Hopper Electric Bike - Tesco - £340 @ Tesco Direct
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Hopper Electric Bike - Tesco - £340 @ Tesco Direct

46
Found 9th Feb 2014
With £40 off for a spend of £200 or more (until 23 February), you can buy this electric bike for £340 (plus get a bit more off if you go through Quidco). Only £3 delivery or free if you choose to pick up from store. Not the best electric bike on the market but for this price (and with generally positive reviews if you look on the internet) it has to be worth a look

46 Comments

Love my elec bike!

These are just for total lazy sods!!!

Broonie_11

These are just for total lazy sods!!!


Not at all, I used to cycle around 175 miles per week combining work & mtb trail rding at weekends, would like to cycle to work further afield as an older person now with knee & spinal injuries, & not arrive at work knackered or have to use a car (or spend out on one) so the ability to do a bit of a work out & build myself back up to a decent fitness level is appealing, for those days the pain is high resort to this & go gently with a combo of battery & pedal power, other days mtb all the way.
whats wrong with that? ..& a question do you drive to work / drive in general, put in perspective you could be deemed a lazy sod for driving places.

I know older folk for whom a pedelec has been handy to get out, exercise gently & improve overall fitness that otherwise would be neglected after surgery.

short burst of intense activity, recovery time assisted, more short bursts of hard pedalling, as long as you don't use the battery all the time you are exercising, ...that must be good.

I could do with one for the school run lol

What's the range on one charge?

I see 15 miles

I bought one for the missus recently. We live in a hilly area and as a not very confident cyclist, the chances of her being able to get out and about on her old bike were unlikely. She really loves her hopper though as she no longer wobbles up hills, and actually sets the pace which I have to try and keep up with. I admit to being a little envious - especially when lugging back heavy shopping.

I recommend going for one of the slightly dearer ones though. The one in the deal above has a 5ah battery rather than 8.5ah in this one:

http://www.tesco.com/direct/hopper-shopper-electric-bike-blue/761-4756.prd?pageLevel=&skuId=761-4756

I think the extended mileage, 6 gears, surprisingly good rear suspension, front and rear lights and 3 levels of pedal assist is worth the extra 40 quid.

They are pretty good bikes for the money. Well made and some good attention to detail. Only the Chinglish manual lets it down a little.




Edited by: "greencat" 9th Feb 2014

Original Poster

I agree greencat - the one you suggested was the one I went for. Worth the extra £40, but I picked the cheaper one as the "deal" as I thought it might be more attractive to some. I should be picking it up from my local Tesco tomorrow - my only "worry" is whether or not it will do the business in terms of some of the hills we have around here!

Original Poster

meistic

I see 15 miles



Yes, 15 miles for this one but, as greencat has pointed out, the better deal might in fact be the one for £420 (still only £380 with the £40 off). That one has a range of 25 miles and the specs are generally probably worth the extra £40

Broonie_11

These are just for total lazy sods!!!


Don't feel left out, the new range will have one for morons too.

greencat

I bought one for the missus recently. We live in a hilly area and as a … I bought one for the missus recently. We live in a hilly area and as a not very confident cyclist, the chances of her being able to get out and about on her old bike were unlikely. She really loves her hopper though as she no longer wobbles up hills, and actually sets the pace which I have to try and keep up with. I admit to being a little envious - especially when lugging back heavy shopping. I recommend going for one of the slightly dearer ones though. The one in the deal above has a 5ah battery rather than 8.5ah in this one:http://www.tesco.com/direct/hopper-shopper-electric-bike-blue/761-4756.prd?pageLevel=&skuId=761-4756I think the extended mileage, 6 gears, surprisingly good rear suspension, front and rear lights and 3 levels of pedal assist is worth the extra 40 quid. They are pretty good bikes for the money. Well made and some good attention to detail. Only the Chinglish manual lets it down a little.



Also alloy frame rather than steel, it's folding, and has mudguards of sorts. Not sure how you'd lock the frame of that model securely though, but I guess at least you could fold it up and put a D lock through both wheels.

Edited by: "melted" 9th Feb 2014

Fine in theory - as always, though, the problem's finding a replacement battery (and other spares).

meistic

I see 15 miles



I have one of these and have done journeys of 15 miles. There is power left at the end.

Ooops- mine is the higher spec model with 6 gears and suspension- same name though, and I bought it at Tesco.

Incidentally, you have to pedal to make it go. At least, you have to move the pedals around- no need to put any effort in, but the motor stops if you stop pedalling.


Edited by: "LongPockets" 9th Feb 2014

wingreen

I agree greencat - the one you suggested was the one I went for. Worth … I agree greencat - the one you suggested was the one I went for. Worth the extra £40, but I picked the cheaper one as the "deal" as I thought it might be more attractive to some. I should be picking it up from my local Tesco tomorrow - my only "worry" is whether or not it will do the business in terms of some of the hills we have around here!



Mine gets up the one in seven hill that is the first part of every journey from my house, and all the other hills around here in the Cotswolds.

I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton folding bike for over 6 months because I don't have the strength anymore. Would this be suitable for someone like me with very little leg strength?

Broonie_11

These are just for total lazy sods!!!



Like everyone who drives a car/motorbike?

The main benefit I find is not being driven mad by frustration due to strong head winds. Eg, try cycling in our current lovely weather :D.

Original Poster

LittleRedRidingHood

I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton … I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton folding bike for over 6 months because I don't have the strength anymore. Would this be suitable for someone like me with very little leg strength?



I haven't taken delivery of this one yet but I used an electric bike while on holiday in the Pennines last year - brilliant. No effort required - just have to turn the pedals (without actually using any muscle power). I think an electric bike would be fine for you. If you're not sure, see if somewhere locally hires them out, so you can experience an electric bike first. I think you will be pleasantly surprised!
Edited by: "wingreen" 9th Feb 2014

I have this bike it is so heavy but it goes like a bomb.

wingreen

I haven't taken delivery of this one yet but I used an electric bike … I haven't taken delivery of this one yet but I used an electric bike while on holiday in the Pennines last year - brilliant. No effort required - just have to turn the pedals (without actually using any muscle power). I think an electric bike would be fine for you. If you're not sure, see if somewhere locally hires them out, so you can experience an electric bike first. I think you will be pleasantly surprised!



Thank you so much for your advice. I'm just worried about having to pedal. Silly question, does pedalling on a electric bike require as much effort as walking or would you say more or less? Thank you

Also would the blue one be suitable for a 5'2 female? And what's the difference between the blue one and the green one for £440?
Edited by: "LittleRedRidingHood" 9th Feb 2014

LittleRedRidingHood

I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton … I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton folding bike for over 6 months because I don't have the strength anymore. Would this be suitable for someone like me with very little leg strength?



I am not a doctor or anything, but it sounds like something like this would be great for you, takes little effort, and get you back into cycling again. Nice to hear that you have recovering from a not so nice situation...I think this would be a good thing to try. Spring is coming, would be very pleasant I reckon.

I too have a Brompton, which I love for short journeys in London, but it can be a bit if an effort to cycle. I have always fancied the idea of an electric bike, might look into this myself.
...


EDIT... have just read a review of the SE version, maybe it's a bit too heavy for easy transport, but for 25 miles use sounds alright, anyhow here's the review...

theguardian.com/tec…iew

Edited by: "DonkeyKonk" 9th Feb 2014

LittleRedRidingHood

I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton … I'm recovering from anorexia and I haven't been able to ride my brompton folding bike for over 6 months because I don't have the strength anymore. Would this be suitable for someone like me with very little leg strength?



It should be fine, LRRH. It requires really no effort at all providing you can turn the pedals. A fairly similar ride to the brompton too (nice low step over and quite upright ride). You can also increase the effort required as you get better too.

The only thing you might need help with is if you have to lift it. My missus cannot really lift hers e.g. onto a bus or train. Because of the battery, it's quite a bit heavier than a brompton. One thing you might consider (although it is rather more expensive) is the nano electric conversion kit for the brompton:

http://www.nanoelectricbikes.co.uk

They will even fit it for you. Good luck with your recovery.

Edited by: "greencat" 9th Feb 2014

LittleRedRidingHood

Thank you so much for your advice. I'm just worried about having to … Thank you so much for your advice. I'm just worried about having to pedal. Silly question, does pedalling on a electric bike require as much effort as walking or would you say more or less? Thank you :)Also would the blue one be suitable for a 5'2 female? And what's the difference between the blue one and the green one for £440?



My wife is 5 foot 2 and the blue one fits her just perfect. I don't think it would be suitable for anyone much smaller though as the saddle is just about as low as it'll go for her.

I think there's rather less effort than walking, especially up hills.
Edited by: "greencat" 9th Feb 2014

DonkeyKonk

I am not a doctor or anything, but it sounds like something like this … I am not a doctor or anything, but it sounds like something like this would be great for you, takes little effort, and get you back into cycling again. Nice to hear that you have recovering from a not so nice situation...I think this would be a good thing to try. Spring is coming, would be very pleasant I reckon.I too have a Brompton, which I love for short journeys in London, but it can be a bit if an effort to cycle. I have always fancied the idea of an electric bike, might look into this myself.



Thank you so much for your kind encouraging words And thank you for your advice. I think I should sleep on it and decide in the morning. I'm very tempted though...


greencat

I should be fine, LRRH. It requires really no effort at all providing you … I should be fine, LRRH. It requires really no effort at all providing you can turn the pedals. A fairly similar ride to the brompton too (nice low step over and quite upright ride). You can also increase the effort required as you get better too. The only thing you might need help with is if you have to lift it. My missus cannot really lift hers e.g. onto a bus or train. Because of the battery, it's quite a bit heavier than a brompton. One thing you might consider (although it is rather more expensive) is the nano electric conversion kit for the brompton:http://www.nanoelectricbikes.co.ukThey will even fit it for you. Good luck with your recovery.



Hey thank you so much. Especially for the link. It's definitely rather expensive and I can only wish it was within my budget. Hopefully one day I might consider it when I can justify the cost

"..I think I should sleep on it and decide in the morning. I'm very tempted though..."

Wise words for all Hotukdealers...

;D

Quick questions can you ride these if you have been banned from driving or not got a driving license and do you need road risks insurance?

DonkeyKonk

"..I think I should sleep on it and decide in the morning. I'm very … "..I think I should sleep on it and decide in the morning. I'm very tempted though..."Wise words for all Hotukdealers...;D



Yes I've become a lot wiser since my 2DS impulse buy X)

Ralph888

Quick questions can you ride these if you have been banned from driving … Quick questions can you ride these if you have been banned from driving or not got a driving license and do you need road risks insurance?


As there is no licence requirements for these, as for standard cycles, them it's not a problem. Again, there is also no legal requirement to have insurance.

Rickardo

As there is no licence requirements for these, as for standard cycles, … As there is no licence requirements for these, as for standard cycles, them it's not a problem. Again, there is also no legal requirement to have insurance.


Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed on one. I wonder if can get done for speeding, dangerous driving or drunk driving on one??

Ralph888

Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed … Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed on one. I wonder if can get done for speeding, dangerous driving or drunk driving on one??



I believe the electric motor is supposed to not provide any assistance if you exceed 15mph, and you'd probably struggle to go much faster pedalling with the low gearing and small wheels.

I seem to recall reading that speed limits don't technically apply to normal pedal cycles due to the law referring to motorised vehicles or some such thing, you can get stopped and done at any speed though for pedalling profusely. If you are stopped for being drunk on a bicycle or pedalling profusely it won't have any effect on a driving licence


Edited by: "melted" 9th Feb 2014

Ralph888

Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed … Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed on one. I wonder if can get done for speeding, dangerous driving or drunk driving on one??



Yes (S30 of the Road Traffic Act 1988) applies:
"A person who, when riding a cycle on a road or other public place, is unfit to ride through drink or drugs (that is to say, is under the influence of drink or a drug to such an extent as to be incapable of having proper control of the cycle) is guilty of an offence."

Electric bikes aren't playground toys. If someone uses them on public roads and hits a vehicle coming towards them, add that 15mph onto the combined impact force and factor in how much brain they'll be picking up with a spoon.

Ralph888

Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed … Thanks, I had heard already that no one under the age of 14 was allowed on one. I wonder if can get done for speeding, dangerous driving or drunk driving on one??



It's exactly the same as a pedal cycle. Legally no different. As long as it is pedal assist (not throttle), 15mph max (but 10% margin, so some do 16.5-17), and max 250w motor, then it is a bicycle in the eyes of the law. Any of those critiera are broken/exceeded, then it's an L1e light moped, requiring insurance, registering, tax, helmet, licence plate, etc.

melted

I believe the electric motor is supposed to not provide any assistance if … I believe the electric motor is supposed to not provide any assistance if you exceed 15mph, and you'd probably struggle to go much faster peddling with the low gearing and small wheels.I seem to recall reading that speed limits don't technically apply to normal pedal cycles due to the law referring to motorised vehicles or some such thing, you can get stopped and done at any speed though for peddling profusely. If you are stopped for being drunk on a bicycle or peddling profusely it won't have any effect on a driving licence



Not so. See this BBC report
Courts have the power to disqualify you from driving a car (and send you to prison for 2 years) if you’re convicted of causing bodily harm by wanton or furious cycling or racing, or by wilful misconduct or wilful neglect on a bicycle.
(OAPA s. 35; RTOA Sch 2, pt. 2; Taylor v Goodwin (1878-79) LR 4 QBD 228)

You can only be convicted of this offence if you injure someone while you’re cycling in a way which is wanton or furious or shows wilful misconduct or neglect. There’s no definition of what counts as wanton or furious or wilful – it all basically depends on how a jury would judge your cycling.

Since 2008 there have been two reported prosecutions of cyclists for this offence, both involving cyclists who rode onto the pavement at speed and knocked over a pedestrian, who later died. Both were jailed, and one was disqualified from driving. (R v Lambert [2008] EWCA Crim 2019; R v Hall [2009] EWCA Crim 2236)

melted

[quote=greencat] I bought one for the missus recently. We live in a hilly … [quote=greencat] I bought one for the missus recently. We live in a hilly area and as a not very confident cyclist, the chances of her being able to get out and about on her old bike were unlikely. She really loves her hopper though as she no longer wobbles up hills, and actually sets the pace which I have to try and keep up with. I admit to being a little envious - especially when lugging back heavy shopping. I recommend going for one of the slightly dearer ones though. The one in the deal above has a 5ah battery rather than 8.5ah in this one:http://www.tesco.com/direct/hopper-shopper-electric-bike-blue/761-4756.prd?pageLevel=&skuId=761-4756I think the extended mileage, 6 gears, surprisingly good rear suspension, front and rear lights and 3 levels of pedal assist is worth the extra 40 quid. They are pretty good bikes for the money. Well made and some good attention to detail. Only the Chinglish manual lets it down a little.


Any idea if this is any better? bikes-electric.co.uk/cla…ic/ It uses a 12Ah instead of an 8.5 and has room to put a kit bag etc on the back. It's £70 more but if paying out this kind of money you want to get it right. What I like about the Tesco one though is the 3 levels of assistance and the LED display. As I have spinal damage, this could be the beastie to get me back on a bike again.
TIA

Original Poster

JJG

Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ … Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ It uses a 12Ah instead of an 8.5 and has room to put a kit bag etc on the back. It's £70 more but if paying out this kind of money you want to get it right. What I like about the Tesco one though is the 3 levels of assistance and the LED display. As I have spinal damage, this could be the beastie to get me back on a bike again.TIA



I'm no expert but it looks a little outdated (electric bikes are improving all the time), plus very heavy at 40Kg. There are quite a few websites that give advice on electric bikes (but note that most are focused on the expensive options - £1000 and over). This website is quite good (and has some user comments on the Hopper range from users): pedelecs.co.uk/

I am using Tesco Hopper Urban SE ( the one which is 500£ on Tesco) for about 3 months. In windy, hill after hill conditions with almost persistent assistance I managed to squeeze out on average 6 miles, last longer with no wind and no high hills on the way. I am still using regular bike to get to the gym as I would not leave Hopper for few hours unattended, to compare the same road with Hopper it's a pleasure to ride. I would not call myself lazy, just too many hills on the way, but even with Hooper you have to use your legs power quite a lot if you don't have all day to get from a to b. It's not carry-with-foldable as it's too heavy. In general would recommend.

JJG

Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ … Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ It uses a 12Ah instead of an 8.5 and has room to put a kit bag etc on the back. It's £70 more but if paying out this kind of money you want to get it right. What I like about the Tesco one though is the 3 levels of assistance and the LED display. As I have spinal damage, this could be the beastie to get me back on a bike again.TIA



It's not just about the Ah. The 40kg v 25kg will count against it in terms of distance traveled. Extra mass, either on the bike or person riding it, will reduce travelling time. You can fit a rear rack on the Hopper but it requires some ingenuity. Check out:

pedelecs.co.uk for threads describing how in their discussion forum.

Ideally, you want to try any bike before buying it though - especially if you have back problems. You may even need help getting it out of the box given the heft. I felt the Tesco hopper was worth trying as you can return it within 28 days if it turns out to be unsuitable (and I certainly would have done if the missus had taken against it).

The Hopper is very much the bottom of the market electric bike wise. It's a damn good bike for the price, but it's not as good as the £1000+ bikes out there. And bear in mind, you can pay more for entry level conversion kits than for this bike. Batteries can run to a couple of hundred quid alone.

On any electric bike the ranges are advisory - if you're much heavier than average, always riding into head winds and up hills on maximum assist - then don't be surprised if you don't get anything like the full 25 miles out it. My missus is much lighter than average, happy to put some effort in on the flat (downhill she's happy to coast because she's frightened of going too fast) and easily gets 25+miles out of it.

JJG

Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ … Any idea if this is any better? http://www.bikes-electric.co.uk/classic/ It uses a 12Ah instead of an 8.5 and has room to put a kit bag etc on the back. It's £70 more but if paying out this kind of money you want to get it right. What I like about the Tesco one though is the 3 levels of assistance and the LED display. As I have spinal damage, this could be the beastie to get me back on a bike again.TIA



I think havimg litihum batteries would be far preferable to sealed lead acid. If you discharge even deep discharge lead acid by more than 80% it will seriously reduce the life expectancy, so you'd need a higher capacity SLA to make up for that plus the extra weight of the lead battery + heavier bike.

I think you migjt also have to replace SLA batteries far sooner than lithium.
Edited by: "melted" 10th Feb 2014

I am 64kg , and no way even on flat it will make 25 miles if used as intended.

Newbold

Fine in theory - as always, though, the problem's finding a replacement … Fine in theory - as always, though, the problem's finding a replacement battery (and other spares).



Not at all, simply have a chat with the lovely folk @Navitron renewables forum battery bikes, messing around with batteries & make your own lithium batt packs cheaply are there to be seen, or to simply direct you to a site to buy a hunk o rechargeable batts cheaply, ..good folk!

should be noted that tesco site info is left wanting! ..supplier is avocetsports.co.uk/ who are Manchester area based & have been selling this type of bike for a number of years, they carry plenty of spares, in fact having just spoken to them i'm very impressed as they spec the bikes themselves & get the bikes made in china, this means a better element of quality control & UK spares supply for years of use, battery is Lithium based though chemical composition could not be ascertained, the speed controller (handlebar mounted) for "typically required" spare stock, should you drop your bike, so no long waits to keep you on the road.
the claim is that 95% of queries can be dealt with on the phone, ...bodes well, the firm has numerous bike brands within it's hands & therefore should not be simply thought of as a bike re-seller, looks like they are there for the long haul.
replacement batteries are always expensive so don't leave it alone, as they can be put to other uses.

I'd go for one if I had the cash right now.

melted

I think havimg litihum batteries would be far preferable to sealed lead … I think havimg litihum batteries would be far preferable to sealed lead acid. If you discharge even deep discharge lead acid by more than 80% it will seriously reduce the life expectancy, so you'd need a higher capacity SLA to make up for that plus the extra weight of the lead battery + heavier bike.I think you migjt also have to replace SLA batteries far sooner than lithium.


Horses for courses!
Lithium batteries only last about 3 years - whether you use them or not, They also have a limited number
of charge/use cycles (around 500 full cycles/1000 half cycles).
How long they last also depends on the quality of the electronics that monitor how they're used.

Lead gel batteries are a LOT heavier but IF you avoid deep discharge they can last much longer than lithium.
They're also a lot cheaper.
Lead gel self-discharge so make sure you top up the battery every month even if you don't use it.
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