Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Hisense H55B7500UK UHD HDR Smart 4K TV with Freeview Play £329 @ Amazon
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Hisense H55B7500UK UHD HDR Smart 4K TV with Freeview Play £329 @ Amazon

Expert (Beta)33
Expert (Beta)
Posted 30th JunEdited by:"reindeer333"

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Reduced price offer on this TV at Amazon Hopefully this deal might be of use if you have lots of gift cards which need to be used etc...!

  • Dolby Vision HDR - delivers highlights up to 40 times brighter and blacks 10 times darker.
  • Unibody design - seamless, design simplicity.
  • Smooth Motion Rate 100 - smoother, more fluid picture.
  • Wide Colour Gamut - wider range of shades on display.
  • DTS Studio Sound - volume levelling, bass enhancement, speaker EQ and dialog enhancement technology.
  • VIDAA U 3.0 Smart TV - access Netflix, Prime Video, YouTube, Freeview Play and more.
  • Freeview Play - catch up on the last 7 days via BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, All 4, Demand 5 and UKTV Play.
  • Includes 2 years UK manufacturer warranty

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No gift voucher, but still a good price, thanks for your first post op
33 Comments
No gift voucher, but still a good price, thanks for your first post op
Decent sound on these and good value
Also available for £379 from John Lewis with 5 year warranty:
johnlewis.com/his…360

Heated added for OP's deal.
Edited by: "CraigT" 30th Jun
MrSwitch30/06/2020 17:22

No gift voucher, but still a good price, thanks for your first post op …No gift voucher, but still a good price, thanks for your first post op


Hahahaha
Miracast?
SD to HD upscale?
Voice remote?
CraigT30/06/2020 17:33

Also available for £379 from John Lewis with 5 year …Also available for £379 from John Lewis with 5 year warranty:https://www.johnlewis.com/hisense-h55b7500uk-2019-led-hdr-4k-ultra-hd-smart-tv-55-inch-with-freeview-play-black-silver/p4083360Heated added for OP's deal.


£379
mickymcd30/06/2020 17:54

£379


Err, yes as I stated.
Just offering an alternative option, if the extra 3 year warranty is worth more than the £50 difference to anyone.
CraigT30/06/2020 18:13

Err, yes as I stated.Just offering an alternative option, if the extra 3 …Err, yes as I stated.Just offering an alternative option, if the extra 3 year warranty is worth more than the £50 difference to anyone.


Looks as though John Lewis not getting anymore stock grr know they sometimes price match but with added bonus of the longer warranty
forcedv30/06/2020 17:37

Miracast?SD to HD upscale?Voice remote?


Yes, terrible, needs a new remote or Alexa app/speaker
Heat - great price.
Won't deliver to NI, I hate that as get to checkout then won't deliver to post code ffs
Michael_Hayes30/06/2020 19:40

Won't deliver to NI, I hate that as get to checkout then won't deliver to …Won't deliver to NI, I hate that as get to checkout then won't deliver to post code ffs


Moved to NI 10 years ago. Accepted the fact that few things would not ship here from mainland and miss out on deals like these. But feel happy that I don't pay rates while renting and don't pay for prescription and also houses are cheaper to own. So give or take we get most things shipped and I feel contented
Saw this in Costco Chadderton last week for £312 for those who are members and nearby. Comes with the usual 5 year Costco warranty too.
Edited by: "nazlfc" 30th Jun
Showing as £379, JL have a better warrenty
Edited by: "Mikey1878" 30th Jun
54% review on Which.co.uk

REVIEWED AUG 2019
Overview

If anything, Hisense is going the other way. This mid-range set is easily in the bottom end of the 4K TVs we've tested this year.

What is it?

It's a 55-inch 4K TV from Hisense's mid-range 7500 series. It's not too basic, so still benefits from Dolby Vision HDR, which is designed to improve on the current HDR industry standard by adjusting contrast on a scene-by-scene basis. HDR10, which is also supported, can't do this, so Dolby Vision enabled content should have more balanced contrast.

4K HDR content is more common than ever and worth seeking out to see your TV at its best. You still need to pay to watch the majority of it unfortunately, but the wide variety of content mean it's worth signing up for Netflix or Amazon Prime Video to see what all the fuss is about.

SD and HD channels are still available for free through the satellite and Freeview tuners. You just need an aerial or satellite to watch.

The three HDMI inputs and two USB ports at the rear are easy to reach. Any cables you've connected can be passed through the stand keeping them neat and partially out of sight.

What's the picture quality like?

The 7500 falls into many typical traps. Colours are unnatural and the yellowy tinge has actors looking like they need a trip to the doctor's before their next casting, while contrast is too bright. This is a less common issue, usually the contrast skews too dark, but the effect is the same: detail is lost.

As we climbed up the resolutions only sharpness improved. The same issues affecting the SD picture are just as evident in 4K, and were worse in some cases. Transitioning between colours should be smooth, almost imperceptible, but they were jarringly bad in one of our test scenes.

HDR does virtually nothing. Contrast is still too bright and detail gets lost in the gleam.

We haven't found too many TVs that have struggled with off-putting digital artefacts, but the 7500 suffers. Halo-ing, where the area around an object appears distorted, and noise, which looks like static on flat areas of colour plague the picture at every resolution.

What about the sound?

There's more bass than we detected in the 65-inch 7500 and this helps the 55-incher to three stars for sound, but only just. It's still unbalanced favouring the top-end, but don't expect bright bursts of auditory excitement. The brilliance is weak.

One of the HDMI inputs is HDMI ARC, so it's easy to attach a sound bar or surround-sound system. It doesn't have one of the newer HDMI eARC inputs. It works similarly to HDMI ARC but can transfer higher-quality audio. We'll probably only see this on the most high-end TVs for now and it's not something a TV must have to consider buying it.

What's it like to use?

Slow. Menus take too long to open and the TV doesn't react quickly enough to presses of the remote. It's something you'd likely get used to, but you shouldn't have to. It's the most significant issue on an otherwise fine array of menus.

Searching for and downloading apps isn't a challenge, although finding one worth downloading outside of the usual suspects of iPlayer, Netflix and YouTube, is. The app store is packed with unfamiliar software.

Tweaking settings would be a pain if it weren't for the help text that explains what everything adjusts. The physical manual is next to useless and the one built into the TV is, you guessed it, slow.

The electronic programme guide (EPG) gives a decent amount of information on each show and remote shortcuts help you move more quickly through the week's listings.

The remote is probably the best aspect of using the TV. It's a comfortable size, but despite not being big, none of the buttons are crammed in carelessly. Distinct and clearly labelled, you'll be familiar with the layout in no time and the quick-access buttons that take you to Netflix, YouTube and others help you bypass those sluggish menus.

Is there anything else I should know?

You can control it with your voice, but with no microphone in the remote you'll need an Amazon Echo to make use of the feature.

There's a single-tuner PVR, so you can record one show at a time onto a USB hard drive, but you won't be able to watch a different channel while you do.

Should I buy it?

When the only thing a TV has going for it is its price then you know you're in trouble. The 7500 is entirely mundane.
cbrotherton30/06/2020 20:58

54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is …54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is going the other way. This mid-range set is easily in the bottom end of the 4K TVs we've tested this year.What is it?It's a 55-inch 4K TV from Hisense's mid-range 7500 series. It's not too basic, so still benefits from Dolby Vision HDR, which is designed to improve on the current HDR industry standard by adjusting contrast on a scene-by-scene basis. HDR10, which is also supported, can't do this, so Dolby Vision enabled content should have more balanced contrast.4K HDR content is more common than ever and worth seeking out to see your TV at its best. You still need to pay to watch the majority of it unfortunately, but the wide variety of content mean it's worth signing up for Netflix or Amazon Prime Video to see what all the fuss is about.SD and HD channels are still available for free through the satellite and Freeview tuners. You just need an aerial or satellite to watch.The three HDMI inputs and two USB ports at the rear are easy to reach. Any cables you've connected can be passed through the stand keeping them neat and partially out of sight.What's the picture quality like?The 7500 falls into many typical traps. Colours are unnatural and the yellowy tinge has actors looking like they need a trip to the doctor's before their next casting, while contrast is too bright. This is a less common issue, usually the contrast skews too dark, but the effect is the same: detail is lost.As we climbed up the resolutions only sharpness improved. The same issues affecting the SD picture are just as evident in 4K, and were worse in some cases. Transitioning between colours should be smooth, almost imperceptible, but they were jarringly bad in one of our test scenes.HDR does virtually nothing. Contrast is still too bright and detail gets lost in the gleam.We haven't found too many TVs that have struggled with off-putting digital artefacts, but the 7500 suffers. Halo-ing, where the area around an object appears distorted, and noise, which looks like static on flat areas of colour plague the picture at every resolution.What about the sound?There's more bass than we detected in the 65-inch 7500 and this helps the 55-incher to three stars for sound, but only just. It's still unbalanced favouring the top-end, but don't expect bright bursts of auditory excitement. The brilliance is weak.One of the HDMI inputs is HDMI ARC, so it's easy to attach a sound bar or surround-sound system. It doesn't have one of the newer HDMI eARC inputs. It works similarly to HDMI ARC but can transfer higher-quality audio. We'll probably only see this on the most high-end TVs for now and it's not something a TV must have to consider buying it.What's it like to use?Slow. Menus take too long to open and the TV doesn't react quickly enough to presses of the remote. It's something you'd likely get used to, but you shouldn't have to. It's the most significant issue on an otherwise fine array of menus.Searching for and downloading apps isn't a challenge, although finding one worth downloading outside of the usual suspects of iPlayer, Netflix and YouTube, is. The app store is packed with unfamiliar software.Tweaking settings would be a pain if it weren't for the help text that explains what everything adjusts. The physical manual is next to useless and the one built into the TV is, you guessed it, slow.The electronic programme guide (EPG) gives a decent amount of information on each show and remote shortcuts help you move more quickly through the week's listings.The remote is probably the best aspect of using the TV. It's a comfortable size, but despite not being big, none of the buttons are crammed in carelessly. Distinct and clearly labelled, you'll be familiar with the layout in no time and the quick-access buttons that take you to Netflix, YouTube and others help you bypass those sluggish menus.Is there anything else I should know?You can control it with your voice, but with no microphone in the remote you'll need an Amazon Echo to make use of the feature.There's a single-tuner PVR, so you can record one show at a time onto a USB hard drive, but you won't be able to watch a different channel while you do.Should I buy it?When the only thing a TV has going for it is its price then you know you're in trouble. The 7500 is entirely mundane.


I'd go along with all of that - bought the 50 inch 3 weeks ago from JL, fortunately the screen was scratched so I had the perfect reason to return it - just pay a bit more and get something decent
nazlfc30/06/2020 20:19

Shaw this in Costco Chadderton last week for £312 for those who are …Shaw this in Costco Chadderton last week for £312 for those who are members and nearby. Comes with the usual 5 year Costco warranty too.


How does the Costco warranty work been told it's a straight 5 years warranty and also to get the 5 years you need to take out a renewal subscription card membership card for five years ?
cbrotherton30/06/2020 20:58

54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is …54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is going the other way. This mid-range set is easily in the bottom end of the 4K TVs we've tested this year.What is it?It's a 55-inch 4K TV from Hisense's mid-range 7500 series. It's not too basic, so still benefits from Dolby Vision HDR, which is designed to improve on the current HDR industry standard by adjusting contrast on a scene-by-scene basis. HDR10, which is also supported, can't do this, so Dolby Vision enabled content should have more balanced contrast.4K HDR content is more common than ever and worth seeking out to see your TV at its best. You still need to pay to watch the majority of it unfortunately, but the wide variety of content mean it's worth signing up for Netflix or Amazon Prime Video to see what all the fuss is about.SD and HD channels are still available for free through the satellite and Freeview tuners. You just need an aerial or satellite to watch.The three HDMI inputs and two USB ports at the rear are easy to reach. Any cables you've connected can be passed through the stand keeping them neat and partially out of sight.What's the picture quality like?The 7500 falls into many typical traps. Colours are unnatural and the yellowy tinge has actors looking like they need a trip to the doctor's before their next casting, while contrast is too bright. This is a less common issue, usually the contrast skews too dark, but the effect is the same: detail is lost.As we climbed up the resolutions only sharpness improved. The same issues affecting the SD picture are just as evident in 4K, and were worse in some cases. Transitioning between colours should be smooth, almost imperceptible, but they were jarringly bad in one of our test scenes.HDR does virtually nothing. Contrast is still too bright and detail gets lost in the gleam.We haven't found too many TVs that have struggled with off-putting digital artefacts, but the 7500 suffers. Halo-ing, where the area around an object appears distorted, and noise, which looks like static on flat areas of colour plague the picture at every resolution.What about the sound?There's more bass than we detected in the 65-inch 7500 and this helps the 55-incher to three stars for sound, but only just. It's still unbalanced favouring the top-end, but don't expect bright bursts of auditory excitement. The brilliance is weak.One of the HDMI inputs is HDMI ARC, so it's easy to attach a sound bar or surround-sound system. It doesn't have one of the newer HDMI eARC inputs. It works similarly to HDMI ARC but can transfer higher-quality audio. We'll probably only see this on the most high-end TVs for now and it's not something a TV must have to consider buying it.What's it like to use?Slow. Menus take too long to open and the TV doesn't react quickly enough to presses of the remote. It's something you'd likely get used to, but you shouldn't have to. It's the most significant issue on an otherwise fine array of menus.Searching for and downloading apps isn't a challenge, although finding one worth downloading outside of the usual suspects of iPlayer, Netflix and YouTube, is. The app store is packed with unfamiliar software.Tweaking settings would be a pain if it weren't for the help text that explains what everything adjusts. The physical manual is next to useless and the one built into the TV is, you guessed it, slow.The electronic programme guide (EPG) gives a decent amount of information on each show and remote shortcuts help you move more quickly through the week's listings.The remote is probably the best aspect of using the TV. It's a comfortable size, but despite not being big, none of the buttons are crammed in carelessly. Distinct and clearly labelled, you'll be familiar with the layout in no time and the quick-access buttons that take you to Netflix, YouTube and others help you bypass those sluggish menus.Is there anything else I should know?You can control it with your voice, but with no microphone in the remote you'll need an Amazon Echo to make use of the feature.There's a single-tuner PVR, so you can record one show at a time onto a USB hard drive, but you won't be able to watch a different channel while you do.Should I buy it?When the only thing a TV has going for it is its price then you know you're in trouble. The 7500 is entirely mundane.


thanks for sharing !
cbrotherton30/06/2020 20:58

54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is …54% review on Which.co.ukREVIEWED AUG 2019OverviewIf anything, Hisense is going the other way. This mid-range set is easily in the bottom end of the 4K TVs we've tested this year.What is it?It's a 55-inch 4K TV from Hisense's mid-range 7500 series. It's not too basic, so still benefits from Dolby Vision HDR, which is designed to improve on the current HDR industry standard by adjusting contrast on a scene-by-scene basis. HDR10, which is also supported, can't do this, so Dolby Vision enabled content should have more balanced contrast.4K HDR content is more common than ever and worth seeking out to see your TV at its best. You still need to pay to watch the majority of it unfortunately, but the wide variety of content mean it's worth signing up for Netflix or Amazon Prime Video to see what all the fuss is about.SD and HD channels are still available for free through the satellite and Freeview tuners. You just need an aerial or satellite to watch.The three HDMI inputs and two USB ports at the rear are easy to reach. Any cables you've connected can be passed through the stand keeping them neat and partially out of sight.What's the picture quality like?The 7500 falls into many typical traps. Colours are unnatural and the yellowy tinge has actors looking like they need a trip to the doctor's before their next casting, while contrast is too bright. This is a less common issue, usually the contrast skews too dark, but the effect is the same: detail is lost.As we climbed up the resolutions only sharpness improved. The same issues affecting the SD picture are just as evident in 4K, and were worse in some cases. Transitioning between colours should be smooth, almost imperceptible, but they were jarringly bad in one of our test scenes.HDR does virtually nothing. Contrast is still too bright and detail gets lost in the gleam.We haven't found too many TVs that have struggled with off-putting digital artefacts, but the 7500 suffers. Halo-ing, where the area around an object appears distorted, and noise, which looks like static on flat areas of colour plague the picture at every resolution.What about the sound?There's more bass than we detected in the 65-inch 7500 and this helps the 55-incher to three stars for sound, but only just. It's still unbalanced favouring the top-end, but don't expect bright bursts of auditory excitement. The brilliance is weak.One of the HDMI inputs is HDMI ARC, so it's easy to attach a sound bar or surround-sound system. It doesn't have one of the newer HDMI eARC inputs. It works similarly to HDMI ARC but can transfer higher-quality audio. We'll probably only see this on the most high-end TVs for now and it's not something a TV must have to consider buying it.What's it like to use?Slow. Menus take too long to open and the TV doesn't react quickly enough to presses of the remote. It's something you'd likely get used to, but you shouldn't have to. It's the most significant issue on an otherwise fine array of menus.Searching for and downloading apps isn't a challenge, although finding one worth downloading outside of the usual suspects of iPlayer, Netflix and YouTube, is. The app store is packed with unfamiliar software.Tweaking settings would be a pain if it weren't for the help text that explains what everything adjusts. The physical manual is next to useless and the one built into the TV is, you guessed it, slow.The electronic programme guide (EPG) gives a decent amount of information on each show and remote shortcuts help you move more quickly through the week's listings.The remote is probably the best aspect of using the TV. It's a comfortable size, but despite not being big, none of the buttons are crammed in carelessly. Distinct and clearly labelled, you'll be familiar with the layout in no time and the quick-access buttons that take you to Netflix, YouTube and others help you bypass those sluggish menus.Is there anything else I should know?You can control it with your voice, but with no microphone in the remote you'll need an Amazon Echo to make use of the feature.There's a single-tuner PVR, so you can record one show at a time onto a USB hard drive, but you won't be able to watch a different channel while you do.Should I buy it?When the only thing a TV has going for it is its price then you know you're in trouble. The 7500 is entirely mundane.


Bizarre review. Do they not know how to calibrate a screen which would fix the majority of their described issues?!

I have the 50 inch version of this tv,fully calibrated for SDR and HDR. Fantastic tv for the price,PS4 pro looks and plays great on it too. Loads of built in apps - I use Netflix,amazon prime and YouTube regularly.

Of course a £1000+ tv will do it all better,but for a little over £300 this is a lot of bang for your buck. Recommended.
techadvisor.co.uk/review/tv/hisense-b7500-3700189/

This review is more in line with my experience with the tv. 4.5/5

Hisense has done it again by offering a remarkably good Ultra HD TV with HDR at an affordable price. If you don’t have the money for a flagship model, rival or not, the B7500 is easily one of the best mid-range TVs you can buy.
Edited by: "DeanoNI" 30th Jun
Does this have the Disney app?
DeanoNI30/06/2020 22:16

Bizarre review. Do they not know how to calibrate a screen which would fix …Bizarre review. Do they not know how to calibrate a screen which would fix the majority of their described issues?!I have the 50 inch version of this tv,fully calibrated for SDR and HDR. Fantastic tv for the price,PS4 pro looks and plays great on it too. Loads of built in apps - I use Netflix,amazon prime and YouTube regularly. Of course a £1000+ tv will do it all better,but for a little over £300 this is a lot of bang for your buck. Recommended.


Agree. Which reviews for TV's all seem to use the basic picture presets and not actually bother with any tinkering (a must on any TV these days). You could argue that the reviews more accurately reflect real world usage, the average TV buying public probably won't bother with detailed settings.
DeanoNI30/06/2020 22:16

Bizarre review. Do they not know how to calibrate a screen which would fix …Bizarre review. Do they not know how to calibrate a screen which would fix the majority of their described issues?!I have the 50 inch version of this tv,fully calibrated for SDR and HDR. Fantastic tv for the price,PS4 pro looks and plays great on it too. Loads of built in apps - I use Netflix,amazon prime and YouTube regularly. Of course a £1000+ tv will do it all better,but for a little over £300 this is a lot of bang for your buck. Recommended.


Yeah well look at the source, Which? don't have a clue about TVs, they just turn it on and guess. Even worse than What Hifi and their meaningless use of buzz words. Stick to AVForums, HDTV Test or RTings if you actually want some sense.
Dave_Lamb30/06/2020 23:27

Yeah well look at the source, Which? don't have a clue about TVs, they …Yeah well look at the source, Which? don't have a clue about TVs, they just turn it on and guess. Even worse than What Hifi and their meaningless use of buzz words. Stick to AVForums, HDTV Test or RTings if you actually want some sense.


It’s when they said “contrast is too bright” I had to laugh! You could say that about any tv if you have the contrast set up wrong! It’s like they don’t know there are options to adjust brightness,contrast,colour temp etc.
1 left back down to £329
This or the PHILIPS Ambilight 55PUS8204 for extra ~£150
Can you get the Apple TV app on this ?
DeanoNI30/06/2020 23:51

It’s when they said “contrast is too bright” I had to laugh! You could say …It’s when they said “contrast is too bright” I had to laugh! You could say that about any tv if you have the contrast set up wrong! It’s like they don’t know there are options to adjust brightness,contrast,colour temp etc.


Yeah crazy.... Clueless.... I do believe out of the box performance should be measured but basic settings like contrast, brightness, colour temp and sharpness, can always be set without the need to for specialist equipment. The poor info they supply only hurts customers making the wrong decisions.
Edited by: "Dave_Lamb" 1st Jul
Dave_Lamb01/07/2020 12:46

Yeah crazy.... Clueless.... I do believe out of the box performance should …Yeah crazy.... Clueless.... I do believe out of the box performance should be measured but basic settings like contrast, brightness, colour temp and sharpness, can always be set without the need to for specialist equipment. The poor info they supply only hurts customers making the wrong decisions.


Would anyone have a resource to help set all the settings please?
329 again @reindeer333
OOS but AO price matched for me yesterday. Coming on Thursday
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