Home Bargains - Unibond Sanitary Silicone White Sealant 300 ml tube
279°Expired

Home Bargains - Unibond Sanitary Silicone White Sealant 300 ml tube

18
Found 27th Jan 2013
Unibond white silicone sealant 300ml tube. Waterproof, mould resistant, permanently flexible for interior and exterior use. Excellent adhesion to most materials including many plastics, vitreous enamel, glass, metal,glazed ceramic and porcelain tiles. It is designed to seal around baths, sinks and other sanitary fixtures.
I've seen these on sale in Wickes for £6 or £7 and are currently on sale at screwfix for £4.99
screwfix.com/p/u…352
I know you can get cheap tubes of sealant from pound shops etc. but this is a good quality product and you can definitely tell the difference. More importantly, a bargain price.

18 Comments

Original Poster

elisadia

cheaper … cheaper herehttp://www.toolstation.com/shop/Adhesives+Sealants/Sanitary+Sealants/Contractors+Sanitary+Silicone+300ml+White/d180/sd3202/p50747



Different manufacturer and there is a postage charge for orders below £10 from this company - perhaps you can let me how much this is.

elisadia

cheaper … cheaper herehttp://www.toolstation.com/shop/Adhesives+Sealants/Sanitary+Sealants/Contractors+Sanitary+Silicone+300ml+White/d180/sd3202/p50747



Exactly what i bought yesterday............

Good stuff.

69philip0

Different manufacturer and there is a postage charge for orders below £10 … Different manufacturer and there is a postage charge for orders below £10 from this company - perhaps you can let me how much this is.

u can collect for free and the manufacture is at least good as Unibond

Original Poster

elisadia

u can collect for free and the manufacture is at least good as Unibond



Ok thanks

Original Poster

69philip0

Ok thanks

The nearest toolstation shop to me according to the branch locator on their website is 20.3 miles away from me (a round trip of 40.6 miles). The nearest Home Bargains is less than one mile from my home. Personally I'll be sticking to Home Bargains but your suggestion may be useful to some people.

is it as good as 'forever white'?

I bought this for a friend who texted me instructions to pick up "a sanitary product" for her when I was in Home Bargains.

I've never heard language like it before. And I used to work on the docks.

Good price for Unibond so gets some heat. However......

After years of using various sealants with mixed success I'm now using Dow Corning 785. Goes on reasonably easily (though may take some getting used to after cheap and runny consumer stuff!) and, most importantly, it really seems to last. It's about 2x the price of this Unibond, but given it'll last a LOT longer, it'll probably repay you in time/effort several times over.

Note that the top quality Unibond "Anti-Mould" sealant is also very good, but more expensive again. I don't actually know how good this lower grade Unibond one is? (They do tend to vary, depends on whether they are acetyl based (which both Unibonds are) and in the quality of the fungicide).

Dow is available from Screwfix (tho may be cheaper elsewhere) - screwfix.com/p/d…308

FWIW Screwfix do a fantastic chemical sealant remover that is really helpful for getting the old sealant off. Just cut and scrape as much old stuff off as possible and then paint this stuff onto the thin films that remain. After a few mins you can scrape the last of the old stuff off and wash down ready for new sealant. It's a bit more expensive than it used to be but still cheap for the results it gets - screwfix.com/p/n…987
Edited by: "qyestionmark" 28th Jan 2013

Off to HB ~ thanks!

qyestionmark

Good price for Unibond so gets some heat. However......After years of … Good price for Unibond so gets some heat. However......After years of using various sealants with mixed success I'm now using Dow Corning 785. Goes on reasonably easily (though may take some getting used to after cheap and runny consumer stuff!) and, most importantly, it really seems to last. It's about 2x the price of this Unibond, but given it'll last a LOT longer, it'll probably repay you in time/effort several times over. Note that the top quality Unibond "Anti-Mould" sealant is also very good, but more expensive again. I don't actually know how good this lower grade Unibond one is? (They do tend to vary, depends on whether they are acetyl based (which both Unibonds are) and in the quality of the fungicide).Dow is available from Screwfix (tho may be cheaper elsewhere) - http://www.screwfix.com/p/dow-corning-785-white/58308#FWIW Screwfix do a fantastic chemical sealant remover that is really helpful for getting the old sealant off. Just cut and scrape as much old stuff off as possible and then paint this stuff onto the thin films that remain. After a few mins you can scrape the last of the old stuff off and wash down ready for new sealant. It's a bit more expensive than it used to be but still cheap for the results it gets - http://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-sealant-remover-100ml/88987#



Cheers for the tip about the Dow Corning stuff. When I fitted my shower cubicle about 5 years ago I'm pretty sure I used decent anti-fungal stuff but there are patches of black mould on it now and it seems to have grown within the sealant (well it doesn't wipe off). So I think I'll give the Dow Corning a go, I'll need a pot of that sealant remover as well I think...

timefortea

Cheers for the tip about the Dow Corning stuff. When I fitted my shower … Cheers for the tip about the Dow Corning stuff. When I fitted my shower cubicle about 5 years ago I'm pretty sure I used decent anti-fungal stuff but there are patches of black mould on it now and it seems to have grown within the sealant (well it doesn't wipe off). So I think I'll give the Dow Corning a go, I'll need a pot of that sealant remover as well I think...



I think a big influence on how long the sealant lasts is just how clean and dry everything is when you apply the sealant. A thorough clean up is essential, especially of the old sealant which may have long been overtaken with microbes. The last big (DIY) job I did I bought a Fugi to shape the sealant and in my search for this I came across some specialist cleaning wipes. These both degreased the surfaces and killed all the microbes/spores before applying the new sealant. Again they add a few pounds to the job but will probably make the end result more durable. (A bag of 20-ish wipes was a few pounds from a plumbing supplies specialist, but I barely used half of them for two bathrooms). When I read reviews for sealants that say the sealant only lasted a few weeks or months I assume that the clean-up must have been shocking (and that the general hygeine in these locations must be horrendous!)

One final thing to consider is the shape you put on the bead. In the UK we assume that it's always wet finger shape(!) However in the US the norm is more usually for triangular. It looks a bit odd to us, and it needs a tool to shape it (like a Fugi), but it seems to make a more durable joint. You end up with less thin sealant skirts at the edge of the seal which is typically a great place for the fungus attack to start.

Good luck!

I will look into the Fugi tools thanks. Do you lay the sealant between two strips of masking tape? I usually put a strip parallel to each side of the edge needing sealed, a few mm out from it. Then once I have the sealant smoothed off I pull the tape off, which leaves a little edge about 1mm high on either side. Wondering if that is the best way to do it, it certainly avoids any thin films at the edge.

You can get so many types of silicon sealant these days is much of it just marketing? I've never seen on a tube just why any partic silicone sealant is pitched to a certain usage? (apart from aquarium silicone).

Good stuff, been in H @ M for a few months and been using in the kitchen.

timefortea

I will look into the Fugi tools thanks. Do you lay the sealant between … I will look into the Fugi tools thanks. Do you lay the sealant between two strips of masking tape? I usually put a strip parallel to each side of the edge needing sealed, a few mm out from it. Then once I have the sealant smoothed off I pull the tape off, which leaves a little edge about 1mm high on either side. Wondering if that is the best way to do it, it certainly avoids any thin films at the edge.



Sometimes I do. It certainly gives the cleanest looking results, and as you say reduces the thin skirts. If you use a shaping tool then there's actually no need though (but it takes practice!) If I'm doing a lot of shower or bath stuff I probably wouldn't but if I were doing a sink or something more at eye level then yes.

FWIW there's a good vid on youtube for the Fugi. I'm not sure that they actually work quite as well as the vids suggest - partly because of the skill required but also because the sealants they're using don't seem as thick as the high quality ones?
youtube.com/wat…MJc

@Meathotukdeals - most of the sealants are different, though I'll wager there are many which are simple repackaging jobs too!

One of the fundamental differences between them all is the main chemical composition - i.e. whether or not they are Acetyl based. A good sealant will have a strong smell of vinegar (i.e. acetic acid)! If there's no vinegar smell then chances are that you are already wasting your money! Another big difference is the type of anti-fungal used. A good anti-mould sealant is actually pretty toxic to most living things (hence the fish tank distinction)! This is not stuff you should be licking your fingers to get that wet finger finish!!

There is a LOT of engineering that goes into sealants. Just take a quick look at the following data sheet and you'll get a feel for what you are paying for.
sealantsandtoolsdirect.co.uk/pub…pdf


Anyway I'm turning into Mr Sealant Bore! Unibond make some great sealants and if you have to buy a cheap one then this deal is probably better than most. But if you have mould problems you may be better off paying more for the top level stuff.

Good luck all!
Edited by: "qyestionmark" 29th Jan 2013

qyestionmark

Sometimes I do. It certainly gives the cleanest looking results, and as … Sometimes I do. It certainly gives the cleanest looking results, and as you say reduces the thin skirts. If you use a shaping tool then there's actually no need though (but it takes practice!) If I'm doing a lot of shower or bath stuff I probably wouldn't but if I were doing a sink or something more at eye level then yes.FWIW there's a good vid on youtube for the Fugi. I'm not sure that they actually work quite as well as the vids suggest - partly because of the skill required but also because the sealants they're using don't seem as thick as the high quality ones?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-p0Yl-IyMJc@Meathotukdeals - most of the sealants are different, though I'll wager there are many which are simple repackaging jobs too!One of the fundamental differences between them all is the main chemical composition - i.e. whether or not they are Acetyl based. A good sealant will have a strong smell of vinegar (i.e. acetic acid)! If there's no vinegar smell then chances are that you are already wasting your money! Another big difference is the type of anti-fungal used. A good anti-mould sealant is actually pretty toxic to most living things (hence the fish tank distinction)! This is not stuff you should be licking your fingers to get that wet finger finish!!There is a LOT of engineering that goes into sealants. Just take a quick look at the following data sheet and you'll get a feel for what you are paying for.http://www.sealantsandtoolsdirect.co.uk/pub/pdfs/DC_785_Technical_Datasheet.pdfAnyway I'm turning into Mr Sealant Bore! Unibond make some great sealants and if you have to buy a cheap one then this deal is probably better than most. But if you have mould problems you may be better off paying more for the top level stuff.Good luck all!



Thanks for all the info!

qyestionmark

Sometimes I do. It certainly gives the cleanest looking results, and as … Sometimes I do. It certainly gives the cleanest looking results, and as you say reduces the thin skirts. If you use a shaping tool then there's actually no need though (but it takes practice!) If I'm doing a lot of shower or bath stuff I probably wouldn't but if I were doing a sink or something more at eye level then yes.FWIW there's a good vid on youtube for the Fugi. I'm not sure that they actually work quite as well as the vids suggest - partly because of the skill required but also because the sealants they're using don't seem as thick as the high quality ones?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-p0Yl-IyMJc@Meathotukdeals - most of the sealants are different, though I'll wager there are many which are simple repackaging jobs too!One of the fundamental differences between them all is the main chemical composition - i.e. whether or not they are Acetyl based. A good sealant will have a strong smell of vinegar (i.e. acetic acid)! If there's no vinegar smell then chances are that you are already wasting your money! Another big difference is the type of anti-fungal used. A good anti-mould sealant is actually pretty toxic to most living things (hence the fish tank distinction)! This is not stuff you should be licking your fingers to get that wet finger finish!!There is a LOT of engineering that goes into sealants. Just take a quick look at the following data sheet and you'll get a feel for what you are paying for.http://www.sealantsandtoolsdirect.co.uk/pub/pdfs/DC_785_Technical_Datasheet.pdfAnyway I'm turning into Mr Sealant Bore! Unibond make some great sealants and if you have to buy a cheap one then this deal is probably better than most. But if you have mould problems you may be better off paying more for the top level stuff.Good luck all!



LOL I often prefer the 'old stinky stuff' such as oil base paints and varnishes, good old creosote, good old pesticides, I even have some photo coatings in pressurised propellant that just blow your brains out in a small unventialted room. I know all the 'good old' things are now banned due to various toxicities...but for the job they were hard to beat.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text