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Home alone (1990) BLU-RAY £4.99 at play/fox direct
Home alone (1990) BLU-RAY £4.99 at play/fox direct

Home alone (1990) BLU-RAY £4.99 at play/fox direct

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Marv: He's only a kid Harry. We can take him.

1990 Press Featurette (3:43).
The Making Of Home Alone (19:22).
Mac Cam: Behind The Scenes With Macaulay Culkin (4:47).
Burglar-Proof Your Home: The Stunts Of Home Alone (7:01).
Home Alone Around The World (3:50).
Where's Buzz Now? (3:01).
Angels With Filthy Souls (2:04).
Blooper Reel (2:02).
Deleted Scenes / Alternate Takes

Accidentally left behind when his family rushes off on a Christmas vacation, eight-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) embarks on a hilarious, madcap mission to defend the family home when two bumbling burglars (Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern) try to break in - and find themselves tangled in Kevin's bewildering battery of booby traps!

11 Comments

No more waiting for the Christmas

you're what the french call les incompetents

Another great find, a real classic!

Blu ray? Was this even filmed in HD? Great movie! Second one is just as good. The new ones are so cheesy compared to the originals

Banned

Are you kidding me? Who would watch movie 2nd time? Ok..after 5 years can do, when forget half of it. But who would watch 20th time?
Would you buy a movie if you saw it 20 times?!
You guys really really, no REALLY suk.

AStonedRaichu

Blu ray? Was this even filmed in HD? Great movie! Second one is just … Blu ray? Was this even filmed in HD? Great movie! Second one is just as good. The new ones are so cheesy compared to the originals




This was filmed using film (Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman EXR 500T 5296)), which has a higher 'resolution' than blu ray, higher than 4K even depending on which source you rely on for information. For a better explanation read the following >

kenrockwell.com/tec…htm

en.wikipedia.org/wik…ion

"Kodak states that 35mm film has the equivalent of 6K resolution according to a Senior Vice President of IMAX"

support.red.com/ent…lm-

"It is generally agreed that the scannable resolution of film lies somewhere just over 3K"

Whichever way you splice it, it means that film comfortably works with the Blu Ray format.

My favourite film is 2001 Space Odyssey which was shot in 65mm negative format >

"ARRI estimates the equivalent pixel size to match the resolution of a 65mm camera (with modern optics and film) at 8746 x 3855 pixels.

The aperture size of 65mm is 52.5 x 23 mm which is double the width of Super 35, hence the DoF is shallow, even at medium stops.

All this being said, 65mm film acquisition (at least 5-perf) is all but dead (IMAX is 15 perf, and it's a niche market). So the best way to get large format quality is with a very high end digital cinema camera.

If the Epic enlarges the captured area to 24 mm wide or bigger, the DoF will be slightly less than RED One. With the full S35mm aperture, shooting at f2 will give the same DoF as 65mm at f4.

I think it's possible that with full S35 size capture, very high resolution fast lenses (like the Zeiss Master Primes) and the RED Epic, you should be able to get a 4K image that when properly projected will closely approximate the quality of a 70mm 4th generation contact-printed release print from a 65mm original."

That film is from 1968 way before HD formats.

One day I hope to see that film mastered on 4K or better, it looks pretty awesome on Blu Ray.




Edited by: "fishmaster" 14th Jul 2014

fishmaster

This was filmed using film (Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman EXR 500T … This was filmed using film (Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman EXR 500T 5296)), which has a higher 'resolution' than blu ray, higher than 4K even depending on which source you rely on for information. For a better explanation read the following >http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/film-resolution.htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_resolution"Kodak states that 35mm film has the equivalent of 6K resolution according to a Senior Vice President of IMAX"https://support.red.com/entries/22820071-How-does-4K-compare-to-35mm-film-"It is generally agreed that the scannable resolution of film lies somewhere just over 3K"Whichever way you splice it, it means that film comfortably works with the Blu Ray format.My favourite film is 2001 Space Odyssey which was shot in 65mm negative format >"ARRI estimates the equivalent pixel size to match the resolution of a 65mm camera (with modern optics and film) at 8746 x 3855 pixels.The aperture size of 65mm is 52.5 x 23 mm which is double the width of Super 35, hence the DoF is shallow, even at medium stops.All this being said, 65mm film acquisition (at least 5-perf) is all but dead (IMAX is 15 perf, and it's a niche market). So the best way to get large format quality is with a very high end digital cinema camera.If the Epic enlarges the captured area to 24 mm wide or bigger, the DoF will be slightly less than RED One. With the full S35mm aperture, shooting at f2 will give the same DoF as 65mm at f4.I think it's possible that with full S35 size capture, very high resolution fast lenses (like the Zeiss Master Primes) and the RED Epic, you should be able to get a 4K image that when properly projected will closely approximate the quality of a 70mm 4th generation contact-printed release print from a 65mm original."That film is from 1968 way before HD formats. One day I hope to see that film mastered on 4K or better, it looks pretty awesome on Blu Ray.



Thanks for that, just wonder why some older films (talking 80's classics for me like Lampoons, Planes T & A and this) always seem a bit grainy. I've always put it down to crap older tech, but clearly not?!?!?

Banned

Great deal , heat added

frakison

Thanks for that, just wonder why some older films (talking 80's classics … Thanks for that, just wonder why some older films (talking 80's classics for me like Lampoons, Planes T & A and this) always seem a bit grainy. I've always put it down to crap older tech, but clearly not?!?!?



It depends on the master used, and yes the cameras, you can usually find out which equipment was used by typing the film name in to Google along with key words such as negative format.

This is available on Sky On Demand if you have access.
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