Half Price Winter Heat Stoves from £156 @ Toolbox
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Half Price Winter Heat Stoves from £156 @ Toolbox

38
Found 27th Sep 2013
The prices range from £156 to £374. Should be good to get ready for winter

38 Comments

Great prices, pity delivery costs are close to £70 for me. Heat added.
Edited by: "Gball" 27th Sep 2013

Had to smile at the review in which they state it was bought for a house warming present :-)

I think you have to purchase the flue separately for this adding another £50 - £100 depending on flue length.

homeoffice2020

I think you have to purchase the flue separately for this adding another … I think you have to purchase the flue separately for this adding another £50 - £100 depending on flue length.

Actually, it's quite a bit more complicated than it seems as you need to fit and seal a registration plate in the fire opening for the flue to pass through. Also, you may need to have the chimney lined from fireplace to chimney pot.

How do I know, I've just fitted an inset stove but fortunately didn't need to line the whole chimney.

A full chimney lining in stainless steel will cost around £1,000 fitted, depending on where you live it could be double this. If you plan to do it yourself, bear in mind it needs to be done from the roof downwards and if you fall off and are not professionally equipped, with insurance to match, - I'm sure I don't need to spell out the consequences.

The whole idea of a multi-fuel stove is great as it keeps you free of the dreaded gas and electric if there's a power cut or failure. Bear in mind that if you plan to use it a reasonable amount, you do need to buy and store either the smokeless fuel or the wood. Neither fuel is cheap in small quantities and so you will need a dry area under cover for storage. Most of the wood deliveries are best purchased as kiln dried and come in 1 cubic metre dump bags and that will give you some idea of the size of the storage space you need. In reality, once stacked, that amount of wood will fit into a log store that's 2m x 1m x 0.75m and such a storage unit will cost you around £175 to buy, ready built, and somewhat less if you buy the timber to build it yourself.

So, buying the stove is just the tip of the iceberg, the initial £400 purchase could very easily turn into £2,000 once you take into account the fitting and if you need a stainless liner for your chimney.

Don't get me wrong, I think they are a great idea, after all I have just fitted one, but not something to be rushed into without finding out what the end cost will be and taking into account fuel costs and storage.

I have a 20'x10'x8' high old
summer house full of seasoned logs I've sawn with the chainsaw. So I'm thinking of installing a log burner but I don't have a chimney.






Wowhats

I have a 20'x10'x8' high old summer house full of seasoned logs I've sawn … I have a 20'x10'x8' high old summer house full of seasoned logs I've sawn with the chainsaw. So I'm thinking of installing a log burner but I don't have a chimney.

If your room has an outside wall, you can get an external flue/chimney that fixes to the outside wall and does what's needed - I'm guessing you don't live on the 28th floor of a tower block - 'cause you've got a summer house.

You can't beat a woodburner/multifuel stove.Its not for everyone but it keeps my gas bill down.Trick is to get as much free wood, pallets etc and cut it all up in the summer ready for winter.

cibarious

Actually, it's quite a bit more complicated than it seems as you need to … Actually, it's quite a bit more complicated than it seems as you need to fit and seal a registration plate in the fire opening for the flue to pass through. Also, you may need to have the chimney lined from fireplace to chimney pot. How do I know, I've just fitted an inset stove but fortunately didn't need to line the whole chimney. A full chimney lining in stainless steel will cost around £1,000 fitted, depending on where you live it could be double this. If you plan to do it yourself, bear in mind it needs to be done from the roof downwards and if you fall off and are not professionally equipped, with insurance to match, - I'm sure I don't need to spell out the consequences.The whole idea of a multi-fuel stove is great as it keeps you free of the dreaded gas and electric if there's a power cut or failure. Bear in mind that if you plan to use it a reasonable amount, you do need to buy and store either the smokeless fuel or the wood. Neither fuel is cheap in small quantities and so you will need a dry area under cover for storage. Most of the wood deliveries are best purchased as kiln dried and come in 1 cubic metre dump bags and that will give you some idea of the size of the storage space you need. In reality, once stacked, that amount of wood will fit into a log store that's 2m x 1m x 0.75m and such a storage unit will cost you around £175 to buy, ready built, and somewhat less if you buy the timber to build it yourself.So, buying the stove is just the tip of the iceberg, the initial £400 purchase could very easily turn into £2,000 once you take into account the fitting and if you need a stainless liner for your chimney.Don't get me wrong, I think they are a great idea, after all I have just fitted one, but not something to be rushed into without finding out what the end cost will be and taking into account fuel costs and storage.



We had this Morso Badger (£950) stove fitted last year which included digging out an old conventional fire place to reveal a lovely big old inglenook hiding behind it, complete with oak beam. The work took a week and included fitting an RSJ (to help support the stack), chimney flue, large chimney pot and loads of brick work. Total was £3200 which considering it included the decent quality stove seemed excellent value and has probably raised the value of the house much more than the cost and we love it.

http://i41.tinypic.com/i799ie.jpg
Edited by: "toaster" 27th Sep 2013

witters21

You can't beat a woodburner/multifuel stove.Its not for everyone but it … You can't beat a woodburner/multifuel stove.Its not for everyone but it keeps my gas bill down.Trick is to get as much free wood, pallets etc and cut it all up in the summer ready for winter.



Being doing just that this week, there's a haulage distribution depot down the road that gives away pallets.

Dont you need building regs inspection for burners over 4.5 kW output too? I remember my dad conning the inspector from the council his was only a small one not the 6.5kw it said on the documents...

Hot

robw1978

Dont you need building regs inspection for burners over 4.5 kW output … Dont you need building regs inspection for burners over 4.5 kW output too? I remember my dad conning the inspector from the council his was only a small one not the 6.5kw it said on the documents...



The firm we employed were HETAS registered and signed ours off without an inspection.

It will require fitting by a Hetas registered installer, even if you try and get building control to register it - they will just tell you to find a Hetas guy to register it.

I wouldn't ever fit a cheap stove like this one, look for one of the big names, or find an antique that has stood the test of time.

Also worth bearing in mind, unless you have access to a free supply of timber, wood cost more than either gas or oil per kWh. Still with logs you get a warm three times, cutting it, storing it and finally burning it.

cibarious

Actually, it's quite a bit more complicated than it seems as you need to … Actually, it's quite a bit more complicated than it seems as you need to fit and seal a registration plate in the fire opening for the flue to pass through. Also, you may need to have the chimney lined from fireplace to chimney pot. How do I know, I've just fitted an inset stove but fortunately didn't need to line the whole chimney. A full chimney lining in stainless steel will cost around £1,000 fitted, depending on where you live it could be double this. If you plan to do it yourself, bear in mind it needs to be done from the roof downwards and if you fall off and are not professionally equipped, with insurance to match, - I'm sure I don't need to spell out the consequences.The whole idea of a multi-fuel stove is great as it keeps you free of the dreaded gas and electric if there's a power cut or failure. Bear in mind that if you plan to use it a reasonable amount, you do need to buy and store either the smokeless fuel or the wood. Neither fuel is cheap in small quantities and so you will need a dry area under cover for storage. Most of the wood deliveries are best purchased as kiln dried and come in 1 cubic metre dump bags and that will give you some idea of the size of the storage space you need. In reality, once stacked, that amount of wood will fit into a log store that's 2m x 1m x 0.75m and such a storage unit will cost you around £175 to buy, ready built, and somewhat less if you buy the timber to build it yourself.So, buying the stove is just the tip of the iceberg, the initial £400 purchase could very easily turn into £2,000 once you take into account the fitting and if you need a stainless liner for your chimney.Don't get me wrong, I think they are a great idea, after all I have just fitted one, but not something to be rushed into without finding out what the end cost will be and taking into account fuel costs and storage.



So glad the new house we have bought already has a log burner installed. Was one of the only two things I wanted - log burner and a garage. Not moved in yet though, still waiting on the myriad of paperwork and legal stuff to complete.
Good info though on the logs, hoping to snag some cheap from a mate who does tree-surgery for a living, will be nice to cut the gas usage down to a bare minimum with the way prices are heading on it now. Next year I can spend the time foraging while out walking the dogs on the look out for downed tree branches and the like - one of the good points of living out in the sticks

I've used our Morso Squirrel for the first time since the previous Winter tonight after a full overhaul after many years. Replaced the iron baffle (that had bent and a sizable hole directly under the chimney), the heat bricks had cracked and the door seals and glass. In short, I was piling on the logs last year and getting very little heat out of it; had the chimney swept and the guy mentioned these issues and spent over £150 to replace the bits and cleaned it up using Stovax Black Graphite polish; if yours is looking a bit tired this IS the stuff to buy as ours is as new now!

Anyway, the little beauty is kicking out heat like I've never felt before and had to open the windows as it's too hot; it was a trial run and appreciate that it's not that cold at the moment, but got an extra 6 degrees of heat. I'm also using half as many logs as I was last year and it's significantly more efficient. The point of this post is that if you do have a wood/multi fuel burner, it'll be worthwhile checking the internals of your kit and I can wholeheartedly say that it was worth the outlay to purchase the bits to get it cooking on gas, well wood, again!

Must be fitted by a HETAS qualified fitter otherwise your house insurance won't pay out in the event of a house fire. Get a carbon monoxide detector too.

Here's mine :-
http://i45.tinypic.com/eg4h8j.jpg

@JunkMail - where's the rest of you???

Had a Morso squirrel fitted last year. Just remember it's not compulsory to have the chimney lined, this is the big earner for fitters. The company that fitted mine were the longest established company I got a quote from and the only one who said it didn't need lining.

Three things to say here:

1/ The ashes need cleaning out all the time
2/ The soot! On everything....
3/ Even with doors on, a real fire needs watching, all the time. And tending. And feeding. And.....life's too short.

I was a slave to one of these,in a country house, for years. And I bless the day I moved into a house with gas.

Don't be fooled! They may look cute. They are nothing but WORK.

thc

Had a Morso squirrel fitted last year. Just remember it's not compulsory … Had a Morso squirrel fitted last year. Just remember it's not compulsory to have the chimney lined, this is the big earner for fitters. The company that fitted mine were the longest established company I got a quote from and the only one who said it didn't need lining.



You're correct ........ however - to comply with HETAS the chimney needs to be thoroughly tested / examined which costs as much as having a flue put in. From my experience both Building Control, Installers & Insurance Companies frown on unlined chimneys.
Stoves draw much better & get up to operating temp much faster with a liner.
Also remember that that any stove over 5kw needs to have a vent in the room

Unless you have a regular & reliable source of wood which you can be bothered to saw & have the room to store Stoves are an expensive luxury. Palletwood burns real fast. 3'x2' CLS is about the smallest you want unless you enjoy constantly topping up.
Coal is great for overnight burning as you can throttle down the fire to a slow burn & it will run all night.

We have 2 8kw Stoves at our house & a 5kw at our Business - they are lovely but take a great deal of effort to manage!
Edited by: "NYLONZ" 29th Sep 2013

NYLONZ

You're correct ........ however - to comply with HETAS the chimney needs … You're correct ........ however - to comply with HETAS the chimney needs to be thoroughly tested / examined which costs as much as having a flue put in. From my experience both Building Control, Installers & Insurance Companies frown on unlined chimneys.Stoves draw much better & get up to operating temp much faster with a liner.



Well, the quote was less than half the others. Smoke leak test and visual examination don't cost that much. And those companies can frown all they like, it's legal.

I have a Parkray Chiltern 111 closed appliance built into a chimney. House is early 1900's and chimney not lined. Runs 24/7. Provides hot water and powers all my radiators. I remove the ash once a day this time of year, twice a day mid winter. Fired on Ancit. So I disagree with nothing but work quote. It's pretty easy to maintain. Any appliance using wood is going to be hassle in my opinion. I'm not suggesting anyone install a solid fuel boiler to run on briquettes unless you are loaded. It would cost a fortune to run it. I work in the solid fuel industry and get concessionary fuel. However to run small room heater type stoves briquettes are a good option. They burn very hot, so you don't need to stack your heater full. Also they give off far more heat than wood and last for hours and hours.

Some people don't have a clue and just want to keep up with the neighbours.
Unless you have a free supply of wood, don't bother getting one of these as there is no cheaper fuel than gas or oil.
I work in forestry and have plenty of free firewood but there is still plenty of work to do before its sitting in a basket beside the fire.

Edited by: "agnostic" 29th Sep 2013

Just the job for sending all the heat up the chimney and drawing in cold draughts from outside. No thanks.

We had a Morso Squirrel. Lasted all of 8 years until it literally rusted and cracked to bits, probably because of an ill-fitting cowl and being by the coast. To replace it was going to cost over £1000, so got one of these.

Conclusion? The Morso isn't 5 times better! The 4.5 of these is a bit smaller and not quite as nicely finished but for a holiday home it does the job very nearly as well.
Edited by: "stanno" 29th Sep 2013

Does anyone know roughly how much it costs to have one signed off?

I've had help from a friend to install ours (He's in the trade) but he's not Hetas registered so just looking for it to be signed of really.

Any knowledge imparted would be appreciated.

Cheers.

stanno

We had a Morso Squirrel. Lasted all of 8 years until it literally rusted … We had a Morso Squirrel. Lasted all of 8 years until it literally rusted and cracked to bits, probably because of an ill-fitting cowl and being by the coast. To replace it was going to cost over £1000, so got one of these. Conclusion? The Morso isn't 5 times better! The 4.5 of these is a bit smaller and not quite as nicely finished but for a holiday home it does the job very nearly as well.



Morso cast iron stoves have a 10 year guarantee one of the longest in the stove market, plus they guarantee to hold spare parts for at least 10 years after a product has been discontinued, we were sold our Badger on the recommendation of the installers who claimed they were the most reliable including with spares, the firm were authorised dealers of most of the big name stoves.

bootmet

I have a Parkray Chiltern 111 closed appliance built into a chimney. … I have a Parkray Chiltern 111 closed appliance built into a chimney. House is early 1900's and chimney not lined. Runs 24/7. Provides hot water and powers all my radiators. I remove the ash once a day this time of year, twice a day mid winter. Fired on Ancit. So I disagree with nothing but work quote. It's pretty easy to maintain. Any appliance using wood is going to be hassle in my opinion. I'm not suggesting anyone install a solid fuel boiler to run on briquettes unless you are loaded. It would cost a fortune to run it. I work in the solid fuel industry and get concessionary fuel. However to run small room heater type stoves briquettes are a good option. They burn very hot, so you don't need to stack your heater full. Also they give off far more heat than wood and last for hours and hours.


I would burn coal in mine if it weren't so expensive these days. That's why I burn wood which I get for free from a local company. All I have to do is to go and collect it.

Jefft

Just the job for sending all the heat up the chimney and drawing in cold … Just the job for sending all the heat up the chimney and drawing in cold draughts from outside. No thanks.



Most modern stoves are at least 80% efficient, a traditional open coal fire about 25% - work it out for yourself. If you live away from mains gas in a rural areas wood burners make total sense.

pouster07

Does anyone know roughly how much it costs to have one signed off?I've … Does anyone know roughly how much it costs to have one signed off?I've had help from a friend to install ours (He's in the trade) but he's not Hetas registered so just looking for it to be signed of really.Any knowledge imparted would be appreciated.Cheers.



go to green living forum (woodburners section) ...& look at Fahrenheits posts (good tradesman) & Navitron renewables forum, for decent info with regards to liners or not, wood, (kiln dried ..you are having a laugh) ..seasoning wood will draw the moisture out, have enough for a winters worth realistically & then grab some to season.

Moisture meters ..a pre-requisite.
Decent sweep rods (bailey brush set)
Invest in a good WB stove on the basis of low quality units leak like sieves (& thus less efficient / less burn control).
Don't guess on size, work it out based on your insulation & wprk making the heated room as leak proof as possible.

don't burn lleyandi, too sticky, will tar up your chimney quickly & make for hard cleaning / chimney fires.

look at the stove efficiency % in combination with your room as is & how it should be to current regs (slap some pir foil/foil foam up!

get a carbon monoxide alarm.

IF you need to reline your chimney be aware of the vastly differing prices of liner, get it right!
again with reference to liners if you sweep yourself then make sure your brush head is compatible.

(my chimney takes 10 minutes to rod (by design) & after a hard burning season there is a handful of soot, clean burning is the ideal).

get a stovepipe thermometer, whilst not perfect they are a good way to learn to get to know your stove.

A decent WBS & decent fuel can start putting heat into a room within 10 minutes of a single match light.

An efficiently used woodburner only needs emptying out (ashpan) once every 5 days typically)

A WBS is different to a multi-fuel as is the liner (if required) so understand this as it affects cost.

If your WBS is belching smoke out of a chimney something is wrong, a clean burning stove should only emit a vague wisp typically non visible to the eye.

most chimney cowls are a complete waste of time, the best out there for most problems is th good old fashioned H-pot, clay preferably.

We sweep 1x after the burn season & once in the summer just prior to re-lighting, having checked the WBS inside & out for cracked tiles, loose screws retaining the glass, & tightening the door handle mechanism.

A good wbs is soon outstrips the install costs, pushing out plenty of dry heat, we tend to watch the flames of our stove more than tv.

don't burn wet wood, don't burn particulate board etc (nasty toxins) & leave an ash bed in your woodburned (don't scrape it all out)
Stick a LCD thermomotor in the room (far side typically) to gauge heat spread, a seemingly dead fire can be roaring back into life within a few minutes, you don't need to keep it fed like a steam train!

OLd types of woodburner are different to modern ie modern are not designed to overnight slumber (inneficiency in the complete burn cycle) though some do well regardless) slower burns thus choke your chimney based on lower overall temps of gases which change as they exit the stove & cool in the chimney.

if you've got an open fire replace it! (often operate in negative efficiency percentages sadly).
As was stated by a morso owner you do need to maintain them, spares now & again ongoing, (eg that heat deflector plate), fibreglass rope for doors & seals, fire bricks etc.

ideally having 2 air feeds one top 1x bottom gives you better control of air supply & therefore burn, very handy for extreme atmospheric changes & prevailing winds which screw things up from time to time.

woodburners are a learning curve, which we wouldn't be without.

(Austroflamm G3 owner)

If I were buying a stove i'd look at this navitron.org.uk/pag…=85 & perhaps invest in a burley stovewith an exterior air supply, these are super efficient for those who burn good wood, seasoned!

navitron.org.uk/pro…161

Always take advice though from a professional who can spot possible trauma's before they happen, & if you re-line, buy a good one.

many good stoves on the market, but many more bad ones too..
whatstove.co.uk/ ..not a bad site, however lots of stoves inevitably rum & reviewed by folk who aren't too au fait with their requirements, it's a learning curve, but good insight regardless).

hetas / govt regs are easier to understand than you initially think, pertainign to hearth height, proximity to combustibles, ventilation (also known as leaky houses, rather than having vents smashed through your brickwork) ...all a matter of reading up & finding good tradesmen.

Good luck

wouldn't budget less than £500 on a woodburner myself though, (ebay for some good deals in summer, or "grey metal" for some sub £500 units, there is a lot of conjecture with regards to chinese built machine-mart catalogue burners lifespan, leakiness, efficiency & spares, ...after all you don't want to be up & feeding the uncontrollable ire every 10 minutes.

recommend that anyone looking at a wood burning stove looks closely at the way the really expensive ones are put together (handles, closures etc, then uses the same knowledge on cheaper models, to find a happy medium.

knowledge is power which saves you time & effort according to how much effort you want to put in!

A lot of good, sensible advice there MR GUS. We've been using our woodburner for about three years now and we love it but there's more to it than meets the eye. It doesn't take too long to gain the necessary experience though and it's not that much work once you're used to it. You're going to need a lot of room to store all the wood though. You'll use more than you think, especially in a cold winter.

After years of holidaying in log cabins & loving relaxing with a real wood fire we are getting a stove fitted when we move into our new house. Nowt to do with keeping up with the neighbours agnostic.

Is there not an issue with burning pallets or insufficiently dried wood in one of these? i.e. creation of creosote etc in the flue which can lead to disaster.

RobiCraig

After years of holidaying in log cabins & loving relaxing with a real … After years of holidaying in log cabins & loving relaxing with a real wood fire we are getting a stove fitted when we move into our new house. Nowt to do with keeping up with the neighbours agnostic.Is there not an issue with burning pallets or insufficiently dried wood in one of these? i.e. creation of creosote etc in the flue which can lead to disaster.



There are different markings for differently treated pallets which once spotted is an instant indicator as to useable or otherwise, (some are heat treated & others are chemical treatment) ..then there is to consider what it's had on it.

Can't recall the identifying lettering but a quick google should get you there.

(nb if collecting pallets it's far better to know how to cut them prior to loading otherwise lots of dead space in your vehicle), especially if you come across a decent amount at a location.

pouster07

Does anyone know roughly how much it costs to have one signed off?I've … Does anyone know roughly how much it costs to have one signed off?I've had help from a friend to install ours (He's in the trade) but he's not Hetas registered so just looking for it to be signed of really.Any knowledge imparted would be appreciated.Cheers.



Expect to pay about £300-£400 to get it signed off, the best part of a days work. A lot of installers won't even do this.

Original Poster

themorgatron

Expect to pay about £300-£400 to get it signed off, the best part of a d … Expect to pay about £300-£400 to get it signed off, the best part of a days work. A lot of installers won't even do this.



Is this a legal requirement? Or a recommendation?
thanks

rosh3000

Is this a legal requirement? Or a recommendation?thanks



The installation of a wood burner is legally required to be notified to your local building control. The benefit of Hetas is the installer can 'self certify' and notify it himself. The alternative is ask a building control officer to come round and certify the installation ( ~£120) is to standard, the problem is the officers are clueless so will insist you get a Hetas guy to certify it!

If it's in your own home then there isn't a lot anyone can do, certainly if they have no knowledge about it. The only problems that can arise are if you try selling the house or if there's an accident due to the installation.

If you are looking for a cheap woodburner I'd take a look a these guys ....been around for a few years now, EU manufactured compared to some very dubious chinese units, won't last yopu forever but good price for the output, welded steel has come a long way (it used to be cast irons "poorer brother"

However I digress, a nice non folksy contemporary looking stove for £220, (around £260 delivered) with some stovepipe 5kW "nominal" output & a tested 73% efficiency rating you could do far worse, bonus having 2 air feeds for added controlability

I'dconsider one of these for my workshop

Being a wood stove fan I do have a nosey around cheap & expensive big brands & am often dissapointed at the way both are built, so look at more than just the front of the stove if you are contemplating an investment, there's a lot to be said for a door closure catch! (my first judgement) hinges, vermiculite bricks, replacement costs etc....

http://greymetal.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=149

Or if looking for a big output 9+ kW then this fella with airwash ...CHEAP!!!!! '£249 basic cost http://greymetal.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=240

Just don't burn crud wet wood / low quality wood & insulate your room to keep heat in longer.
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