Half Price Heaters Prices from £4.49 R + C @ Dunelm Mills
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Half Price Heaters Prices from £4.49 R + C @ Dunelm Mills

37
Found 14th Mar 2013
Great prices on 7 different heaters with the dearest at only £33.99 and winter still here grab some heat

37 Comments

Original Poster

Fan heater £4.49
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116256.jpg

Delonghi Oscillating Ceramic Heater Was £39.99 now only £15.99
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30121197.jpg

Traditional Freestanding Electric Log Fireplace Was £69.99 now only £33.99
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116262.jpg

Convection Heater Was £17.99 now only £8.49
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116266.jpg

Mini Fire Place Was £29.99 now only £14.99
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116255.jpg

Streamline Fan Heater Was £11.99 now only £5.99
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116258.jpg
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30116262.jpg

9 Fin Oil Radiator Was £39.99 now only £17.49
http://www.dunelm-mill.com/wcsstore/ConsumerDirectStorefrontAssetStore/images/products/extralarge/30115771.jpg


Edited by: "youchoose" 14th Mar 2013

awesome thanks, just what I was looking for

Banned

heat added !!

cheeers me dears

Does anyone know which of these examples is best for running costs?

Thanks


Sam

fan heater has a huge power consumption i just recently dumped my old delonghi fan heater and bought an oil filled heater.
Edited by: "superivanho" 15th Mar 2013

Checked stock on every item listed local to me (Hatfield) and absolutely nothing availible,

dangermoose5

Does anyone know which of these examples is best for running … Does anyone know which of these examples is best for running costs?ThanksSam


They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want one with more heat it will cost more to run. As simple as that.

pibpob

They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want … They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want one with more heat it will cost more to run. As simple as that.



not too sure if this statement is entirely right as some portion of power has been drawn by fan if you're using a fan heater.

Anyway, the key of power saving is to tune your thermostat to your comfort level.
Edited by: "superivanho" 15th Mar 2013

pibpob

They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want … They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want one with more heat it will cost more to run. As simple as that.


Your kettle produce the same amount of heat per penny but you wouldn't use it for heating, would you?
Is not as simple as that.
The one in the first picture is excellent, the integrated thermostat and the fan help heat up a small room very fast, and only start few minutes in an hour. Recommended.

Kettles? Who said anything about kettles? I was referring to the products in this thread!

The thermostat in the fan heater will not "help heat up a small room very fast". It's the power of the element and the thermal capacity, not the thermostat, which determine this. The thermostat will prevent the heater coming on unnecessarily, but you'll still pay the same amount for a given amount of heat. It might only come on for a few minutes an hour but you'll pay the same as if it were a lower powered heater coming on more often, assuming the same room temperature.

I'm sure you know this but the way you're trying to express yourself is completely muddled.
Edited by: "pibpob" 15th Mar 2013

superivanho

not too sure if this statement is entirely right as some portion of power … not too sure if this statement is entirely right as some portion of power has been drawn by fan if you're using a fan heater.


All that power is eventually converted into heat. It makes no difference.

Anyway, the key of power saving is to tune your thermostat to your … Anyway, the key of power saving is to tune your thermostat to your comfort level.


I agree. Type of electric heater irrelevant (apart from storage heaters which "cheat" by using electricity at a cheaper rate).

superivanho

fan heater has a huge power consumption i just recently dumped my old … fan heater has a huge power consumption i just recently dumped my old delonghi fan heater and bought an oil filled heater.



A 2kw fan heater will cost the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator.

pibpob

Kettles? Who said anything about kettles? I was referring to the … Kettles? Who said anything about kettles? I was referring to the products in this thread!The thermostat in the fan heater will not "help heat up a small room very fast". It's the power of the element and the thermal capacity, not the thermostat, which determine this. The thermostat will prevent the heater coming on unnecessarily, but you'll still pay the same amount for a given amount of heat. It might only come on for a few minutes an hour but you'll pay the same as if it were a lower powered heater coming on more often, assuming the same room temperature.I'm sure you know this but the way you're trying to express yourself is completely muddled.


You're trying too much...
You are expressing a simple physics principle, but not taking into account the actual results. And yes, you are talking about kettles here, since they too would cost you the same as all others, yet will not be as effective in heating your room.

In the same room, although a kettle and any of this devices (which all are around the 2000W mark on their highest setting) will consume the same for the same time they are on, the room will be heated more effectively by some then by others. And simplifying things with your "They all produce EXACTLY the same amount of heat per penny. If you want one with more heat it will cost more to run. As simple as that." it's just putting people in the wrong direction.

The reality is it will cost you less to heat your room with some of them then the others. Which makes it a bit more complicated then you are dismissing the subject.

There is also the PCT factor of a ceramic heater that might help with consumption.
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 15th Mar 2013

seezyf

A 2kw fan heater will cost the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator.



well forgot to add my old fan heater was 2kW and has one setting and my 1.5kW oil filled one has three settings and more effcient to heat up my room. At the end it's how well it distributes heat that matters.
Edited by: "superivanho" 15th Mar 2013

seezyf

A 2kw fan heater will cost the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator.


And a 2kw kettle will cost you the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator, yet you will not use it to warm up your room as it will not be as effective. That was my point. The electric fan heater will need to run for 10 min/hour maybe, the oil filled radiator 30 min/hour for the same temp in the room. So there are differences. As reported by the above user and myself.

MaximusRo

You're trying too much...You are expressing a simple physics principle, … You're trying too much...You are expressing a simple physics principle, but not taking into account the actual results. And yes, you are talking about kettles here, since they too would cost you the same as all others, yet will not be as effective in heating your room.


Yes, because they are turning water into steam, which uses energy without raising the temperature - the latent heat of vapourisation. Why on earth are you banging on about kettles? oO

The reality is it will cost you less to heat your room with some of them … The reality is it will cost you less to heat your room with some of them then the others.


How? Explain to me in simple terms, without using the flawed analogy of a kettle.

There is also the PCT factor of a ceramic heater that might help with … There is also the PCT factor of a ceramic heater that might help with consumption.


Explain that, while you're about it. You mean "PTC" not "PCT" - positive temperature coefficient - which means the resistance of the heater increases as its temperature increases, so its power consumption and corresponding heat output will reduce.

MaximusRo

The electric fan heater will need to run for 10 min/hour maybe, the oil … The electric fan heater will need to run for 10 min/hour maybe, the oil filled radiator 30 min/hour for the same temp in the room. So there are differences.


Assuming even room temperature (yes, if you just want a fan heater to blow hot air on you in an otherwise cold room, of course you will save money, which does not contradict what I said), the only way your statement can be true is if the fan heater has an element three times more powerful than the oil filled radiator, and therefore will cost exactly the same to run.
Edited by: "pibpob" 15th Mar 2013

MaximusRo

And a 2kw kettle will cost you the same to run as a 2kw oil filled … And a 2kw kettle will cost you the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator, yet you will not use it to warm up your room as it will not be as effective. That was my point. The electric fan heater will need to run for 10 min/hour maybe, the oil filled radiator 30 min/hour for the same temp in the room. So there are differences. As reported by the above user and myself.



But an oil filled heater would still be giving heat long after its switched off.

MaximusRo

And a 2kw kettle will cost you the same to run as a 2kw oil filled … And a 2kw kettle will cost you the same to run as a 2kw oil filled radiator, yet you will not use it to warm up your room as it will not be as effective. That was my point. The electric fan heater will need to run for 10 min/hour maybe, the oil filled radiator 30 min/hour for the same temp in the room. So there are differences. As reported by the above user and myself.

you seem wised up with this leccy stuff how much in money does it cost to run an electric blanket on the lowest setting for 1 hour any wise guys know and no tech answers just how much it costs thanks

superivanho

well forgot to add my old fan heater was 2kW and has one setting and my … well forgot to add my old fan heater was 2kW and has one setting and my 1.5kW oil filled one has three settings and more effcient to heat up my room. At the end it's how well it distributes heat that matters.


An oil-filled radiator distributes it heat upwards by convection of hot air. A fan heater distributes it in the direction you're pointing it in. Why does that make an oil-filled radiator cheaper to use to heat up your room?

gcgibsoclark

you seem wised up with this leccy stuff how much in money does it cost … you seem wised up with this leccy stuff how much in money does it cost to run an electric blanket on the lowest setting for 1 hour any wise guys know and no tech answers just how much it costs thanks


Sorry, that's not a simple answer as it depends on the power of the blanket, which is usually marked on it or the controller, but usually only for the maximum setting. The only way of knowing accurately is to plug it in via a power meter. I presume you don't baulk at the trivial maths involved in converting power to cost: multiply the power in watts by the time in hours and for every 1000 you use one unit. Then you have the further complication of working out how much a unit costs - blame your cynical electricity supplier for that.

Suffice to say that it will be much cheaper keeping yourself warm with an electric blanket than heating the room with an electric heater of any sort (and getting free mould if you use MaximusRo's suggestion of a kettle).

seezyf

But an oil filled heater would still be giving heat long after its … But an oil filled heater would still be giving heat long after its switched off.


I'm afraid that is exactly cancelled out by the longer time it takes to warm up in the first place. It is a myth that oil-filled radiators cost less to run because they "store heat". The heat they store has to come from somewhere. The slow response time makes them in practice more inconvenient and costly to run because most people can't anticipate when they need to turn the heater on and off.
Edited by: "pibpob" 15th Mar 2013

pibpob

An oil-filled radiator distributes it heat upwards by convection of hot … An oil-filled radiator distributes it heat upwards by convection of hot air. A fan heater distributes it in the direction you're pointing it in. Why does that make an oil-filled radiator cheaper to use to heat up your room?



I don't move my fan heater around. My room is quite long in terms of its layout and my bed is at the opposite end of the heater. I want a uniform distribution of heat in my room instead of concentrating heating on a particular area.

Mate theoretical talking is meaningless. if you wanna go further why not proof it to me with a thermal-fluid transient CFD analysis?
Edited by: "superivanho" 15th Mar 2013

pibpob

Sorry, that's not a simple answer as it depends on the power of the … Sorry, that's not a simple answer as it depends on the power of the blanket, which is usually marked on it or the controller, but usually only for the maximum setting. The only way of knowing accurately is to plug it in via a power meter. I presume you don't baulk at the trivial maths involved in converting power to cost: multiply the power in watts by the time in hours and for every 1000 you use one unit. Then you have the further complication of working out how much a unit costs - blame your cynical electricity supplier for that.Suffice to say that it will be much cheaper keeping yourself warm with an electric blanket than heating the room with an electric heater of any sort (and getting free mould if you use MaximusRo's suggestion of a kettle).

thanks for the info the blanket is 90watt ?

gcgibsoclark

thanks for the info the blanket is 90watt ?

gcgibsoclark

thanks for the info the blanket is 90watt ?


Well on full power then it would take 0.09 units per hour, so if a unit cost 15p, that would be less than one and a half pence per hour.
It will cost less than that on the low setting, of course.

superivanho

I don't move my fan heater around. My room is quite long in terms of its … I don't move my fan heater around. My room is quite long in terms of its layout and my bed is at the opposite end of the heater. I want a uniform distribution of heat in my room instead of concentrating heating on a particular area.


That's good, because it simplifies matters.

Mate theoretical talking is meaningless. if you wanna go further why not … Mate theoretical talking is meaningless. if you wanna go further why not proof it to me with a thermal-fluid transient CFD analysis?


Prove what? That oil-filled radiators and fan heaters have different efficiencies in converting electrical energy (and hence cost) into heat? The law of conservation of energy is one of the most basic principles in physics, and if you somehow think you have overcome it then you should be a billionaire by now. It is not up to me to prove a principle which the entire world accepts; it us up to you to prove that it is incorrect. You are being about as convincing as a bible-basher who argues against evolution on the grounds that it is described as a "theory".
Edited by: "pibpob" 15th Mar 2013

superivanho

I don't move my fan heater around. My room is quite long in terms of its … I don't move my fan heater around. My room is quite long in terms of its layout and my bed is at the opposite end of the heater. I want a uniform distribution of heat in my room instead of concentrating heating on a particular area.

Mate theoretical talking is meaningless. if you wanna go further why not … Mate theoretical talking is meaningless. if you wanna go further why not proof it to me with a thermal-fluid transient CFD analysis?



To proof that statment you made:

An oil-filled radiator distributes it heat upwards by convection of hot air. A fan heater distributes it in the direction you're pointing it in. Why does that make an oil-filled radiator cheaper to use to heat up your room?

In the world of engineering there are many ways to proof things. I wasn't asking you to proof the law of conservation of energy but to ask you proof an oil filled radiator is not efficient than a fan heater on the scenario for my room. One way to validate the answer is to run a computational simulation setting up appropriate conditions on the model, then setting up targets such as you want to warm up the whole room at above temperature of 25degC everywhere.

Edited by: "superivanho" 15th Mar 2013

thanks a lot for blanket answer .dont have to worry im using too much now

All this debate and off topic subjects. Has anyone actual manage to buy one most are out of stock nearly everywhere I have checked from Southampton to Sunderland.
Edited by: "OBH6UK" 15th Mar 2013

superivanho

To proof that statment you made:An oil-filled radiator distributes it … To proof that statment you made:An oil-filled radiator distributes it heat upwards by convection of hot air. A fan heater distributes it in the direction you're pointing it in. Why does that make an oil-filled radiator cheaper to use to heat up your room?In the world of engineering there are many ways to proof things. I wasn't asking you to proof the law of conservation of energy but to ask you proof an oil filled radiator is not efficient than a fan heater on the scenario for my room. One way to validate the answer is to run a computational simulation setting up appropriate conditions on the model, then setting up targets such as you want to warm up the whole room at above temperature of 25degC everywhere.


Why are you asking me to prove [that's the word by the way - "proof" is a noun] something I'm denying? oO

pibpob

Why are you asking me to prove [that's the word by the way - "proof" is a … Why are you asking me to prove [that's the word by the way - "proof" is a noun] something I'm denying? oO



lol your so much a grammar nazi

picked up 2 of the belonghi black heather today for my self reserved another 3 for family. worth the money better then them blinding heligon ones.

Got 2 delonghi heaters from southport this morning for our caravan awning, going to try them out shortly. Thanks for the deal.

reserved one in colchester, drove all the way there to be told they dont have it - phone call would have been nice! back to freezing my ass off at work because NO where has fan heaters in stock

Original Poster

hem9788

reserved one in colchester, drove all the way there to be told they dont … reserved one in colchester, drove all the way there to be told they dont have it - phone call would have been nice! back to freezing my ass off at work because NO where has fan heaters in stock


To be honest if it was a long drive I would have made a phone call to the store to double check they were in stock
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