment of the speed of the bike with the same cadence.
bonzobanana27/11/2019 23:50

Try and find a Shimano freewheel with 11T.


I am doing oppositive, looking for 14-28, which are expensive (11speed) or not existing on 8 speed sadly. Don't understand why manufacturers offer 11T instead of 14T on 8 speed cassette's. 11T is overkill for most mortals as 50x11 gives 32 m/ph...
I would rather have closer gear ratio, as I very rarely use smallest cogs, especially on commutes.
Dziambis28/11/2019 01:02

I am doing oppositive, looking for 14-28, which are expensive (11speed) or …I am doing oppositive, looking for 14-28, which are expensive (11speed) or not existing on 8 speed sadly. Don't understand why manufacturers offer 11T instead of 14T on 8 speed cassette's. 11T is overkill for most mortals as 50x11 gives 32 m/ph...I would rather have closer gear ratio, as I very rarely use smallest cogs, especially on commutes.


Typically 14T would be the second smallest cog on many cassettes depends on the brand and model.

Some of the low/short range cassettes only go up one tooth at a time.

bikecalc.com/spe…nce

I personally don't think 11t is overkill, many cassettes come with separate 11T cogs because riders wear them out and need to be replaced before the rest of the cassette. I guess it depends if you are a grinder/masher or spinner plus where you cycle but on long roads I tend to go to the highest gearing unless its slightly uphill or worse. I may not get to it quickly though but build up to it over 100-200m I guess. Let the momentum of the bike dictate when I should change comfortably. I do find many freewheel bikes too low geared especially smaller wheeled bikes like folding bikes with 20" wheels or bikes with 26" wheels. To get a good speed on those bikes the cadence is ridiculously high.
bonzobanana28/11/2019 14:38

Typically 14T would be the second smallest cog on many cassettes depends …Typically 14T would be the second smallest cog on many cassettes depends on the brand and model.Some of the low/short range cassettes only go up one tooth at a time.http://www.bikecalc.com/speed_at_cadenceI personally don't think 11t is overkill, many cassettes come with separate 11T cogs because riders wear them out and need to be replaced before the rest of the cassette. I guess it depends if you are a grinder/masher or spinner plus where you cycle but on long roads I tend to go to the highest gearing unless its slightly uphill or worse. I may not get to it quickly though but build up to it over 100-200m I guess. Let the momentum of the bike dictate when I should change comfortably. I do find many freewheel bikes too low geared especially smaller wheeled bikes like folding bikes with 20" wheels or bikes with 26" wheels. To get a good speed on those bikes the cadence is ridiculously high.


If You spinning out 50x14, Yous hould go PRO!!!
Dziambis28/11/2019 16:28

If You spinning out 50x14, Yous hould go PRO!!!


average cycling cadence is 60 and with 50x14 that is 16.76 mph on a 700c bike according to that bikecalc link above. It would be slower on a 26" or 27.5" wheel sized bike and much slower on a 20" wheeled bike. I don't think 16.76mph is that fast for a bicycle. I think the fastest I've ridden is 42mph downhill and probably 25-28mph on the flats which I've built up to slowly probably with a very slight gradient decline. Admittedly in town with stop and start cycling it's rare to build up much speed but when I used to commute to work it was a long road of about 4-5 miles (dual carriageway).
Was reading an old cycling plus magazine yesterday which had these 3 bikes featured in an article as the bikeradar team helped design the bikes for Challenge/Argos. The cheaper bike has the unbutted frame but sounds like the mid-level and higher end bikes have the same lighter butted tube frame. All have internal cable routing. The frame geometry for all 3 is designed for beginners/comfort. Read like the cheapest bike has 700x23 tyres but the other two had larger tyres 700x25 possibly. Higher spec cockpit on the dearest model, lighter stem and handlebars possibly.

No clue in the article to what factory was used or the country of origin.
bonzobanana30/11/2019 12:15

Was reading an old cycling plus magazine yesterday which had these 3 bikes …Was reading an old cycling plus magazine yesterday which had these 3 bikes featured in an article as the bikeradar team helped design the bikes for Challenge/Argos. The cheaper bike has the unbutted frame but sounds like the mid-level and higher end bikes have the same lighter butted tube frame. All have internal cable routing. The frame geometry for all 3 is designed for beginners/comfort. Read like the cheapest bike has 700x23 tyres but the other two had larger tyres 700x25 possibly. Higher spec cockpit on the dearest model, lighter stem and handlebars possibly.No clue in the article to what factory was used or the country of origin.


I'm trying to figure out which of the current deals is best value for money for my needs and I know nothing about bikes so it's hard. I mainly want a bike for grocery shopping journeys and some recreational use around parks. So should be able to do well with increased weight, withstand potholes and provide good suspension for bumpy journeys. What differences would I notice between a mountain, road and hybrid bike? I found several decent offers, but not sure which is good value and best for my needs so maybe you can help with this:

Carrera Vengeance Limited Edition Mens Mountain Bike (£250)
Schwinn Rocket 5 2020 Mountain Bike (£240, but £180 with my discount code)
GT Palomar 2019 Mountain Bike (£240 but £180 with my discount code)
Raleigh PIONEER 1 CROSSBAR FRAME (£234)
Vitus Vee City Bike (2019) (£220)

Or would one of the bikes in this deal be better? You suggested getting the cheapest one and replacing it with a freewheel based rear wheel, would you still recommend that? If so, how would I know what type of freewheel is compatible?

Thanks in advance!
Edited by: "ApolloVirtue" 1st Dec 2019
ApolloVirtue01/12/2019 08:27

I'm trying to figure out which of the current deals is best value for …I'm trying to figure out which of the current deals is best value for money for my needs and I know nothing about bikes so it's hard. I mainly want a bike for grocery shopping journeys and some recreational use around parks. So should be able to do well with increased weight, withstand potholes and provide good suspension for bumpy journeys. What differences would I notice between a mountain, road and hybrid bike? I found several decent offers, but not sure which is good value and best for my needs so maybe you can help with this:Carrera Vengeance Limited Edition Mens Mountain Bike (£250)Schwinn Rocket 5 2020 Mountain Bike (£240, but £180 with my discount code)GT Palomar 2019 Mountain Bike (£240 but £180 with my discount code)Raleigh PIONEER 1 CROSSBAR FRAME (£234)Vitus Vee City Bike (2019) (£220)Or would one of the bikes in this deal be better? You suggested getting the cheapest one and replacing it with a freewheel based rear wheel, would you still recommend that? If so, how would I know what type of freewheel is compatible?Thanks in advance!



I would definitely add this one to your shortlist.

halfords.com/cyc…mes

It's the best all round bike that can be used pretty much anywhere. Super strong, capable off-road as well as on-road.

I wouldn't buy a bike with suspension unless you are planning to do proper off-road trails. The Subway is super low maintenance and super safe its larger tyre volume makes its very grippy and comfortable on the road.

It's all most people need in my opinion. Although Halfords sell it as a hybrid bike it isn't really its actually a rigid mountain bike. It's all mountain bike components just no suspension fork instead it has a zero maintenance, lower weight and safer rigid fork.
bonzobanana01/12/2019 10:35

I would definitely add this one to your …I would definitely add this one to your shortlist.https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/hybrid-bikes/carrera-subway-1-mens-hybrid-bike-s-m-l-framesIt's the best all round bike that can be used pretty much anywhere. Super strong, capable off-road as well as on-road.I wouldn't buy a bike with suspension unless you are planning to do proper off-road trails. The Subway is super low maintenance and super safe its larger tyre volume makes its very grippy and comfortable on the road.It's all most people need in my opinion. Although Halfords sell it as a hybrid bike it isn't really its actually a rigid mountain bike. It's all mountain bike components just no suspension fork instead it has a zero maintenance, lower weight and safer rigid fork.


Thank you for the recommendation! It's a bit out of my price range, but I'm strongly considering it. Why would you advise against suspension and recommend a mountain bike over a road & hybrid? What do you think of the two £180 bikes I found?
Edited by: "ApolloVirtue" 1st Dec 2019
ApolloVirtue01/12/2019 11:22

Thank you for the recommendation! It's a bit out of my price range, but …Thank you for the recommendation! It's a bit out of my price range, but I'm strongly considering it. Why would you advise against suspension and recommend a mountain bike over a road & hybrid? What do you think of the two £180 bikes I found?


Both those are using low end freewheel drivetrains as you would typically find on sub £100 bikes. The Carrera Vengeance is an entry level real mountain bike but those 2 bikes are more mountain bike style with low end components. The difference between the Carrera Vengeance and Subway is only £10 although admittedly you could make the case the Vengeance is better value as it has a Suntour XCM fork but ultimately I think its about what is the best bike for a wide range of riding and the Subway is better.

As for suspension you have to factor in if you need it, it can have a short life, the seals can fail and be hard to replace, it adds a lot of weight and may need regular servicing, you have to be more careful leaving the bike in the rain as water will get into the forks etc. Typically bikes with suspension forks are slower because of the greater weight. Those two £180 bikes seem to have very poor suspension forks anyway but even if they had decent forks they have low end drivetrains that won't take abuse off-road.

The only real mountain bike in the options you have given is the Carrera Vengeance and it only scrapes into that catagory by the skin of its teeth but is a good introduction. It has Suntour XCM forks which are heavy suspension forks as they are entry level but still real off-road forks for light to medium trails but because they are entry level they use heavier materials so if you use the bike for commuting the 2.5kg weight aprox and slight loss of efficiency due to the movement of the forks if no lockout makes it a much slower bike than the Subway on the road. The Subway is a brilliant all-round bike and probably the best bike for most people who want to do mixed cycling with a single bike and have a bike that is pretty much always ready to ride except for pumping up the tyres.
bonzobanana01/12/2019 12:59

Both those are using low end freewheel drivetrains as you would typically …Both those are using low end freewheel drivetrains as you would typically find on sub £100 bikes. The Carrera Vengeance is an entry level real mountain bike but those 2 bikes are more mountain bike style with low end components. The difference between the Carrera Vengeance and Subway is only £10 although admittedly you could make the case the Vengeance is better value as it has a Suntour XCM fork but ultimately I think its about what is the best bike for a wide range of riding and the Subway is better.As for suspension you have to factor in if you need it, it can have a short life, the seals can fail and be hard to replace, it adds a lot of weight and may need regular servicing, you have to be more careful leaving the bike in the rain as water will get into the forks etc. Typically bikes with suspension forks are slower because of the greater weight. Those two £180 bikes seem to have very poor suspension forks anyway but even if they had decent forks they have low end drivetrains that won't take abuse off-road. The only real mountain bike in the options you have given is the Carrera Vengeance and it only scrapes into that catagory by the skin of its teeth but is a good introduction. It has Suntour XCM forks which are heavy suspension forks as they are entry level but still real off-road forks for light to medium trails but because they are entry level they use heavier materials so if you use the bike for commuting the 2.5kg weight aprox and slight loss of efficiency due to the movement of the forks if no lockout makes it a much slower bike than the Subway on the road. The Subway is a brilliant all-round bike and probably the best bike for most people who want to do mixed cycling with a single bike and have a bike that is pretty much always ready to ride except for pumping up the tyres.


Thank you so much for taking the time to help me with this, it's a huge help for someone who knows 0 about bikes. You seem to know a lot so I trust your opinion and will likely go for the subway when it's back in stock and am looking at if there is anything in good condition that is used, unless you have another reccomendation. Still curious why you are mainly suggest mountain bikes, are they better value at this price-point?
Got the dynamic 0.3 (larger frame). Took it out for a 60k ride and seems great. Thanks for posting. Box says it's from Bangladesh for the user who asked.
Got the dynamic 0.3 (larger frame). Took it out for a 60k ride and seems great. Thanks for posting. Box says it's from Bangladesh for the user who asked.
Any idea on sizing guys for the 174.99 option? It seems to be one size but doesn’t relate to sizing on other sites unless i am being blind. I am five foot seven so ideally need a medium bike.
bang!bang!08/12/2019 19:39

Any idea on sizing guys for the 174.99 option? It seems to be one size but …Any idea on sizing guys for the 174.99 option? It seems to be one size but doesn’t relate to sizing on other sites unless i am being blind. I am five foot seven so ideally need a medium bike.


There's 2 sizes and one of them states goes up to 42" inside leg which seems ridiculously long to me. I'd be very surprised if the smaller of the two sizes didn't fit you, that would be a medium frame I would of thought but the Argos site is not helpful with regard sizing that is for sure. As is the case for budget bikes often there are limited number of sizes in order to reduce costs.
ApolloVirtue02/12/2019 16:30

Thank you so much for taking the time to help me with this, it's a huge …Thank you so much for taking the time to help me with this, it's a huge help for someone who knows 0 about bikes. You seem to know a lot so I trust your opinion and will likely go for the subway when it's back in stock and am looking at if there is anything in good condition that is used, unless you have another reccomendation. Still curious why you are mainly suggest mountain bikes, are they better value at this price-point?


I don't really recommend mountain bikes I try to steer people to bikes that have slightly heavier duty components so they are more reliable with greater strength so maintenance is less of an issue and people ride their bikes more frequently because its more convenient to do so. The Subway isn't a typical mountain bike as it has no suspension but is just an incredibly versatile bike so for those who aren't quite sure where they will use the bike i.e. mixed uses its a very safe recommendation.
bonzobanana08/12/2019 22:37

There's 2 sizes and one of them states goes up to 42" inside leg which …There's 2 sizes and one of them states goes up to 42" inside leg which seems ridiculously long to me. I'd be very surprised if the smaller of the two sizes didn't fit you, that would be a medium frame I would of thought but the Argos site is not helpful with regard sizing that is for sure. As is the case for budget bikes often there are limited number of sizes in order to reduce costs.


Thanks buddy
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text